Is jury duty really that bad?


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Most Helpful Girl

  • My law professor said that if ever we got the chance to sit on a jury we ought to. He said it'd be a good experience.

    It depends what you look for. You could get a boring case and be over and done with after a day. Or you could get an interesting case and be there for months.

    Whatever you choose to do, sit or not, you MUST respond when requested. You can be jailed for ignoring the summons. Go be in the pool and then get let go before being put on the actual jury.

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Most Helpful Guy

  • Not bad at all, I spent two weeks as the foreman on the jury for a trial involving two deaths charged as First degree murders. We were only sequestered for one night. Deliberations took a few hours over two days. Being a part of the process was fascinating. I enjoyed the interaction with other jury members. Most jurors had such a positive experience that we met for dinner a week after the trial was over. I run a tight and fun jury.

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    • Did they fry them?

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    • Cool

    • Thanks for the MHO.

What Girls Said 4

  • I enjoyed it when I did it! Sadly, my case was settled before it went to court (they took a plea deal), but I was so excited for it. It was even a murder case!

    Most other people there hated it. I guess because they have to take time off work to be there, and they only get compensated like $15 a day for it.

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  • I almost had to be a juror for a week on a trial. I was working over the summer and for one day I got a check for like 15 dollars when I could have made like 100 at work (not fulltime so I didn't get the pay). So if you have other priorities it sucks, but if you do nothing all day it's not really different.

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  • My mom found it boring.

    In the letter it said that if you don't go /respond, you could be charged as felony or something.

    So make sure you go.

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  • @cavmanier could help. He attends those when his picked.

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What Guys Said 11

  • Depends on lots of things. First of all, how the jury system works in your area. Do you come in once and either get selected or not, or do you have to come in several days? What kind of jury do you end up on? (regular, Grand Jury, Special Grand Jury) What is the crime? Etc.

    I was on one jury for a drunk driving charge. The cop gave a ticket at an accident scene to a witness for drunk driving, because he saw her walk unsteadily to her car. By the time it made it to court, the cop had retired and came in to testify, the prosecutor was not sure of what he was doing, and the defense was a public defender that did not familiarize himself with the case at all. When the defendant took the stand, she almost tipped the chair over sitting down. She explained that an industrial accident had crushed her hip years ago and made her unsteady when walking.

    Neither the prosecutor not the defense attorney had any idea about that before she took the stand. When we discussed it, we could not know if she was telling the truth or not, but the prosecutor had definitely not proven his case. We acquitted. Later I was leaving the courthouse for the parking lot, and saw her limping to her car. She had been telling the truth.

    I was on a Special Grand Jury investigating a ring providing non-residents driver license materials so they could pose as residents and obtain driver's licenses. Lots of defendants and many charges. Lots of witnesses that we interviewed. (Yes, because it was a Special Grand Jury the jurors could ask questions and call for other witnesses.

    I was almost called for one case that would have been a heart-breaker, but the jury was filled before I was called. A Hispanic man was accused of molesting his own daughter, and from what we heard leading up to the selections, he likely did it but his wife was standing by him due to fear of losing her kid's father and a Hispanic type thing that gave the male head of the house much more authority than we are used to seeing.

    So it can be fun, It can be heart-breaking. You will learn a lot if selected. I am old enough that I can just request to be excused, but I doubt I ever will. I will willingly do my "duty" and appear on juries when asked.

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  • I was actually considering doing a YouTube video about my jury duty experience. I got kicked out on day 1 of preliminaries, for making the defense look stupid by asking too many questions and having a bigger imagination. And understanding the cable TV lineup better than she or the judge did. She was convinced I would manipulate the jury somehow, by being "too smart," and that it wouldn't be true groupthink. It'd be basically me leading and making all the decisions.

    That totally wasn't my intent, but I came across as a wise guy. And when they reviewed the personal histories of jurors, I had the most unbelievable backstory. I almost felt like I was the one on trial, to be honest. Except, it was impossible for me to defend myself without everyone else in the selections process bursting out laughing. The place was turning into Comedy Central, and I knew I'd get sent home.

    When she asked that I be dismissed, I was breathing a sigh of relief. I was so nervous the whole time that I'd sneeze at an inappropriate time and be found in contempt of court. When I get that nervous, I sometimes get really goofy.

    Simply showing up was a hassle. I forgot I was wearing a watch, and the metal detector kept going off. I felt like Wolverine, in the most embarrassing possible way. Everyone was staring at me like I was Neo.

    Then they put me in this dark room with wooden walls to await further instruction, along with hundreds of other extremely-bored potential jurors, and left me there for 3 hours. It's that weird feeling you get as a little kid getting lost in a basement office with wooden walls, but with security everywhere as if it were a jail. The drinking fountains were nasty, and everyone clustered into little cliques and spoke in hushed tones waiting for their group number to be called. The cliques ignored each other. Like a high school where everyone's agoraphobic. Being a natural floater, I finally found someone who would talk to me... after 2 hours of silence. With not much to say.

    I mostly just doodled in my binder to pass the time. They at least let me keep the binder, though they confiscated most everything else. The first case was BUI. The dude looked totally guilty. Alcoholic flush face and worried expression. The second was an alleged shoplifter. Funny guy with a beard, looked like he wouldn't hurt a fly. I asked if he brought any merch into the store by accident, bought elsewhere. Easy mistake to make, and he'd be screwed.

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    • To clarify: the alleged shoplifter was at a hardware store. The judge didn't know about Investigation Discovery, and wanted to know what it was. The more I tried to explain what was on that channel, the more he kept interrupting and giving wrong guesses, the weirder the conversation got.

      The defense asked me if it were possible he misplaced his cart and it got mistaken for a returns cart. When I brought up the "bringing merch in" theory, she got embarrassed cause she didn't think of it.

      I was actually worried that day, since I'd never been to that part of that town, that I wouldn't be able to find the courtroom in time. That if I showed up ten minutes late for my appearance deadline, I'd go straight to jail. For getting lost in a strange town. Thankfully, Google Maps pulled through. Place was a maze though.

  • No it is not. I have done it. When I did jury duty they taught us exactly how it worked and let us know exactly what was expected of us before entering the court room.

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  • Depends on the jurors. My uncle was on a jury duty once and it was about a dude committing a crime. All the evidence in the world was there proving the guy guilty but one of the jurors couldn't come to a consensus because the accused was the same race as them and they didn't want to have them thrown in jail because of it. I don't quite remember how the issue was solved.

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  • It's crappy work for almost zero pay. You tell me?

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  • If you don't have much time to spend away from work and family, it would suck. Otherwise it might be a neat life experience.

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  • I wish I was born in Guatemala that way I wouldn't have to participate in it

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  • yes. becuause you most care about things that you don't care about.

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  • boring and a huge waste of time. but u know u ain't got shit else to do

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  • I was called and went to sit in the lobby for 6 hours but my name wasn't called for a trial and I was glad.

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  • It sucks for sure. I deregistered from voting to avoid it.

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    • It's not that bad. I survived. Yeah, I got kicked out on day 1, but I avoided the contempt charge that I was worried would be inevitable. I got nervous and talked too much.

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