A red tie, any ideas?

I'm going to buy a nice red tie, do you have any ideas of what color shirt, belt and pants to wear with it? Also, what is your favorite color on a tie is?


Most Helpful Guy

  • You're just going to be wearing shirt/tie/pants, no jacket?

    I probably wouldn't go red tie in that situation. Its a very 'strong' color, it works better in a more formal look. It looks decent with a charcoal or navy suit, or I suppose black, though black suits are really less useful, and look either clubby or _extremely_ formal.

    Some guys wear red ties over blue shirts, but to my eye, its not a great look. Red on white is fine, but very 'bold'.

    • No jacket, I wear ties to work and live in Florida, we don't usaully wear jackets down here. What do you think about a red tie and beige shirt or red tie with a grey shirt, what color pants would you wear?

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    • You suggested a red tie, white shirt, and light grey pants. What color shoes and belt would you wear with that?

    • The safe choice would be black. Tan might work, though would be better with a light beige or 'natural' colored pant. I live in a sad northern climate wear nobody wears bucks, but if you can get away with them, I would.

What Girls Said 3

  • I think a black shirt and pants would go best.

    • That's a great look but that's the typical look with that color tie. I was looking for something out of the ordinary.

    • Hmm. Definitely NOT green, or orange or yellow. Maybe try a dark grey, or blue or purple?

    • The dark grey sounds good, what do you think about a beige shirt with it?

  • Black shirt.<3, Black Pants<3

    • Well I wear ties for work, how do you feel about a red tie with a grey, white, or beige shirt?

    • sounds goood. Probably grey!

  • How about a Black shirt with small red pinstriping. You can find them at Express.


What Guys Said 1

  • Oh no, I strongly suggest you don't do that.

    Unless you plan to wear a hot pink shirt and Winsor yellow trousers to go with (I'm kidding), red is a very sharp color and needs to be toned down, which is mostly done with a jacket (full suit that is). But in this case assuming this isn't a Christmas related event nor is too formal, things are different

    They key tip for formal wear is, that every component should compliment one another.

    It doesn't have to match as such, but it should look cohesive. Just like how your shoes match you belt (this is not a rule, but it is traditionally done). Tie and socks also look good when matched.

    You can never go wrong with a crisp white dress shirt, black trousers (they may be slightly textured or/and have very subtle grid pattern or lines etc), a silk slim-tie and black shoes. Don't be reluctant to spend on quality if you have to, because these are the essential items of your wardrobe, and they are really worth the price.

    If you want to be a little adventurous, I suggest you experiment with the trousers, choose sapphire/royal blue. Try your best to keep the tie black, they look best best in that color. You can also use that same tie for the rest of your life and it would always look perfect, with every formal outfit.

    Keep the shirt in lighter colors since you are wearing a tie and not going with a suit. If not white, any pastel color would do, but prefer cream, beige and gray hues. Gray looks wonderful with a tie.

    If your event is casual-formal, then you can even play around with the trouser even more. even checked trousers like this


    would do. But this is usually a summers look so if you go with this, make sure the pattern is very very subtle.

    In belts, go for a very simple, decent one with no fancy buckles or stuff. You can do black or chocolate brown but try to stick two either of these two and keep it leather. Again, its suggested it matches your shoes.

    Lastly given that you do insist on the red tie, go with a brown belt (VERRY simple brass-bronze buckle), white dress shirt and black pants. And yes, silk shirts or silk trousers are a big NO NO NO. So are white leather shoes. Totally out of fashion and look tacky when experimented with.

    Don't be reluctant to spend a little more if you have to, it REALLY pays off. These things will come handy in the long run, and simpler, the better. Make sure you have a great not-too-loud fragrance, everything should be nicely ironed, try to drop cuff-lings unless others are doing it. Your hair should be freshly cut and washed up whenever you wear formal, you should be properly shaved.

    Sorry if this was too long, but I really spend my time on clothing questions, and especially the formal attire ones, because good taste in dressing (for me), sets apart the gentlemen from those who aren't. I am glad you took the concern of asking for suggestions. Good luck!

    • I agree with most of this, except the black pant love - in some circles, its considered to make you look like a waiter.

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    • My point was simply that daytime office wear and evening formal wear are not the same. The fact that black is appropriate for one does not make it 'perfectly appropriate' for the other. In traditional anglo-saxon dress, a black suit is not a conservative daytime look. Is that changing? Maybe. Was that true 150 years ago? No. Is that true in Germany, for example? I believe no. But if you're going to a formal business meeting in london, I wouldn't wear a black suit if you have options.

    • You have missed my point. When I mentioned the correlation between office and formal wear, I wasn't referring to the color palette or even fabric material for that matter, but the etiquettes of sporting it (like how the belt matches shoes). And that too of a 3 piece suit wear, not tuxedos or anglo saxons. While mentioning color, I was only pointing out how black and white is a very safe option in such formal wear, which suits almost all body types, complexions etc. Also, it's politically correct