Did your parents teach you that being gay was wrong, something neutral or somethig good?

For those who have nothing against members of the LGBTI community, did your parents teached you to be accpeting of it or did they tell you it was bad, but you found out by yourself that it wasn't anything wrong with it?

My parents never teached me that it was a good thing, nor did they tell me it was a bad thing. Personally i support it and see nothing wrong with it

  • My parents teached me that it was something good
    7% (2)6% (2)7% (4)Vote
  • My parents teached me that it was something bad, but i dont personally see anything bad about it
    22% (6)19% (6)21% (12)Vote
  • My parents didn't tell me it was bad nor good
    67% (18)61% (19)64% (37)Vote
  • Results
    4% (1)14% (4)8% (5)Vote
And you are? I'm a GirlI'm a Guy

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Most Helpful Guy

  • My parents taught me to be tolerant and accepting - but not only towards homosexual people but towards people in general. I don't think it was ever a really big issue. Partially because I come from Switzerland and the culture towards homosexuality is quite different here than for example in America. There are no big public or political debates held about homosexuality and the media doesn't say much about it either. It's just culturally expected that you are accepting of gay people. People who are hateful against gays usually get shunned by their social environment, rather than being able to start some kind of public flame war like in the US. I don't think I ever even wondered whether being gay is right or wrong when I was a teenager because it was just clear that it was a good thing. It seemed ridiculous to think there could be something wrong about it. I also can't remember kids on the school yard being hateful against potentially gay kids... there are other issues we have here such as nationality-based racism but homosexuality was always kind of a non-topic in a good sense.

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Most Helpful Girl

  • They never mentioned it.

    A few years ago, however, at dinner, my mother, for some unknown reason or other, literally stood up, announced that she would be okay if her children married a person outside their race or someone of their own gender, or both, and sat back down.

    As I am the only one of dating age in my family and as I am currently with someone who is male and happens to be white, I told her that she'll probably have to wait for my siblings to start dating before she can get her homosexual interracial couple in the family.

    Homosexuality was just something I was expected to accept. My parents have gay and lesbian friends. They never made a point to sit me down and explain it in a sensitive way or anything, they'd just be like, "Our friend, Laura is getting married!" And I'd be like, "Oh good, who's the lucky guy?" and they'd be like, "Her name is Susan." And I was just expected to accept that.

    And I did.

    There was no special education acceptance talk. It was just expected that I accept that some girls like girls and some boys like boys and that's how it is.

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What Guys Said 12

  • Came from a fairly Christian household. Homosexuality was a sin, but I totally disconnected from Christianity once I began to apply real morals to it. Like people who hurt others can go to heaven if they accept Jesus, but the guy out every day helping others who happens to fancy himself a guy is going to hell? I'd rather be with the person who has the strong character roasting in hell.
    I decided the moral system of the Christian faith just wasn't for me. And I began to realize that the only thing that makes a person a homosexual is if they have sex with someone of the opposite gender. It has no baring on your character whatsoever, and that's all I care about when it comes to people.
    If I was a benevolent and loving God, that's what I'd care about. Who the person was when they came to me. Not if they believed in my existence, or who they let touch their genitals, or if they obeyed me unquestionably. But rather if they strengthened their character and loved their fellow human beings and creation.

    If there is a Christian God, and I am sent to hell for not believing in him, I know I will still be in good company when I am sent away.

    Tangent aside, I learned homosexuality is just simply a random design in this world that cannot be changed. It's just something that is, like people who are color blind or need have a pet dog their whole life.

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  • My dad was less than enthusiastic about the LGBT community growing up. I'm embarrassed to admit that I kind of followed in his footsteps in that regard until late in high school. My mom was always more accepting so she put the other side of it in my head. Really it just came down to me making gay friends that made me realize they're people just like me who just have a different preference.

    It's interesting because my parents always raised me to be racially sensitive. To recognize the beauty in everyone and to read between the lines so as to not be brainwashed into a particular way of thinking. It's just weird that it didn't always extend into the LGBT community. My dad would have no problem if I brought home a black or Asian woman or whatever but I think he would have an issue if I was gay.

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  • My parents didn't teach me anything about homosexuality, BUT my brother taught me that homosexuality is a terrible sin and he would disown me if he ever found out that I was gay.

    Of course, I'm not gay whatsoever, BUT it contributed to my initial hostility towards anything that could have been considered "gay" or make me seem like I was "gay", it impeded my friendships and it contributed to me trying to seem "more masculine" so that no one would think I'm "one of those fags".

    Apparently people still assumed I was gay because I was wearing a scarf , and all this got me was a few years of bitter bigotry and emotional immaturity and a complete disconnect from my emotional awareness; a severe blow to my emotional intelligence. How wonderful. I'd definitely recommend it to anyone as a guide on "how to be a shitty human being", I had to learn empathy from a book afterwards.

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    • And maybe you're still not 100% over it. "Of course I am not gay whatsoever" --> I also hear this sentence a lot from American guys. Interestingly, I practically never hear it here in western Europe (at least not in my country). It seems like in the US or in many eastern Europeans countries, men are still very sceptical about gays even if they claim to be totally accepting of them. There seems to be this incredible need by some guys to always make sure eeeeveryone knows for certain that they are OF COURSE certainly by no means even in the slightest tiny bit gay. I've never quite understood this. It doesn't seem really accepting to me. Personally, I really don't care whether people think I'm gay or not. If people assume I'm gay, that's fine by me because I can't see anything wrong with being gay. It's like if people assume I'm French or British although I'm Swiss... no problem, cuz I don't have anything against French people or Brits. There was a really great meme I saw the other day on

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    • men don't usually wear scarves in your country?

    • @thewanderingme Apparently it was too warm for it to be "normal" clothing to wear, so they assumed it was an accessory, which a guy would wear only if he is trying to be overly fashionable which typically means that they are gay.

      Apparently.

  • It's interesting.

    I don't think they approve, and I think they were against gay marriage, yet they almost never spoke about it.

    Like they never considered we would be gay, so it's not like they were saying 'don't screw other men!'. So while the answer might have been B, ended up more like C.

    I said they were against gay marriage. I don't know that they still are. I think they may be part of the big mass of people who went from 'it's sinful' to 'gay people are gay and that's just how they are, so if they're living in a good way, that's good'

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  • I honestly don't remember my parents specifically saying it was bad but I remember a lot of "oh gross" kinds of reactions if there was ever a gay kiss or something on TV.

    We all used to crack gay jokes and stuff sometimes too so I couldn't say they taught me that it was normal or good.

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  • I voted C. My parents never talked much about non-heterosexuality. But I can tell vibe wise that they don't dig that lifestyle, especially my dad.

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  • My mom was like: "If u don't like lesbians then u don't like partying!"

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  • I remember asking my mom once why she didn't like gay people when I was little. "Because God says its a sin and they'll go to hell" she said. Then I asked her when he said that. She didn't answer that one

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  • Kind of limited the options there. What about being taught it was bad and thinking it was bad. I don't like it. I'm not going to victimise anybody for it but I don't want them near me either

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  • My parents didn't day it was bad persay. They did tell me it was wrong and a sin, but they followed with that I shouldn't treat them any different. In general my parents taught me to accept everyone for who they are.

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  • My parents taught me that we all have our own problems and I should be as kind as possible to everyone.
    The kind part didn't really sink in, but the we all have problems part definitely did.

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  • My parents didn't tell me anything about and I see it as something unnatural and disgusting.

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    • well you obviously can't read either

    • While browsing main page, I generally read the title. If it's clear enough (and has a vote), reading the main text isn't that relevant.

What Girls Said 7

  • My parents never liked it!

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  • My parents taught me that the word "teached" isn't a thing, and they also told me that homosexuality is wrong and a choice and that one should hate the sin and not the sinner (they're Christians). I on the other hand know that it isn't a choice, it's not something that's wrong or evil, and I too believe that "teached" is not a word.

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  • They were in the middle about it, never really saying much. Someone's sexuality is of no concern to me. If they're happy, that's what matters.

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  • I'm lucky my parents are so accepting or I'd be screwed

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  • That's a bit of a biased poll you have there. Anyways my parents never talked about it openly with me because gay people aren't anything special but whenever the topic of gay marriage came up my dad expressed that he didn't like that idea.

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  • they never really talked about it to me, it's something that i came to support on my own, especially after learning about how badly some people get treated for something that's not even anyone else's business.

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  • My aunt never said it was bad nor good. She has said she supports yet when I casually mentioned I was bisexual ( actually pansexual but didn't think she knew what that was) she flat out said 'No you're not'

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