Can you identify every type of word in an English sentence?

Seeing as how I think the majority of people here have English as their native language it should be easy. So take this for example.

There was novelty in the scheme, and as, with such a mother and such uncompanionable sisters, home could not be faultless, a little change was not unwelcome for its own sake.

You would say that "scheme" is a noun, and "and as" is a conjunction.


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Most Helpful Guy

  • Well, I major in English linguistics (and English literature), so I think I should be pretty decent at this. I've had to do tons of these exercises. However, I'm not a native English speaker, so forgive me if I make a mistake :-).
    Let's give it a try:
    There --> adverb
    was --> verb, 3. p singular, past simple
    novelty --> noun, nominative
    in --> preposition
    the --> definite article
    scheme --> noun, nominative
    and --> conjunction word
    as --> errr... adverb I think? Forms a conjunction phrase with "and"
    with --> preposition
    such --> adverb
    a --> indefinite article
    mother --> noun, dative
    and --> conjunction word
    such --> adverb
    uncompanionable --> adjective, positive
    sisters --> noun, dative, plural
    home --> noun, nominative
    could --> verb, 3p, singular, past simple (could also be conditional but that's a mood, not a tense)
    not --> adverb
    be --> verb, indicative
    faultless --> adjective, positive
    a --> indefinite article
    little --> adjective, positive
    change --> noun, nominative
    was --> verb, 3. p singular, past simple
    not --> adverb
    unwelcome --> adverb
    for --> preposition... I think?
    its --> possessive pronoun
    own --> here: adjective
    sake --> noun, nominative

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What Guys Said 3

  • No way for me. Don't know the differences. And don't see how knowing them helps. I can write great essays because I took an "Essay Writing" class in 11th grade with a great teacher, but which word is a noun and which is an adverb, I don't know.

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  • The problem arises becuase most English grammar is based on Latin, as if the words were translated to Latin, identified and then put back in the sentence. "Was not unwelcome" is what, an adverbial phrase?

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  • I didn't do too well on my college English; I only got about 70%

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    • Then again, my English teacher is a hard marker and was only giving about 60%-70% mark total for all the assignments and my classmate that is a straight A student, got 73% in her class, but of course the final boosted her mark to 80% since she got 92% on her final and I got 88% on mine.

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