The Joys and Wonders of Classical Music

Now I know most people on here probably are not fans of classical music or don't listen to it, as we have a lot of Rap, Hip Hop and Rock n Roll fans on here. So I wanted to pay homage to Classical Music the things it brings to the table. Like creativity, deeper thinking and a sort of deeper feeling or feeling emotion at a deeper level while listening to it. And how classical pieces tell a story.

So below I'm going to post some well known pieces and some very good pieces with various feels, stories, styles of classical music etc. I hope to give some people who have never heard much of it before a interesting look into classical music and perhaps draw some people into it. We'll have some dark pieces, some playful, upbeat pieces, some mysterious and some deep pieces, also if you listen very carefully I am sure you will recognize some of this music and how some of these pieces were the inspiration for some of the themes you've heard today, in video games and movies and how they were influenced by them.


Rachmaninov: The Isle of the Dead, Symphonic poem Op. 29 - Andrew Davis


Gustav Holst- The Planets


George Gershwin - "An American in Paris"

Zdeněk Fibich - At Twilight


Giovanni Sgambati - Symphony No. 1


Enjoy and if you have any pieces that you think should have been added or classical pieces that you, yourself just simply enjoy feel free to post them in the comments.


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What Girls Said 1

  • First thing I really got hooked on was piano solos. There was this guy in my high school who played the piano, and was super eccentric, and insanely good. (He was actually on the faculty at the Universität Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria, a couple years back... so he's apparently even better than I knew. lol)

    He played with this INCREDIBLE passion.
    It was unbelievable, and inspiring. Kind of thing that brought tears and a smile to my face at the same time.

    Two of his performance pieces, at the time, were Chopin's Ballade no. 3 (op. 47), and Chopin's Scherzo no. 2 (op. 31).
    These are all over youtube. If you can find recordings by Emanuel Ax or Evgeny Kissin, those are particularly good.
    The "op." numbers are sequential numbers ("op" stands for "opus", Latin for "work"). Just no. 1 through no. whatever, because lots of works by the same composer have the same title. (e. g., the same guy might have 5 or 10 different pieces called "Waltz in C Minor".)
    The interplay between fast-and-furious and flighty-dreamland in those two is pretty amazing, if they are played well.

    --

    Here's Valentina Lisitsa playing Liszt's "La Campanella":
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MD6xMyuZls0

    This one's as enjoyable for the visuals as for the music itself. I like the complete lack of tension in her arms/wrists, etc. Jealous, I am.

    I also like the spaz faces she makes from 3:15 to 3:25 or so.

    --

    Symphonies:
    You gotta start here with the big ones. Beethoven's 5th symphony, then the 9th, then maybe the 7th.

    I remember doing the imaginary-conductor-in-the-dark thing, as a little girl, with Beethoven's 5th when I first heard it. Especially the transition between the 3rd and 4th movements.

    I think you'll also like these:

    Die schone Melusine / Fair Melusine overture (Mendelssohn)
    two recordings -- no need for the video here, just the audio:

    (a bit faster, more passionate, but mb a bit sloppier in the fast parts)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSUztzMHtYI

    (a little slower, but more articulated)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Dv80u1_z3s

    Tchaikovsky -- Romeo and Juliet overture: (slow build-up to about 4:30, that's where it gets good)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2jKeYuPvjM

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