They're, there, their, is it really so hard?

They're = they are
There = not here
Their = belonging to them

  • I always get it right, but it doesn't bother me when I read it.
    12% (2)42% (5)24% (7)Vote
  • I always get it right, why can't everyone else?
    71% (12)50% (6)62% (18)Vote
  • Grammar/spelling doesn't matter.
    6% (1)0% (0)3% (1)Vote
  • Why should I bother? You know what I mean.
    11% (2)8% (1)11% (3)Vote
And you are? I'm a GirlI'm a Guy

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Most Helpful Girl

What Girls Said 6

  • Yr second option is a run-on sentence. #instantkarma

    Hey... You're 51. That gives you at least twenty or thirty more years to quit being a killjoy and actually... y'know... ENGAGE with people.
    First day of the rest of yr life, and all that.

    <3 <3
    :*

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  • My problem is my computer needing cleaning and auto correct. My computer keys are acting up as well. That includes when using the mobile app.

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  • It's hard to believe someone gets it right every single time. I use the correct form most times, but sometimes I mess up. Personally, it's a pet peeve if it's done allll the time because it's really not that hard. Not sure which poll option to pick.

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  • I'm with you. It's not that hard to determine the differences between all three of those.

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  • I can be a grammar nazi sometimes...

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  • I am the only one who do write correctly and I speak French all the time. 😭😭😭😂

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What Guys Said 6

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  • I'm not a native English speake and my English may be supbar, but these rules I do happen to understand fully. But I frequently have misshaps with the ussage of 'a' and 'an'. Not entirely sure as to where to use each of them.
    So if I were to get that down then my writing and speaking would at least be Middle School level, or somewhere in that area of expertise and understanding.

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    • 1mo

      It's not very difficult either:
      'a' when the next word begins with a consonant.
      'an' when the next begins with a vowel, excepts with most of the words beginning with of 'u', e. g. a union.
      It's just to make pronunciation easier and more fluent, a apple sounds much worse and difficult than an apple.

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    • 1mo

      Oh, I didn't think you disagreed @goaded. In fact I think it was good that you pointed that out. I just love the English language (though I'm not from an English speaking country) and I think sometimes people find it difficult (and some even hates to learn it) only because no one teaches them some easy things. It also has difficult things, like every language, but I would love it if most of people enjoyed learning it like I did (and still do).
      By the way, I don't know how to pronounce Bicester either and worst of all: I don't even know what it is :)

    • 1mo

      @larmaint Bicester is a town in England. So is Chester, and Leicester, pronounced (roughly) Chester and lester. Bicester is pronounced bister, I don't think I've ever been there.

      Chiswick is chisick, and Woolwich, woolich. Unlike Germany, we don't update spellings on a regular basis, which must upset the dictionary business. :)

  • When I think about it I understand it but sometimes I will make mistakes if I am typing fast or don't proofread what I wrote.

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  • I am dutch with dyslexia and even i know this lol.

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  • No, there easy :P

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  • Your pedantic.

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    • 1mo

      I feel a very similar question coming on... :)

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