Is the corporate life suffocating?

Why would someone want to work mad hours in a week when they could just start their own business OR if that's not realistic, invest in a business?

Because of what people would think?

I think it's important to work etc. but they overdo it


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Most Helpful Guy

  • Because it's a nice lifestyle that is reasonably guaranteed (compared to starting a business especially). It's fun in some ways too, I like my job as a management consultant. It's obviously not my dream job but I feel valued helping to solve real-world complex business issues, work with many people, meet others, use my technical skills and analytical ability, etc.

    But yea I see what you mean, the first firm I started out with after uni I worked 80 hours a week in the office and I wanted to physically assault all my co-workers lol. It was pure hell, and my social life and everything really suffered.

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    • That must've been something working those kind of hours when you were in your early twenties.

      What are your hours like in comparison as a consultant? And the million dollar question: what would be your dream job?

      Something I don't entirely understand, is right outside of school everyone wants to work for these high-profile companies, Mckinsey, the investment banks etc. but they're the ones that usually over-work their employees.

      Why are people so averse with taking a reasonable job with less pay but at least some chance at enjoying life? Is it because it's not the so-called 'smart person's' thing to do?

      I never understood it. How can one actually be happy at receiving such a position it would be such a catch-22 situation where on the one hand you're thinking yay I received an offer and on the other it's like... fuck my life lol

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    • Oh okay, yeah I can't speak to placement in Canada as I'm unfamiliar with that. But just to put it in perspective, I could never even get a foot in the door at McKinsey, but I was good enough to interview at a few global consulting and advisory firms, small investments banks, and the infamous Google.

    • One of the guys I knew who worked at Mckinsey (a different one), I was casually talking to him about how my cousins were placed at a top public University in the U. S. (the business school). And he was talking about how his Canadian school didn't really stop him from getting any opportunities, but given the opportunity to go to the U. S. business school, he'd still go.

      I was like... wait a minute, if he could get into Mckinsey wouldn't it be a given that he could get into a public institution?

      Plus on wallstreet oasis I read about how all these people who broke into Mckinsey did all kinds of super-human being kind of things, but the guy I knew who broke into Mckinsey did his internship at a tech start-up which is not really that impressive.

      I don't think like I said it's a Mckinsey thing I'm pretty sure most Canadian offices of all these multi-national companies are easier to get into.

      That being said, Google... intriguing. Tech is a different world altogether

Most Helpful Girl

  • I work 9 to 5. I make 90k doing not that much work. Corporate is working out fine for me thank you.

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    • Really? Which industry.

What Guys Said 10

  • Corporate life suffocating (unpaid overtime) and treacherous (backstabbing)
    Investing in a business is a gamble. not everyone likes gambling his future.

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    • Hmm.

      Couldn't it be 50/50. Take a reasonable job, and then also invest on the side?

      Why take the 'best' job you could find, and work crazy (and I mean crazy) hours?

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    • Hmm well I'm thinking of people who are already rich and who have to have some profession because their family's money is not going to last forever.

      Tonnes of bankers already come from rich families to begin with, which is the real irony.

      I don't think necessarily they got to be entrepreneurs although I do realize that my post is worded so it sounds that way.

      It's more about having something really solid in their life to have income, via franchising, or dealing with property etc.

      I'm not even really sure what the point of money is if you can't enjoy it. I know it sounds naive, but it's sort of true.

    • Asker
      The majority of people are NOT already rich and have to have some profession because they can't count on family's money.
      The majority of people are starting in life with either no money at all (the lucky ones) or with a study debt of thousands of $$$.
      People without money can't start a business. A company lacking sufficient capital is a formula for disaster, a prey for the banks.
      People with debts usually don't want to get more debts to start a business. Thus working as an employee is the logical way. Once your savings are large enough (or when you inherit some money you can think about launching a business.

  • They do it because in the West we're materialistic consumers who want to fit in while standing out -- while attaining 'status' (whatever the fuck that means).

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  • Plenty of people try. Then they go on those stupid journeys to "find themselves", end up drinking their own piss and have their malnourished corpses found in the middle of nowhere.
    Who was that bloke actually? The one that abandoned money and tried to journey the world and ended up starving to death when he realised that money is sort of important? God he was dumb.

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  • Low-brow corporate work rarely, if ever, has many overtime hours. Higher-end positions come with it or critical positions and functions but even then it simply isn't that bad. When it gets suffocating is the Google experience where they have on-site day care so they can push you even harder than before while "putting your mind at ease" about being a parent because fuck your children, get to work.

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    • Ha ha.

      I always thought it was the other way around. That you start off doing mad hours and then eventually it gets a little better.

    • No, not at all, it gets significantly worse.

  • It's not work to me, I love what I do and wouldn't trade it for anything else at the moment. As for starting my own business. Yeah, the potential returns are higher, but often times the investment in time commitment is much higher to get it off the ground and it is usually doing the grunt work that I'd rather not do. Lastly, investing in a business is always a gamble because it's a very inexact science and you literally have no control of the variables.

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  • i would just work half time and invest my time into learning financial skills to be able to invest in the stock market.

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  • Everyone's goals are different. Not everyone is suited to be an entrepreneur nor do some people want to trust their money in other people-s businesses.

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  • It's a risky life

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  • They're stupid or too busy/stressed to think outside the treadmill.

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    • This is what I've secretly always believed. Maybe not entirely the stupid part, but that their decisions are motivated by what ist he norm

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    • Most corporate people are smart at least to an extent. Sometimes I wonder if they ARE happy, as in they would be more miserable if their brain wasn't being used for something.

      I remember having a love for language arts/literature growing up. I used to do ridiculously well, even won awards as a child and in high school.

      But I just got over it in University. I didn't feel 'less' smart just because I got a so-so grade on one of my English classes electives because it had nothing to do with my major. I was done with that phase of my life.

      I wonder if 'smart' people in the most conventional sense (good at Math, sharp etc.) experience this too, where initially it is important for them to do what they like, find a good job that uses their brain etc. and over time they realize this is all about the money anyways, and just adhere to that lifestyle

    • It's possible. But then I'm an old man. I'm 45.

  • Everybody thinks they can run a business but really it requires a very unusual skill set. Most small businesses fail (8 out of 10 in the first 18 months) because the management isn't up to the task.

    Living off investment requires a lot of money to start and a lot of savvy about investing not to lose it. If you sit down to a hand of cards and don't see any suckers at the table, then it's you.

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    • Hmm.

      There are SO many things that can be done to guarantee additional income while maintaining a full-time job. Why not take a reasonable job with reasonable hours, and invest in property/land, in addition to something like a franchise that guarantees constant income?

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