What’s the difference between BJJ and Judo?


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Most Helpful Guy

  • I love this question! Since I train jiujitsu lol. In a nutshell, judo focuses on standup takedowns and BJJ focuses on submitting once on the ground. In a NUTSHELL. You can go more specifically into the differences of course

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Most Helpful Girl

  • Mainly that Judo training starts from standing position and ends with ippon when one contestant's back hits floor, while in Brazilian jujitsu the training continues on the ground until finalization of a technique, like levers (or locks?)
    I know it because I practice martial arts with friends that know judo and bjj, but mine is hapkido and taekwondo

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What Guys Said 4

  • She was pretty good.. She kept gettin him in locks.. LOL.. That's all I wanted to say.. Everybody else answered yo question XD

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  • In a nutshell..

    Judo- Better at bringing the fight to the ground.
    BJJ- Better at fighting on the ground.

    So it's really about early vs late game advantage.

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  • Judo is a standing defensive art based counter striking (your opponent strikes first)
    BJJ is a ground art in the form of grappling as opposed to striking

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  • Judo focusses on standing grapples and holds while Brazilian just jitsu focusses more on submitting your opponent on the ground.

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What Girls Said 1

  • I asked this of my friend who has his something degree black belt in traditional Jujitsu. He said, the main difference is Gracie style Jiu-Jitsu built on traditional Jujitsu by doing a great deal more to develop floor techniques so it became even more of a wrestling style grappling sport. I can't tell you more than that. It's about all the detail I know.

    Here is a simple description of Jujitsu

    Jujutsu (/dʒuːˈdʒuːtsuː/ joo-JOOT-soo; Japanese: 柔術, jūjutsu About this sound listen (help·info)) is a Japanese martial art and a method of close combat for defeating an armed and armored opponent in which one uses no weapon or only a short weapon.[1][2]

    "Jū" can be translated to mean "gentle, soft, supple, flexible, pliable, or yielding." "Jutsu" can be translated to mean "art" or "technique" and represents manipulating the opponent's force against himself rather than confronting it with one's own force.[1] Jujutsu developed to combat the samurai of feudal Japan as a method for defeating an armed and armored opponent in which one uses no weapon, or only a short weapon.[3] Because striking against an armored opponent proved ineffective, practitioners learned that the most efficient methods for neutralizing an enemy took the form of pins, joint locks, and throws. These techniques were developed around the principle of using an attacker's energy against him, rather than directly opposing it.

    Judo is a different martial art, but like all of the Japanese martial arts, there are many similarities.

    Judo (柔道 jūdō, meaning "gentle way") was created as a physical, mental and moral pedagogy in Japan, in 1882, by Jigoro Kano (嘉納治五郎). It is generally categorized as a modern martial art which later evolved into a combat and Olympic sport. Its most prominent feature is its competitive element, where the objective is to either throw or takedown an opponent to the ground, immobilize or otherwise subdue an opponent with a pin, or force an opponent to submit with a joint lock or a choke. Strikes and thrusts by hands and feet as well as weapons defenses are a part of judo, but only in pre-arranged forms (kata, 形) and are not allowed in judo competition or free practice (randori, 乱取り). A judo practitioner is called a judoka.

    The philosophy and subsequent pedagogy developed for judo became the model for other modern Japanese martial arts that developed from koryū (古流, traditional schools).

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