Before You Read a Banned Book: A myTake on Censorship in Literature.

Before You Read a Banned Book: A myTake on Censorship in Literature.

(Sorry, for the Picture of me. I struggle still to get quality photos.)

Introduction:

Good Evening Gaggers, for my next myTake, I'd like to discuss National Banned Book Week. A week in September, where Americans of all ages read and advocate for literature that have been declared to be too offensive for viewers. Now, as someone who owns and has read "banned" and "challanged" books, I've had fantastic experiences reading them, as much as I've had horrid. When it comes to reading "offensive" material in the name of free speech, I shall make it known that one must be cautious about how much a Reader can stomach, the importance of understanding the purpose of why the sensitive material was written in that context, and knowing the reason as to why you have chosen to place these stories inside your very being. This way, I can hope to spare you of the dreaded, "Reader's Remorse". If you are interested in reading a banned book, my advice to you should be taken into account:

Rule # 1: Always, Always, Do Your Research on the Authors Life.

Nine times out of ten, the author's life will determine the stories he/she will tell. For example, Ernest Hemingway was a great American writer-and currently a "banned" writer, because of his life growing-up in the thick of WWI and The Roaring 1920's. A realm of Sex, Drugs, Secularisim, and Violence. He was the type of writer whom would become cheerful one day and somber the next. He was also an Anti-Theist. He would also live life up to a certain point, where one can feel cheap thrills, until the thrill was fleeting-then he chose to live no more and killed himself at 65 years of age. Because of studying his biography, I have no interest of reading his works for pleasure. C.S Lewis, on the other hand, was a former Atheist and Christian philospher of the Modern 20th century. He was a stodgey, old professer during the WWII and Post WWII eras of London, England. During that time, he was the writer who wrote the timeless, Chronices of Narnia series for his niece who was curious about knowing Jesus and Chrstianity. Today, it still captivates young audiences. I myself, have read the entire series, and if you would pardon my comment, I think it 's much better than reading Harry Potter. *gasp*. I just love the Christian allegory about sin and redemption.

Rule # 2: Read the Summaries and Reviews of the Material via Sparknotes.

Robert Cormeir was my worst case of Reader's Remorse. When I was reading The Chocolate War, I had an idea in mind that it would be a bleak novel. Yet, I was not aware of the novel being very bleak and extremely gruesome. I read a summary from Wikipideia that failed to give important details about the story. Sadly, when I was fourteen, I remember puking and wailing in my bathroom after reading of the unfortunate tragety of Jerry Renualt-and how he failed to defeat the evil Archie Costello and his petty gain of cowardly Vigils. Besides that, I detested the violent detail about Danny having a rape fantasy towards a young lady eating in the diner. To make matters worse, every novel I read from him had a dismal and pointless ending, to the point where I feel the need to break my silence and lament. Okay, here it goes:I HATE READING HIS DUMB MATERIAL! His books did nothing but highlight all the pains and sorrows, I ever felt as an older child to the point where I started to self-harm. *breathes* Alright, I think I can continue.

Rule # 3: Know Your Limits and Boundries.

I'm a generally sensitive and comical. I love humor, postive thoughts and anything that can help me overcome and continue living life. Copious amounts of dark material tends to drain and depress me. If you are someone like me-try your best to stick to comedic writings like Mark Twain or Harper Lee. Your psyche will thank you. If not, then read to your heart's content. Also, if you feel uncomfortable about reading books with incest or homosexuality, then see above.

Rule # 4: Have Fun and Be Safe.

I hoped you enjoyed reading my article.


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What Guys Said 8

  • Hemingway's Old Man and the Sea was a great read, why limit yourself because of an authors life? Many banned books were for political reasons not content.

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  • I personally enjoyed the chronicles of narnia, though I am agnostic. I felt he encompassed all that was right with christianity and ignored all the things wrong with it. It was a good read. Never read the other authors, I was more of a fan of fiction rather then realistic fiction. To be honest I never understood the banning of any book. Nothing should be censored, it should be available to students to read if they feel they should.

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  • 1. Ernest Hemingway is a way better author than C. S. Lewis could ever be.
    2. A lot of people would find his life a positive and want to read more because of his hard, scientific and rebellious lifestyle.
    3. Hemingway had a physical disorder which caused his bad temper and lead to his suicide.

    Sorry to rant at you, but I felt I had to defend a great author in history.

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    • I still think that he's a shmuck. C. S Lewis had more insight than Hemingway on life and living.

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    • Wow the myTake owner seems to have lost her dignity with the rant. I guess she's butt-hurt over the realization that her beliefs are fraudulent.
      @myTakeOwner you started off being hypocritical by saying Hemmingway was an ass for being atheist and then mocking the opinion owner for not liking C. S. Lewis for being Xtian.

    • @jillianvirtualbot Agreed she sounds like someone who uses false logic and resorts to using emotions.

      Science and evolution basically prove things in the bible are BS like the 6 thousand year old earth. I could go on and on but i won't guessing she is a crazy religious person.

  • It appears you and I agree on practically nothing. Your content aside, the subsection titles are fair suggestions. Fairwell

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  • I like Rule #1 and #4. I don't care what other people think so I don't like Rule #2 but to be fair it could be a timesaver. I tend to push limits and boundaries, so I don't like #3, the idea I can't be safe with certain information just seems apalling. I actually did pass out a few times though from some stuff, lol. Unrepeatable here, ofc.

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  • wow, great post. it's sad that in a country that touts it's freedoms that books get banned. censorship is thoroughly unamerican, yet it's sadly persisted for centuries.

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  • Are you saying the US of A have censorship in literature?

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  • Wow! I loved reading this! Yes, there are some stupid endings to stories and some are just pointless. I know exactly what you mean. Thanks for sharing.

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What Girls Said 3

  • I love the Narnia series and many of his other books. I think it's silly not to read Hemingway because you don't like his lifestyle... to an extent. There are lots of amazing books on the banned book list like To Kill a mockingbird.

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  • Sounds like you're a slave to trends and fashionable books. To criticize the great minds of Hemmingway (who's books are taught in schools worldwide) is kind of like an art student criticizing Vincent Van Gogh.

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    • Yeah i was thinking the same thing its like she simply doesn't care about people with great minds, instead like you said she's into fashion the least important thing on this planet.

  • I 've read Ernest Hemingway. Some of his books are interesting while others plain boring. One author I regret reading a book of his, is William S. Burroughs. I quote from wikipedia 'Much of Burroughs's work is semi-autobiographical, primarily drawn from his experiences as a heroin addict, as he lived throughout Mexico City, London, Paris, Berlin, the South American Amazon and Tangier in Morocco. Burroughs accidentally killed his second wife, Joan Vollmer, in 1951 in Mexico City, and was consequently convicted of manslaughter.'. In 'naked lunch', he's telling the truth about how horrible drugs are and what they do to you, talking from his own experiences, plus he'd foreseeing a bleak future, but it's so full of sickness of body and mind, I just can't stand it. I still own it but I 'll get rid of it soon.

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