Everyday Technology That Exists Because of War

Everyday technology that exist due to war

I know that nobody likes going to war. It's bloody, causes conflict, love ones get hurt, people die, and the list just goes on and on. Though due to the wars countries get into they end up inventing things that have now become apart of everyday use for common citizens.

Sun lamp

During the winter of 1918 in Berlin during WW1. An estimate of half the children were suffering from rickets. This disease is caused by a deficiency of vitamin D and not enough calcium. A man named Kurt Huldschinsky started to experiment and remedy this problem. They soon started to noticed that his invention was working and the children were becoming better thanks to this new lamp he had created.

Tea bags

These were invented in 1908 during WW1. An American tea merchant started to send small bags to his customers. One point they ended up either on purpose or accidentally dropping the bags into water and well you can figure what happened after that. :D

Vegetarian sausages

I know this one is probably making you scratch your head on why they would make this due to war. During WW1 when the British blockade of Germany began, starvation set in badly in the city. The mayor of Cologne, Adenauer, got a great idea about ways to substitute available materials for scarce items, such as meat. After his long hard work he made the soy sausage that ended up a success.

Microwave Oven

This invention was invented during WW2 by an engineer named Percy Spencer, who was testing a high-powered radio set. He only discovered what he had made when a chocolate bar melted in his pocket while he was working.

Internet

The Advanced Research Projects Agency (now DARPA, the US military's R&D department) played the biggest part of coming up with the internet. Yeah a lot of people took part in it but ARPAnet stands out as the forerunner. ARPAnet expanded quickly to include research from institutions and universities. That lead them to be the testbed for a lot of the infrastructure underlying the internet, like the crucial TCP/IP protocols.

GPS

This one is all thanks to the military which was designed during the Cold war. It was to provide a navigation system for the Polaris submarine-launched intercontinental ballistic missile. The platform for GPS consisted of 24 satellites, this was to allow a receiver anywhere in the world to calculate its accuracy down to just a metre or two. They didn't always let civilians be able to use this system until after May 2nd, 2000. This allowed civilians to get accuracy down to centimetres rather than metres.

Canned Food

In 1809, Napoleon and his army went across Europe. He then reached a point where he needed a way to deliver enormous quantities of good-enough food to the front lines. The French government then held a contest to find anyone that could solve this problem. The cash prize for the winner ended up being 12,000 francs. The man who ended up winning the contest and solving the issue was Nicolas Appert. He designed a sealed glass jar that could be produced a large quantity in factories. Nicolas then used his prize money to build such a factory, sadly the British burned it down during their rampage through France in 1814.

Digital Photography

During the Cold war, one of the most popular inventions to come from this conflict is the Digital Photography. Due to the military having to drop rolls of film out of the sky from spy planes. That became tricky due to the high altitude of the drops and having them float down by a parachute. This invention was first employed in the NASA-Air Force KH-11 satellite in 1976. After that solved the problem the spy planes could then transmit the components back to earth by using encoded radio signals.

ANTIBIOTICS

In 1928 a Scottish scientist by the name, Alexander Fleming, was working on a anti-bacterial agent. To his misfortune it became unusable until WW2 thanks to the infectious diseases that plagued the wounded soldiers. Once the war ended this became a common part of Western medicine, now it's to the point that the overuse of these medicines have become a major health problem.

AMBULANCE SERVICES

The first time this became a thing was in the late 15th century, in the Spanish army. Though the concept of our modern ambulance wasn't until Napoleon’s army. This all became standard issue for Union troops during the Civil War, and in 1869, Edward Dalton, who was a former Army surgeon. Introduced to the Commercial Hospital of Cincinnati the first large-scale ambulance service. At the end of the following year the service had answered 1401 emergency calls.

TAMPONS AND PADS

Kimberly-Clark who ran a lumber company and papermill came across an interesting new application for wood pulp in 1914. She then mixed this material into a fluffy material, which ended up having the ability to absorb 5 times the amount of what cotton can do. She then started to sell her cellulocotton to the military, this providing the soldiers of WWI an efficiently new material for bandaging and sealing wounds. Once the war ended Kimberly Clark was stuck with factories making cellulocotton. Civilian doctors and surgeons weren't making any demands for her new product compared to the military. She ended up thinking most of her factories would end up closing which would have cost hundreds of jobs and millions of dollars. After Kimberly-Clark heard a rumor concerning Army nurses that had served or near the front lines of the war. How the nurses were embarrassed by the cloth flaps that they had to wash and then re-use them. So being on the front lines of battle to help wounded soldiers was a nightmare having to keep them clean. Thanks to this invention that nightmare was over.

Even though nobody likes war and what it brings, it's still good than we did for we wouldn't have any of these inventions if we didn't.


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What Guys Said 13

  • 3mo


    Practical use of X-rays was developed during WW1 : Marie Curie saw a need for field radiological centres near the front lines to assist battlefield surgeons. After a quick study of radiology, anatomy, and automotive mechanics she procured X-ray equipment, vehicles, auxiliary generators, and developed mobile radiography units, which came to be popularly known as petites Curies ("Little Curies"). She became the director of the Red Cross Radiology Service and set up France's first military radiology centre, operational by late 1914. Assisted at first by a military doctor and by her 17-year-old daughter Irène, Curie directed the installation of 20 mobile radiological vehicles and another 200 radiological units at field hospitals in the first year of the war.
    (I remember having read that she died from a cancer she got from handling radio active material)
    The radar

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  • 3mo

    So I should thank Germans for the Vegetarian sausages? Thank you WW1 :P

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  • 3mo

    That was a very good take!

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  • 3mo

    Pretty much any time a species has reached resistance they either overcome or fade out since not much support is given. Overall very tacticool photo

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  • 3mo

    Surprised duct tape didn't make the cut

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  • 3mo

    Fascinating myTake, 'StacheCat!
    Being from Wisconsin I know that Kimberly Clark actually wasn't female and was not a person. Kimberly, Clark and Co. was founded in 1872 by John A. Kimberly, Havilah Babcock, Charles B. Clark, and Franklyn C. Shattuck in Neenah, Wisconsin, with US$42,000 of capital.
    In WWI army nurses used the cellu-cotton surgical pads as sanitary napkins prompting the company to come out with Kotex pads after the war.

    The wartime homefront was resourceful, too. Nylon was used for stockings and tires when wartime supplies of silk and rubber dried up.

    Laundry bleach got its start in WWI used as "Dakin's solution" in battlefield hospitals in France where it proved to be a valuable antiseptic saving the lives and limbs of many WWI soldiers (compared to Civil War soldiers with similar wounds).

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  • 3mo

    i thought antibiotics were discovered on accident by a microbiologist who was on vacation and didn't clean his lab. when he came back he noticed mold grew on a plate and there was a buffer zone between the bacteria and the mold.

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    • 3mo

      That was penicillin which is antibiotic but I'm think this was other antibiotics.

  • 3mo

    Seriously!.. Babe!.. you are awesome..
    ( I know you are in a relationship!.. Hey sorry!.. couldn't control)

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  • 3mo

    And porn

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  • 3mo

    What about cds dvds etc? What material is the shiny side, tinfoil? Lol

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    • 3mo

      Ever notice how certain discs are thinner and lighter than other discs. Wii u games feel like they have a thick plastic coating. I guess to prevent scratching so easy

    • 3mo

      Neither the tin foil or CD were war inventions though.
      Not even the magnetic tape.

    • 3mo

      I know CD were first made with transparent foil, not tin or aluminum foils.

  • 3mo

    It is true that technology advances in war time as long as that nations' infrastructure remains intact. When that no longer is possible the nation stops progressing and if the damage is too bad that nation could crumble.

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  • 3mo

    That really stayed from what we see here on gag
    But I loved it
    Really interesting and we always need diversity on here

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  • 3mo

    Didn't know vegetarian sausages were a technology lol. I'm just taking the piss in all seriousness great take.

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What Girls Said 6

  • 3mo

    very interesting take

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  • 3mo

    Wow this is awesome.

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  • 3mo

    I have learned many facts from this myTake 😊 I kind of expected GPS to make into the list and it did.

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  • 3mo

    Yep.

    Also of note -- Almost every advance in visual displays (TV's, computer monitors, etc) in the last 25 years has been due to either (1) the military, or (2) porn.
    Because those are the only people who really care about SUPER high resolution displays and SUPER accurate color spectra, when you get down to it. (Gamers care about resolution, too, but the development of the gaming/graphics software itself lags way behind the relevant display technology.)

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    • 3mo

      Color science, which is necessary to use if you want to have accurate colors, is not a product of military needs.

    • Show All
    • 3mo

      Afraid not.

  • 3mo

    Cool!

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  • 3mo

    Really interesting thank you !

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