Do English really get annoyed with the term 'soccer'?

Okay, so obviously for English people, football is literally soccer and American football is practically rugby. So I want to know if this annoys English people in general (for the record I'm English myself and curious). A main reason I'm asking this is I find it frustrating when talking to someone of another nationality and confusion arising when they confuse what we consider football with American football.

So, is this annoying?

  • Yes
    37% (7)41% (9)39% (16)Vote
  • No
    32% (6)32% (7)32% (13)Vote
  • Other
    31% (6)27% (6)29% (12)Vote
And you are? I'm a GirlI'm a Guy

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Most Helpful Guy

  • The whole thing is weird.

    In the beginning, there were two footballs...
    It started with Association Football and Rugby Football. The word Soccer comes from shortening Association... so it basically was soccer football and rugby football. American football, and Canadian football... and Australian football for that matter, all evolved out of rugby football. It seems like Britain decided it was too confusing to have two footballs, so rugby dropped the football term and soccer football no longer needed the identifier, so it dropped the association term, and you ended up with football and rugby.

    Ever notice how the balls in American, Canadian, and Australian football all look like modified rugby balls? Because that's where they came from. So while they all seemed to get the memo that two footballs was too confusing, they found that their version of modified rugby football was more popular than soccer football, so they swapped which parts got dropped. So they ended up with soccer and football.

    What annoys me is that people get annoyed that some call it one thing and some call it another, when both names for it are just as legit. I actually flip flop between calling it soccer and football, based on who I'm talking to. It's as if those people don't even understand the history or meaning of the words they are arguing about.

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What Guys Said 15

  • Interesting question, here in Brazil we say "Futebol", it's obviously a version in Portuguese for the word football, so we're with you English, it's football for us.

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  • YES OMG. STOP AT ONCE AMERICANS!
    IT'S FOOTBALL! YOU'RE THE ONLY COUNTRY WHO CALL IT SOCCER!
    STAHHHHHHHHP!

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  • I'm not English but Dutch. What English consider Football we consider Football. And I guess that is the same for every European. Having had a North American girlfriend it was a bit annoying to hear her and her family say "Soccer" and for them really confusing when i talked about Football.

    By the way to annoy them even more I would every now and then say "Our Football is the kind of Football you actually play with your feet"

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  • Not really, but what really irritates me is when Americans actively correct me when I say "football" instead of soccer.

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  • I've spoken with English folks before and never gotten confused or annoyed with it -shrugs- I guess not everyone knows when you or they are talking about their nationalities specific sport. I mean you miles well refer to it for what it is Football and Rugby and football which is soccer and soccer which is football lol.

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  • How can someone from England get annoyed by the word 'soccer' when the word came from England originally?

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  • British people hate Americans and anything they perceive as being American, ESPECIALLY any linguistic differences.

    With American Football, they say it shouldn't be called football because you carry and throw the ball, not kick it.

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  • A lot of Brits certainly gets blood boiling by the term soccer.. Which is ironic as that word came from Britain.. Ohh my dayzzz

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  • well globally it's known as football or in other languages futbol, fussball, calcio etc but they all mean the same thing

    some English people do get annoyed but what I know about these certain English people is that they hate and bitch about everything so whatever

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  • I can't have an opinion just because I'm not British? 😕

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  • yes. but then football is an umbrella term really. like rugby is really called rugby football (for both union and league..)

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  • It puts me in a pathological rage and I start hitting things.

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  • Call it what you like the game sucks. And yes British

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  • Well call it what you guys want it still sucks mayor donkeys...

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  • I am not English but i watch English football and i have noticed they get annoyed by that

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What Girls Said 8

  • I have a lot of English cousins and I just literally can't talk to them if God forbid I call "football," soccer. The heckling comes out, the jeers, the boos, the lectures. I don't live in England... here in the states we call it soccer. If I lived in England, sure go ahead, go to town on "proper" names of things, but there is just so much more to life than squabbling over useless points such as which word is better. Somehow I still manage to sleep at night...

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  • I'm English. I don't think it is annoying but I just don't understand how they can call the NFL football, when most of the time the ball is in the hands? Also it's not a ball, it's an egg. So it should be called HandEgg. Or Maybe Throw & Catch would be better suited. Or they can call it Timeout, as that seems to be what they spend most of the time doing.

    Soccer is called football because 90% of the game the ball is is being kicked with the foot. Foot to ball = Football. Makes sense. I guess Americans couldn't think of a name for their sport. So they stole ours.

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    • Americans didn't make up the name. The English did.

      The rules of association football were codified in England by the Football Association in 1863 and the name association football was coined to distinguish the game from the other forms of football played at the time, specifically rugby football. The term soccer originated in England, first appearing in the 1880s as an Oxford "-er" abbreviation of the word "association"

      American football is modified rugby football. England eventually dropped the 'soccer' from association football, and the 'football' from rugby football. The Americans simply did the reverse.

      Etymology aside, I do agree that Timeout may actually be the most fitting name if you want to consider what is happening on the field most of the time.

  • I'm English and yeah, that can be pretty annoying :)

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  • I'm irish😂 our football is GAA, our soccer is soccer, rugby is rugby and American football is American football

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  • No, I actually think it's really logical. We should find another name for American Football.

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  • I chose other, because It doesn't annoy me. It frustrates me when I talk to other people who call soccer football and they keep going on about it, like, "You don't even use your foot in football" "Americans aren't too smart" that's annoying to hear that cx but other than that.. I don't find it annoying... that's why when I speak about soccer with non-americans I say "our soccer, your football" so there is no confusion cx

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  • I've talked with English people before. And if they say football i just ask them and they don't seem that annoyed. And the conversation moves on from there. No big deal

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  • We call it soccer and the English people call it football.
    Well haha yes it does annoys me sometimes

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