Do you have a strong local accent?


0|0
41|28

Most Helpful Girl

  • Well, it's kind of complicated... I'm Tunisian and grew up in Saudi Arabia and now live in France, and my accent isn't local to any of those 3 countries lol, I have my own weird accent which mixes up Tunisian and French Accent when I speak in English.
    When I speak in French I don't have a strong accent, actually locals here usually think I was born in France, but sometimes, here and there my inner Foreigner side makes it's way back and they're like "oh I heard that, it's your little accent, so cute".
    When I speak in Arabic I have a mixture of Tunisian/Lebanese/Syrian accent lol since I grew up around Lebanese people.

    0|1
    0|0

Most Helpful Guy

What Girls Said 40

  • I'll just confess here. cI have a valley girl accent. I'm sorry I let all of you down.
    rack.2.mshcdn.com/.../Supernatural-Dean.gif

    0|1
    0|0
  • Nope, moved around so much that my accent has become one of a kind. 😌 And nobody can tell where tf Im from.

    1|1
    0|0
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Fmyk4jJTf8

    I'm not sure so I'll just post this lol.

    2|1
    0|0
  • I don't think I have a very strong accent. The people I know who aren't from where I live tell me I only have a slight southern accent.

    0|1
    0|0
    • Yeah yours isn't that southern if I remember correctly.

    • Show All
    • @doctorwhofan23 lol no, you probably haven't heard my voice.

    • Wonder if I'd think you have an accent

  • to the rest of the world, yeah. to my fellow aussies, probably not.

    1|1
    0|0
  • I have been told that I have a bit of a "twang", or what is known as a northern Missouri accent, but has been mistaken a lot for a southern accent. It is not very strong at all and in fact there are only a few words that it is even noticeable with, but most people don't notice it. There are a few words that they laugh at when I say them though.

    0|1
    0|0
  • I don't think so! I have an American accent.

    0|1
    0|0
  • No I've lived in Chicago all my life and do not sound like this when I speak:

    http://youtu.be/Ey6eFjRtO7Y

    0|1
    0|0
  • Not even a little bit, I'm not from where I currently live.

    0|1
    0|0
  • No I am from Canada and when I met my internet friend in California she kept getting me to say different words to try and hear my accent but she was disappointed because I don't really have one I guess.

    0|1
    0|0
  • Only when I'm tired or have been drinking.
    I have an intolerable accent when speaking chinese though.

    0|1
    0|0
  • Apparently not since I get asked where I from a lot lol. Most people I come across in my city will ask me if I'm from the south. And they're always surprised when I tell them I was born and raised here.

    0|1
    0|0
  • I might have an accent when I'm speaking English. But I don't think I have an accent when I'm speaking my native tongue.

    0|1
    0|0
  • my English is just alright and "understandeable" i guess

    0|1
    0|0
  • Nah, there's nothing that really stands out with my voice.

    0|1
    0|0
  • For English language, I do not have the Indian accent but sometimes (Just sometimes) my tongue slips because of influence of multiple native Indic languages I know.

    0|1
    0|0
  • No, my accent is one of the cleanest of our country

    0|1
    0|0
  • I don't know, but apparently I do according to some people here and some of my online friends lol

    0|1
    0|0
  • I don't think so. I live in N. Ontario & have lost track of the times I have been asked if I'm from the east.

    0|1
    0|0
  • Not as strong as it could be but it's definitely there

    0|1
    0|0
  • I have a California stoner type accent. I used to be a stoner.

    0|1
    0|0
  • I don't think I have an accent at all. Right @levin?

    0|1
    1|0
  • I have been told I have a Chicago accent.
    They way I say my 'a's. Lol

    0|1
    0|0
  • nope
    I have no idea what accent I have it s screwed up

    0|1
    0|0
  • No I don't have a thick New York accent

    0|1
    0|0
  • Not at all, I've even been asked if I'm from here

    0|1
    0|0
  • Not really. It's there but it's not strong.

    0|1
    0|0
  • Well yeah, I sound pretty British

    0|1
    0|0
  • I'm from Pittsburgh, but no, I do not. 😛

    0|1
    0|0
  • I have a little bit of a French accent.

    0|1
    0|0
  • More from Girls
    10

What Guys Said 27

  • When I speak English, I have hardly any foreign accent (this is what I consider "accent"). Because I've lived in the US, I almost sound like an American. I've actually had Americans get really surprised that I'm not American ;-). One guy didn't want to believe me until I spoke in my native tongue. Americans have also been very good at guessing where I've lived in the US (Pennsylvania mostly). This means that I probably did pick up some east coast or Pennsylvania dialect features.
    As for my mother tongue, it's actually quite hard to tell. The reason for this lies in the unique political (and linguistic) situation of my country. Contrary to practically all other countries in the world, Switzerland doesn't have a standard language or standard variety. For example in Britain they have RP (BBC-English). In Germany, they have "Schriftdeutsch" roughly translatable as High German. In Italy, they have the Rome-Italian etc. All these standard varieties are usually spoken by a small minority of the population. In the case of Germany, it's actually an artificial concept. Schriftdeutsch doesn't even exist. Nobody talks like that in real life. And yet, it's considered the norm. In Switzerland, we don't have a standard variety. We only have tons of different dialects. Everyone talks the way he/she naturally does. So for example when you're a host on national TV, you don't have to change your speech because there's no standard variety. You just talk the way you would anyway. The reason I'm saying this is because the lack of a standard variety makes it hard to tell whether I have a strong local dialect or not because there's not "standard" I could compare it with. It's not like in England where you can say "oh, compared to RP you sound very nasal" or something like that. So it's really quite hard to judge. I would say that people can usually guess what part of the country I come from (north-east) but I don't think they can pinpoint the exact region.

    0|1
    0|0
    • When I went to Switzerland we flew to Geneva, which is french speaking (as if you dont know that lol), and made our way through round the otherside of the lake and into the Valais canton where it switched to German, or merged, I dont really know which. When we arrived in Saas Fee, we learned they spoke Swiss German, some strange german offshoot but they still say things like Merci!

    • @26ukdude Yes, that's correct. As for the change from French to Swiss German, it's more of a merging than an abrupt switching. Even in our capital Bern, which is quite a long way from the Romandie (French part of Switzerland) many people are still very fluent at French. As you travel eastwards, this number slowly goes down. We all have many years of mandatory French in school (for me it was 8 years) but being relatively far away from the Romandie, it's just hard to actually keep your French skills after you leave school because there's nobody to use it with. However, as you correctly said, we all use quite a lot of French still in Swiss (in all regions), which is part of the reason Germans from Germany don't understand us. These words such as "merci" (G. "Danke"), "Trottoir" (sidewalk, G. "Gehsteig") or "Perron" (train platform, G. "Bahnsteig") are not considered foreign anymore, because they've been integrated in the language for such a long time. Swiss German itself is linguistically

    • speaking a "high allemannic variety". Like Dutch, it split off from general middle high German around the 13th century. And like Dutch, is has remained relatively unchanged over the centuries (Dutch has changed a bit more than Swiss, which is why it has become more different from German). So it may sound funny but when you hear Swiss German, you're actually time travelling in a way. You basically hear what German people must have sounded like (more or less) around 700 years ago. In fact, one direct proof for this are the Amish people in the US. I've lived for some time in Pennsylvania and one time I went to visit the Amish. As it so happens, the large majority of the original Amish came from Switzerland (some also from Germany and the Netherlands). For fun, I've tried to talk to the Amish lady in the gift shop in my own Swiss German dialect and amazingly, she could understand me and responded in her own, 400-year old Swiss which I too, was able to understand :-).

  • Nobody is ever confused about where I'm from once I start talking, haha
    http://youtu.be/azM6xSTT2I0

    This dude is my heroπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ I was born in the North End, never got the sweet gang jacket thoughπŸ˜•
    http://youtu.be/Kmum-eT4hzM

    0|1
    0|0
  • No, I don't. It's a normal accent from my region, but it's not strong. If you were Brazilian you could realize that I'm from the Southeast, living in the "interior" (that's how we say) of the state of SΓ£o Paulo, but probably you won't realize it if you just speak Portuguese or if you live far away in another region and don't know the southern accents.

    0|1
    0|0
  • Colin Farrell is from same city as I am
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KoE9edjEDCI

    1|1
    0|0
  • i have not much of a strong local accent and i don't know why, i pronounce words correctly and have always done and only use slang in jokes, prob why everyone thinks i sound like a posh British guy >.<

    0|1
    0|0
  • It's not that strong but I do have a unique regional accent. People in Texas made fun of me for it 😔

    "Fuhget about it!" I heard that a million times from drunk Texans lol

    1|1
    0|0
  • I have a standard RP British accent. So I dont sound like im from a particular region, its just regular English. To northeners I do sound different, because im a southener, but I basically sound like a BBC presenter haha, not the queen, thats just posh.

    0|1
    0|0
    • And although I grew up in Norwich, thankfully, (probably because my parents aren't from there), I dont have a Norfolk accent.

  • No because my local accent is neither southern nor northern it's kind of a neutral accent that is in the middle while I have a strong southern/country accent.

    0|1
    0|0
  • Talked to people overseas.

    They be screaming at my New Zealand accent.

    2|1
    0|0
  • Nope, mixed with English/South African

    1|1
    0|0
    • Wow. Neat combination

    • Show All
    • No i still live in the south. Im just told that I sound like a white person lol. When i was younger they said I sound like a country white person and now im just a plain old white person haha

    • @DesiDoo haha 😂 I have no idea what a "white accent" is xD

  • In everyday interactions I can sound very Californian, yeah.

    0|1
    0|0
  • I have a neutral accent called "Rikssvenska". But the local accent where I live is probably equivalent to the New Yorker accent.

    0|1
    0|0
  • Yes, I have a strong accent in german and English.

    0|1
    0|0
  • Not really, I live in Conneticut so apart from some made-up slang between friends I'm pretty neutral.

    0|1
    0|0
  • I have the most non-accent ever.

    0|1
    0|0
  • I'm from Yorkshire, but I don't have a strong accent. People say I have a slight northern accent.

    0|1
    0|0
  • Linguistically speaking, People from the lower Midwestern US have the most neutral accents.

    0|1
    0|0
  • Accent, yes, it's clear where I'm from. But I don't really use the local vocabulary at all.

    As far as English goes, I sound like a mixture of some British dialects.

    0|1
    0|0
  • yes, strong Irish accent

    0|1
    0|0
  • I definitely have one, but don't know if I would call it "strong".

    0|1
    0|0
  • Every now and then people I know from out of state will say I do, but I don't hear it.

    0|1
    0|0
  • I'm told i have a "radio voice"...

    0|1
    0|0
  • My accent is a mix of Eminem and Busta Rhymes.

    0|1
    0|0
  • I can mimic almost all accents in my country

    0|1
    0|0
  • Naturally I dont but it changed a bit the last couple of years.

    0|1
    0|0
  • I have a strong local accent in one of the local languages---the one I learned late in life!

    In the other local language, the one I learned at home, I have a foreign accent (I grew up outside the country I live in now)

    0|1
    0|0
  • Like a lot Newfoundlanders, I probably have a strong local accent. If you don't know what the accent sounds like, watch a bit of the video below. I find it funny that they have it captioned even though they're speaking English.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39BSnDCOsX8

    0|1
    1|0
Loading...