Why are people so afraid of racism?

I'm not talking about accepting racism. I mean that a lot of people are very prone to dismiss any talk of race. The funny thing is that at the same time they have no problem with racial data being collected by the government. So which is it?

Look at experiments like this, where a black hand got 20% less for baseball cards on ebay, compared to a white hand.
http://blogs.wsj.com/ideas-market/2011/10/28/using-ebay-to-study-racism/

This experiment suggests that white people subconsciously think of monkeys and apes when they see black people.
http://stuffwhitepeopledo.blogspot.com.au/2009/02/associate-black-people-with-monkeys-and.html

Is this stuff scary to talk about? Is it preferrable to run away from these subjects instead of discussing them intelligently?


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Most Helpful Guy

  • Any and all the true powers that be aren't interested in having an intellectual conversation about race. It's not scary to talk about. It's scary to realize and accept that what happened actually happened and it wasn't that long ago. It's easier to just walk away from the topic and focus on what you believe as an individual and focus on what makes you and your family comfortable and safe. It's always easier to look the other way instead of staring at and addressing the problem straight on. Talking about race and solving racial tension doesn't make anyone money in the short term therefore it's not an immediate concern. Some people would be held accountable for the actions of their ancestors if we were to try to mend racial tension in America as many groups of people continue to feel the effects of past actions. There is a lot of work to be done in race relations in this country but there is more money to make.

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What Girls Said 2

  • I think people are very prone to dismiss any talk of race because they prefer to sweep it under the rug. If talking of race issues, one must admit that such issues exist, and I think many want to believe that it is a thing of the past; that it is a non-issue. It is opening pandora's box, and unfortunately, people do not want to deal with all that would come out of the box

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    • There's some truth to that analogy, but I don't think being that scared of what's in the box is warranted, at all. It's more scary to ignore it and to allow it to languish.

    • I fully agree with you, but it feels like many people don't. Ignoring the box is more scary and one day, it'll explode in everyone's faces.. Yet I have very few friends I can discuss race and racism with, others shy away from the topic, and like to pretend it isn't an issue. Yet, like you pointed out, various evidence shows that it IS an issue

  • There are always going to be racism of varying degrees. They can keep thinking forever while the arabs, Indians and Chinese slowly finally engulf their country's land, franchises and culture... And they won't even notice this.

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What Guys Said 6

  • I think a lot people treat the word like something out of a horror movie - If you speak its name 3 times it will appear - The mere mention of the word racist has people running into the trenches and putting battle gear on

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  • Denial, denial, denial
    People so badly want to believe that racism is not a big issue usually because they don't face the systematic effects and are unaware or because they take the hard facts as an attack on them or their race and get defensive. You know how many times I've been called racist for simply stating that blacks get profiled more often than whites and receive sentences 4x as long as whites? <- That's systemic racism and pointing it out and calling it for what it is got me called a racist!!! Smdh

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  • This is a very insightful question. I find that many Afro-Americans are uncomfortable discussing race relations with people of Euro descent, as if the very act of bringing it up was a sign of racism or “white guilt.”

    I like discussing race relations in mixed company because I think it helps to get rid of the stigma. As for why people are uncomfortable, I can only say that there is a great deal of pain in our history.

    Slavery seems like a long time ago but it only SEEMS that way. Let me put this into perspective. Denzel Washington’s maternal grandparents were born into slavery. How would you feel if people in your family could recall a time when they were viewed as property?

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    • Even if slavery is seen as being distant, segregation in the country was still going on 100 years later. When it was finally challenged, one of the two political parties suffered a coup and engaged in a strategy of stoking racism to gain votes. They didn't even acknowledge of apologize for it until the 00s. And apparently they're sorry they did, because plenty of shills are trying to censor that history as we speak. The wikipedia article about it is constantly defaced with people trying to rewrite history https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_strategy

    • Fascinating article. You gave me a bit of an education. It is always disconcerting when politicians are willing to sell out the constitution for votes.

  • I don't care about racism but I use stereotypes from every races even myself to joke around with people If I can't tell my Hispanic friends to go eat beans I'm going to shove a taco up someone's butt because it's starting to tick me off people are becoming such sensitive "cats" *im saying cats because I don't want my comment to get deleted by a sensitive cat*

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  • People are afraid to talk about it because they are worried they themselves may be racist. Racism now has a lot to due with media portrayal of different races in popular culture.

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