What was one of your most defining moments in life?


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Most Helpful Girl

  • Moving to another city with my "BFF" so we can live and work together. Then caching her talking behind my back, spreading rumors about me and was behaving so rude toward me. And when I finally had enough and decided to move out of our shared apartment she told me the reason for her behavior. And it is a boy. He's just a friend but she thought we're together and did all this because she likes him. I haven't seen her or heard from her for a year now. Me and the boy are still talking, but we are not that close friends anymore. He know about everything that happened. He and this girl were never together.

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    • I wouldn't let a woman come between me and my BFF, I wouldn't consider her as being a best friend, jealousy is a dangerous thing

    • I know that now. I'm trying to not get that close to anyone now. It was really hard ( for me at least) when I decided to move out and cut communication with her. She was like a sister to me.

Most Helpful Guy

  • One I can spontaneously think of:
    When I was a child in elementary school, I think I was just mildly racist. I don't think I was actually convinced by any racist ideas but I was basically repeating racist things that older kids in my school were saying. My parents are both very liberal and open-minded, so it must have come from school. The thing is that I grew up in the 90s and the 1990s were a very defining period in Switzerland's history in relation to foreigners. Before that, we were a pretty homogenous country. We did have a lot of Italians and some Greek and Spanish guest workers who had come during the 1960s but they were all pretty similar to us and had been integrated for a long time. Now it was the 1990s and the war in Kosovo brought hundreds of thousands, if not millions of people from the Balkan to western Europe (as refugees). Within just a few years, the society of my country suddenly became very mixed with foreigners (who also had a very different culture and mentality and sometimes a different religion) and many Swiss people struggled a lot to accept this. My school in particular became a big melting pot. Looking back, it was actually a cool thing. One of my best friends was Croatian, another good friend was from Austria and another friend from Italy. But one thing that united all the Swiss children with the Spanish and German and Austrian and Italian (etc.) children was their antipathy towards the new kids from the Balkan. Those Albanians and Serbs sounded aggressive and many times they WERE very aggressive (many of them had suffered severe traumas from the war). There were a lot of stories going around about Albanian kids beating up other kids and so, we started to have this divide between the nationalities. I was only 10 and I doubt I really understood the whole thing. All I knew was that there was a boy from Serbia in my class who constantly bullied and terrorized other kids on their way home and I knew that older children (from 5th and 6th grade) said that those Balkan kids are complete assholes.
    So one day I was walking home and I started talking to these two boys. They both seemed really nice and kids I wanted to become friends with. Suddenly, this Serbian boy from my class appeared out of nowhere and started to bully me. I was terrified of him because I'm almost blind and can't defend myself physically. I almost started crying, when unexpectedly, the other boys stood up for me and told him to fuck off. He first wanted to...

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    • ... fight them but they were two and he was alone. Plus, one of my new friends was quite tall and chubby for his age... not somebody you'd mess with ;-). So the Serbian boy yelled some insults and finally took a hike. I calmed down a bit and then started a rant about those Balkan kids (basically repeating all the stuff I had heard from other children). I angrily said how those kids from Albania and Serbia should just all fuck off and go back and die in their stupid war and leave Switzerland alone and dumb things like that. My two friends remained silent and listened to me patiently. Once I was done ranting, the bigger of the two just looked at me, grinned and said "Uhm, you should maybe know that we're from Albania". I was completely stunned. I didn't know what to say. I realized what an ass I had made out of myself. After that I went home and thought about the whole experience long and hard. It was an extremely defining moment for me because I realized how stupid stereotypes and

    • generalizations are. I realized that racism made absolutely no sense whatsoever. Because you can always meet some idiots from another country but for every idiot you meet, you'll meet two awesome, nice guys who'll protect you. Eventually, I lost contact with those two boys but I'm still thankful today for what they taught me. That experience made me into a much more mature, rational and most of all, open-minded person.

What Girls Said 2

  • Probably having the guts to approach my crush for the first time. That was this year in May. In school I was always the shy timid girl who never talked much and stuck to her studies, kept to herself. This year was a time for change both mentally and emotionally. Talking to someone I barely knew, let alone it being my crush makes me feel like I can accomplish anything! :)

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  • Fortunately blessed with no regrets in life. So there's nothing I would really do differently.

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What Guys Said 4

  • 5 days ago (WOW, already?) when I told my crush I like her.
    I've never told a girl I liked her before, never asked one on a date (just hangouts).
    So yeah.

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  • The moment I looked into @LaVilaine 's eyes. It was beautiful

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  • Becoming vegetarian.

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  • today

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