Have you ever seen a public transport vehicle which is a hybrid between Tramway and a Trolleybus?

I've heard of such vehicle, but never seen one myself.


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Most Helpful Girl

  • I've heard of them too, they are known as GLT (Guided Light Transport), or TVR (in French - Transport sur Voie Réservée).
    They are produced by Canadian transportation company "Bombardier".
    These vehicles can run on conventional road surfaces or a dedicated track (guideway).

    Here is the Bombardier GLT vehicle operating on a single rail track: ymtram.mashke.org/.../nancy21550.jpg

    But here, you can that the vehicle is able to drive on a road, without any guideway, just like a trolleybus: ymtram.mashke.org/.../nancy21600.jpg

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    • Last sentence *But here you can see that the vehicle* (sorry about the typo) and thank you for the MHO :)

Most Helpful Guy

  • Yes, I have, it's called Bombardier GLT (Guided Light Transit).
    As far as I know, these vehicles are currently used only in French city of Nancy.
    Basically, it's a dual-mode/road-rail vehicle, capable of moving both on rails and road, a pure combination of Tramway and Trolleybus.
    The vehicles are guided by a central guidance rail, they ride on rubber tyres, not on rails, however, the rail does not support the vehicle, and the actual wheels which are as independent as those of a regular Trolleybus.
    Unlike Trams, GLT vehicles have a steering wheel, they are capable of being steered and operating independently of the guidance rail, just like a standard Trolleybus. Anyway, steering wheel is not used when following a guidance rail (Tramway mode).
    Essentially, it's a composite of rubber-tyred Tramway, and rail-guided Trolleybus, as you can see in the video.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OmcTt6sGwYU

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What Girls Said 2

What Guys Said 7

  • I've heard of them (the examples posted above) and they seem to be an unnecessary middle ground between a bus and a streetcar, as they don't have any of the advantages of either. A bus is maneuverable in traffic, while a streetcar accelerates quickly and gives a quiet, smooth ride. This seems more like a way of cheaping out on building a proper streetcar or LRT, except it seems to need almost as much infrastructure to operate, but is too large to be easily maneuvered like a bus.

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    • According to Wikipedia, they have these advantages:
      Compared to Streetcars - 1. The overall system can be installed at a lower cost since existing trolleybus wires can be used without the installation of tracks, 2. Rubber tyres give significantly more traction than steel wheels, and so can be used to climb steeper hills.
      Compared to Buses - 1. The use of a guidance rail allows GLT vehicles running in parallel lanes to pass closer together than drivers could safely steer. 2. They can also draw up to level, tram-like platforms that allow for easier boarding, and give access to passengers dependent on wheelchairs without requiring the time-consuming deployment of ramps or ‘kneeling’ systems

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    • The union wasn't having that! There is a driver for safety reasons. They've had to evacuate the trains a few times in the past and the driver is there for that.

    • I see, ok, that's good I guess... thanks for the info :)

  • Do you mean like this in Sheffield, UK? It's a tram, with overhead pick-ups.

    thetrams.co.uk/.../original.jpg

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    • No, almost every tram has overhead pick-ups, I mean... it's a tram, but with rubber tyres - like a trolleybus.

  • I've seen them in Switzerland. Definitely in Geneva.

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  • I can't say that I have seen them, but I have heard of them.

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  • WTF, such things really exist?

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  • Never heard of that, but I've heard of some sort of Trams on tyres... in France allegedly.

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  • Never heard of such vehicle... who makes them, what country?

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