How do you pronounce the simple past form of the verb "to beat"?

So my girlfriend and me were having an intense disagreement today. We mostly speak English together but none of us is an English native speaker. I've lived in the US for some time and she's spent some time in Canada however. Today I told her a story and when I was done, she said to me "babe, the past form of 'to beat' is also beat, pronounced the same way as the infinitive. You keep saying 'bet'". I tried to explain to her that in my opinion, both forms are possible. I personally say "beat" (past form) with the same sound like in the past form "read" or in the word "bet".
It's confusing to me because other times when I'm corrected I agree that I wasn't completely sure but this time I'm absolutely convinced I've heard my form both in movies and in real life uttered by native speakers. So what is it for you? Do you say beat (bi:t) or beat (bet)?

  • beat (bi:t) like in "beet"
    93% (28)87% (13)91% (41)Vote
  • beat (bet) as in "he rEAd a book yesterday"
    7% (2)13% (2)9% (4)Vote
And you are? I'm a GirlI'm a Guy

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Most Helpful Girl

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    • Well, this song actually doesn't really work for my question because there are only present simple instances of "to beat" used in here and no past simple. But I like the song anyway and considering all the other opinions given, I concede my mistake :-)

    • I mean, it answers it in the sense that I use them interchangeably. :p but thanks for MH

What Girls Said 10

  • beat (bi:t) like in "beet"

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  • I would say "beaten"? Or beeeeeet not bet wtf lol

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    • "beaten" is the past participle, not past simple.

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    • Well, it is a real word in the sense that it's being used. I've heard some southern folks say it. But I concede that the overwhelming majority seems to go with "beat" as in "beet".

    • I've never heard anyone say "They bet me" when they mean beat.
      Maybe you're confusing bet with beat,

  • Your girlfriend is right on this one.

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  • Like "I will beat this game", "I am beating this game", "I beat this game yesterday"?
    I say beat as in beet.

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  • That might be what they say in the south or something, but it's not proper grammar.

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    • Well, technically speaking, there is no standard English in North America, so southern dialects are as correct as northern ones. But I concede my mistake. I see the overwhelming majority says "beet" ;-)

  • Nope, definitely beat, pronounced "beet"'

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  • Your gir is right lol.

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  • It's pronounced like "beet"

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  • I beat [beet] you yesterday.
    I have beaten [beet-en] you already.

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  • Your accents are probably different BC they talk funny Canada anyway

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What Guys Said 3

  • I'm pretty sure this is A).

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  • The past tense is beaten. Beat is a synonym of beaten though but is used in a different part of speech

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    • No, "beaten" is the past participle. That's not the same thing as past simple. I was asking about the past simple form.

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    • This has nothing to do with splitting hairs, it's two completely different grammatical tenses! One is present simple, the other one is the participle of the present perfect. Present simple and present perfect are used for expressing different things. You're a Brit, man! Do you not know your own language?

    • Yes I do know my own language. I also know grammatically it's the stiffest language in the world. It gets boiled down in this country. No-one apart from foreigners bother about past participles, gerunds, adverbs present and past tenses, independent and submissive clauses possessives and active verbs and the whole circus of other labels and their parts in speech. Besides you either understand the grammar of your native tongue or you don't. Most of it's common sense and over complicated labels

  • Your girlfriend is right.

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