Why is verbal bullying not as consistently punished as physical bullying / fighting in schools?

All of us in the USA, and probably the world, heard about the Columbine High School shooting many years ago (I believe that was in 1999).

Immediately afterward, awareness of bullying and its very detrimental psychological effects (imo, moreso than physical bullying) have been brought to light and USA schools cracked down on bullying in all forms immediately after this incident.


But nowadays, that "light" on bullying has faded, and bullying isn't handled by school authority figures (schoolyard proctors/security, teachers, principals) unless physicality (pushing, fist-fighting) is included.

The ironic thing...is verbal bullying is more psychological damaging to someone than physical bullying is.


Meanwhile, verbal bullying is swept under the rug by school authority figures...


...until it festers into physical bullying, or even worse, a psychologically damaged student bringing weapon(s) to school and seriously injuring/killing the students that psychologically tortured him/her for the 35hrs a week he/she is on school grounds.

Everyone has their breaking point in anything.


My question to all of you is: why do you think that verbal bullying is so commonly "brushed off" by administration?

Do you think that school administration should take on more responsibility to combat verbal bullying, or do you think that administration should "back off" and ignore verbal bullying?


Share your thoughts and experiences with bullying (either as the "bully" or the "bullied") while in public school.

Please be respectful of other people's views.

  • Vote A Schools should take on more responsibility to punish students for verbal bullying
  • Vote B No, administration should "stay out of the way" when it comes to bullying unless it's physical bullying

Most Helpful Girl

  • For nearly half a school year, my younger sister was verbally abused by a girl who accused her of stealing her boyfriend. The girl called my sister a slut, whore, etc. and basically spread the rumor that my little sister slept around and stole her boyfriend by throwing herself at him and having sex with him. None of which my sister did.

    My sister has been verbally bullied before. She's a 4'11" ginger covered in freckles in high school, who likes poetry and video games rather than shopping or sports and dresses a little on the "scene" side. She has a relatively rough time making friends as it is, and the girl did a lot of damage that year.

    It got to the point where my sister decided to just ignore the girl. This pissed the bully off, and she began threatened my little sister, telling her and her friends that she was going to beat her, hurt her, and even at one point, kill her. I convinced my sister to go to the principal about it (she only consented to go if I went with her), and once we explained the situation to the principal and SRO, I was absolutely appalled at the way they handled it.

    "Well, can't do anything about it unless you have proof" was what they said. We tried at least four different times to bring the attention to their eyes, and every time, we were turned away.

    A month later, the girl found my sister in the halls during class, pulled her to the ground by her hair, and started punching her in the back of the neck and head. My sister was shaken, but thankfully not too badly injured, even though the girl managed to bend her glasses out of place so they now sit unevenly on her face.

    My mother and I were quite livid.

    It usually does have to get to physical violence for the schools to step in and do something, and it's absolutely ridiculous. It took my sister being absolutely humiliated (the girl was screaming at her while she hit her, so tons of students got up to look out the doors and saw) in order for the girl to be removed from the school permanently.

    I think the reason why principals brush it off so often is because it's too much of a hassle, and the students being bullied are the shy, meek ones who don't have much of a voice. It needs to change. And soon.

    • I would seriously kick the ass of ANYONE who did that to my family or friends. If not give them a serious talking to meaning they will never try that crap again. I can be pretty intimidating.

    • I haven't seen the girl since, but you can bet I'll be scaring the piss out of her (I can't touch her; she's underage). Trust me, I can be scary as hell when it comes to my family, especially my little sister.