Do your eyes change color when you die?

I'm just curious. Do they change color when we die?


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Most Helpful Girl

What Girls Said 10

  • The eyes get "duller" - like, there is literally no life in them at all. I believe that there are nutrients in the body that help to maintain pigment, and obviously when you are dead, nutrients are no longer supplied to cells in the body. Also, the cornea that covers the iris and the pupil absorbs the fluids inside the eyeball so it becomes cloudy, giving the impression that the eyes have changed color.

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  • I would assume that the gene for eye pigment would cease to be produced, probably resulting in no eye color.

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  • are you trying to find out if you'll look good for the necrophiliacs?

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  • I looked at a cadaver or two, the professor didn't say anything about his/her (I went twice, two different bodies) eyes changing color. He just lifted the eyelid and talked about the eye and its color. To me, it looked the same as if someone were alive.

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  • My grandma told me when her mother died in front of her Its literally like there was a light In her eyes and it turned off !

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  • They tend to become a pale color over the iris and pupil though the actual color varies.

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  • does it matter? I don't really think a body's pigment changes when they die...but once the body swells to a certain point, the tiny blood vessels may break and color the entire eye,

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  • Well after someone dies I thought they took the eyes out

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  • i think they turn pale and eventually all colors fade

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  • yeah I think somebody told me that the eye color stays the same but it turns pale and not shining ...but I don't know to what extent this is true !

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What Guys Said 6

  • It's kinda like that question "If a tree falls in the forest and there's nobody there, does it really make a noise?" Who cares?

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  • nope they turn to jelly!

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  • I don`t know such, but I know that the splendour is off.

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  • I don't know. I haven't died yet.

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  • To date, there have been no published scientific research studies on this phenomena.

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    • Wrong. (check below you)

    • I was quoting that paper. Here's a link. You can find the sentences I wrote, if you look.

      link

      The paper itself is inconclusive on the subject. It says "If iris color consistently changes postmortem in humans, then this taphonomic artifact must be incorporated into victim identification protocol,"

      Note Bene the use of the word "if".

  • Yes, to some extent. If you like details hit your local library and read up on postmortem iris color change. I know there has been some research on the topic.

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    • The anon guy above telling the truth?

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    • The in situ blue eye, at room temperature, turned brown/black within 72 h. If iris color consistently changes postmortem in humans, then this taphonomic artifact must be incorporated into victim identification protocol, including disaster victim identification software, and autopsy reports to prevent inaccurate victim identification and inappropriate exclusion from the identification process

    • ^That is the context of the quote... The publication was dealing with pigs, and if the trend carries true in humans, then it should be incorporated into forensic science techniques. Being that scientists don't kill off humans to study them dead, it's hard to make that jump... They see these trends in the pig model. I would assume the findings of this research has caused them to ask more serious questions, which may lead to observation of human eyes which have been donated to science.

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