I Still Live in a State Where Religious Laws Are Enforced

I don't drink alcohol at all, and never have, so there had never been a personal need for me to buy alcohol before the fateful day on the eve of my Mother's birthday party. My dad and I were planning a big surprise party for her and all our family and friends, and on a last minute run for supplies, he asked me to go pick up a bottle of her favorite wine. So I got to the store bright and early that Sunday morning, flustered, trying to run and pick up all the supplies.

I get to the counter, and the cashier looks at me and says, "you cannot purchase this." I looked at her and said, "oh, sorry, yeah, I forgot to hand you my I.D., (I mean, I'd never done this, right) where is it, okay, here you go." She looks at me and says, "no, I'm sorry, you cannot purchase this right now...it's Sunday." Already being hurried, I was just plain confused as to what the hell she was talking about. Sunday? What had Sunday got to do with anything? But then after a few more confused seconds it occurred to me exactly where I lived, and why this was happening on a Sunday, and why I couldn't buy the bottle right now. Son of a...

In the United States, there are still 12 States that continue to cling to Prohibition-era Blue Laws banning Sunday liquor sales. They include: Alabama, Indiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia. Although the article below references Canada's old Sunday Laws, the laws in the US in the past were almost identical. Now-a-days, the current laws mostly prohibit:

1. the sale of alcohol before noon on Sunday--almost universal in these states

2. car dealerships cannot sell cars on Sunday (they must be closed)

3. In some places your naughty bedroom toys cannot be sold on Sunday

4. Gun hunting may be prohibited in certain areas on Sunday

5. The selling of hardware/machinery

(Example of old Sunday laws in parts of Canada almost identical to old US laws that took effect on Sundays).

Most of the modern laws, nay all of them, actually have no real effect on me unless of course my mother has another Sunday birthday, but it's just strange to me that these are still enforced BY LAW. We say we live in a country where there is freedom of religion, but these laws are meant to clearly enforce one religions idea of what being faithful means by not working on the Sabbath or drinking on the Sabbath yet everywhere else you look around, nothing is closed (unless it's Chik-fil-A or Hobby Lobby) on Sundays, sports events happen all the time, there are stores that run 24/7, people are clearly working on Sundays and no one takes issue with it, unless of course you are a die hard about your specific religion.

It's weird and actually a bit unsettling sometimes to think that some religious organizations and politicians still have such a deep hold on certain parts of this country and would like nothing better than to go back to an age where people worshiped the one way and laws like this could actually legally be enforced. Of course, in modern times, there have been several organizations and groups who rise up now and again, to fight back against these laws, stating the obvious in that it hurts business, the laws are not equally enforced by all, it doesn't allow for other people to practice religion or lack of their own way, etc. and as a result several of the laws have been scaled back, thrown out, or altered.


0|6
1136

Most Helpful Guy

  • That's the amusing thing about right wingers. They bash Muslims for shariah law but many (not all but a large amount of them) want to turn America into a Christian Theocracy which mean America would be under the Christian version of Shariah law. Ted Cruz for example wants to outlaw gay marriage. Someone else I spoke to said the West needs to bring Christian values back because society is immoral. I said we're not a theocracy and with all of the violence and stupidity caused by theocracy that in of itself makes society immoral. People need to allow personal freedom as long as you don't interfere on other people's rights then you will make society moral that way and if someone's private life is immoral that's their business as long as no one else is affected the sooner people realize that the more society will be moral.

    4|3
    0|1

Join the discussion

What Guys Said 35

  • Damn Minnesota. Always gotta be ruining soemthing. Let me tell you being their neighonors isn't pleasant lol. I've had that instance on a Sunday where me and some friends wanted to have a few drinks during a Packer game and it was like wth?
    Its so dumb. I understand completely if you want to close on a Sunday or Saturday to have your employees actually have a weekend but to do it for religious reasons is unconstitutional. Freedom of religion, part of that is being any religion! Not just Christianity.

    1|0
    0|0
  • Alcohol is a privilege, not a right. And if you want to attack religion, you're barking up the wrong tree. Nowhere in the Bible does it say that one absolutely cannot ever have liquor on a Sunday.

    What is the commandment, boiled down to its simplest understanding?

    "We should fear and love God that we don't despise preaching or His Word, but gladly hear and learn it." - Luther's Small Catechism

    Probably the only one more disregarded today than that, is the prohibition on extramarital sex. (Because of today's insane belief that sex is a "right.")

    These prohibitions were clearly written for a different time period and culture. This wasn't just about the Sabbath. It was about the culture of the time in general, the need to make time for the family, and find constructive ways to keep it together and healthy. Vagabonds who were destructive to such family closeness could be easily weeded out by these laws as the deviants they were, and punished for the harm they caused to societal integrity.

    Due to years of successful assault on the very soul of the nation, Cultural Marxists have ebbed away that belief in cultural integrity to the point that the complete destruction of a family unit is now longer seen as the big deal that it actually still is. And the harm to children's development is treated with callous disregard, with a mindset of "pop them a pill and forget about it." (That is, until they get fed up with the pills, and start opening fire. Then, we blame the gun!)

    Most of these old man-made laws, whether or not they used religion as an excuse, made sense for their time. But in today's culture, their repeal makes equal sense. What they sought to defend has already been destroyed, so they are there to protect nothing.

    So why is the liquor law on Sunday refusing to die? Because there is nothing the state loves more than finding a loophole to keep a piece of Prohibition alive. Why? Because they really, really, REALLY love inventing excuses to put you in jail. But motivated by a very different religion: Secular Humanism.

    And let's face it: wherever there's a ton of Jack Daniels and Captain Morgan, the justice system sees dollar signs. Because drunks are undesirables, and that makes them easy targets.

    0|1
    0|1
  • I've wondered about this for years. I'm surprised it hasn't been struck down by the courts. Since it hasn't there is obviously a reason. The states obviously can make their own laws on alcohol. As far as I know the feds are not directly involved in any way other than alcohol being legal.

    I assume the states get by with it because it's not really much different than stopping sales after 1:00am or whatever.

    By the way, your list of states doesn't include Ohio which allows Sunday alcohol sales, but only if approved locally. So if not approved locally it can still be banned. The places where it's banned have a watered down low alcohol beer, but not normal beer, wine, or spirits. There are also places where it's completely dry.

    0|0
    0|0
    • You're quite right about Ohio.

  • I live in a state that still has blue laws, but interestingly allows alcohol sales on Sundays, after noon. No retail establishments can be open before noon. There are exceptions for pharmacies, grocery stores (stores can only sell groceries- any household goods still can't be sold), and gas stations, but otherwise all retail establishments are closed until noon. Restaurants and bars also cannot sell beer, wine, or liquor until 11am on Sundays, while every other day of the week sales of beer, wine, and liquor can start at 6am.

    0|0
    0|0
  • The actual reason for blue laws was the Old Testament Commandment to Keep Holy the Sabbath day. In the Jewish religion that is Saturday, in Christianity, it's Sunday, because supposedly Jesus rose from the dead on a Sunday. However, most Christians fail to understand that they don't need to obey the laws of the Sabbath, because those were Jewish laws to which Christians are not subject. However, "purist" sects, like the Puritans and Pilgrims, chose to adhere to all Biblical laws including the Old Testament as do most fundamentalist sects today.. So they chose specific activities which they felt were not appropriate on a "holy day of rest." Alcohol sales being primary. Although, there is no outright prohibition against moderate alcohol use in the Bible. In fact, as most people know, Jesus's first miracle was turning water into wine at a wedding feast. And I can assure you, it was alcoholic wine despite what some fundamentalists believe.
    As a lifelong Christian, I agree that Christian laws have no place in government. But I will say that Christian morality (not sexual) but social, love your neighbor as yourself, do unto others, etc, are the building blocks of most Western civilization moral codes. But Christian laws apply to Christians, not everyone else, Therefore, they should not be enforced by government, especially in a republic.

    0|0
    0|0
  • there is a place in new jersey that has the largest mall in several states so they, took a look through their laws and enforced a blue law forcing it to be closed on Sunday because for 7 days a week before people from several states would drive to their town and the highways would be full and the people wanted just one day away from this

    0|2
    0|0
    • I live in New Jersey and I didn't even know that. What mall was it?

    • Show All
    • @Lumberman53 Gloucester. It's pretty down here. Can't wait for fa color to start on Rt. 55.

    • Fall color

  • I imagine it's more for practical purposes and about the states views on alcohol consumption. Some states have 24/7 sales, others cut off at 11. Others cutoff at 2:30am. I know in Virginia if you're purchasing alcohol to walk out of a store with the cutoff is midnight, but if you're in a bar you can buy alcohol till 2am. You just can't take it outside.

    0|0
    0|0
  • Thats moronic. In a secular country its automatically a non-issue, religion does not interfere in politics and laws are not based on morals or religious decrees. With secularism also comes freedom of religion like you mentioned, so no instituition can hinder someone doing something on basis of religion. You can not interfere or infringe on someone esle's freedom because of your moral or religious basis. Why haven't these primitive laws been struck down yet. That's also a lot of revenue gone down the drain.

    First Amendment should apply everywhere:
    "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."

    0|0
    0|0
  • Another reason why Atheism should rule the world

    Religion is just a cult and a scam

    1|5
    1|2
  • I know for a fact that I was told Arkansas was dry on a Sunday, although this was some time ago. Has that law now changed there?

    0|0
    0|0
    • I believe sometime around 2009, Arkansas repealed it's Blue State Laws

    • Yep, that would make sense, it was before 2009.

  • Ohio and North Dakota belong on that list.

    Montana does not. You can buy alcohol in Montana on Sunday. I know this from experience.

    0|0
    0|0
  • Yeah, this came up a few years ago when I stopped by to buy some wine and beer for my uncle's BBQ in Connecticut. I went to the coolers and found them all locked. Being from out-of-state, I thought they had forgotten to unlock them in the morning and went to the clerk, only to be told there were no sales on Sunday. It seemed very strange.

    0|0
    0|0
    • Yup, that's a thing that happens. And people say, well, who would be drinking at 10am or something, but if you've got a party or something in the evening, people often buy food and drink at earlier times in the day because they'll be busy otherwise.

    • At that time is was all day Sunday. Since then they changed to law to allow sales on Sunday.

  • You should move to Sweden where people laugh at the religious.

    0|2
    0|0
  • You could write ten thousand books worth of complaining about this and nothing will ever change.

    Or you could move to another State, and then something would change.

    0|0
    0|0
  • Must be hard

    0|0
    0|0
  • The law is stupid. Live and let live.

    0|0
    0|0
  • sounds like italy.

    0|0
    0|0
  • Move

    0|0
    0|0
  • I had to google "tippling."

    0|0
    0|0
  • Can you partition in america to get it changed? Or further loosened?

    0|0
    0|0
  • More from Guys
    15

What Girls Said 11

  • I live in a town with similar rules, though they've recently been changing. The town was founded as a summer Methodist camp in the 1800's and eventually grew into a town.

    It's the community that makes the rules and votes on them. It's not so much about religion any more as about keeping it a family friendly place. The drinks and college kids won't invade us on nights and weekends if we don't sell alcohol (though drugs of course are everywhere, sadly).

    It keeps property values up and the community small and friendly. If you want to party, go to the next town. Oh, and we still have preachers come for summer camp meetings.

    1|0
    0|0
    • If you want your town to keep the drunks out, then I think it should just say that in the law... we don't want drunks on the weekends when the kids are out... but I think here for us, there really are super religious people who think this should be the cities moral obligation to keep people holy on Sunday, even though that "holiness" ends at noon.

    • Yeah I hear you

  • If you mean blue laws, they've been held constitutional because they're not explicitly religious.

    0|0
    0|0
  • This is why religion sucks.

    1|0
    0|0
  • I feel everyone should be able to practice what they want without shoving it down everyone's throats. This is the main reason why I do NOT like religion.

    0|0
    0|0
  • its must be difficult to live in such a place

    0|0
    0|0
  • Work to change it. Or move

    0|0
    0|0
  • Interesting, definitely not a problem were I live.. but we don't have casinos.

    0|0
    0|1
  • I genuinely don't care about the article, I just want points.

    0|0
    0|0
  • Interesting!

    0|0
    0|0
  • Very interesting

    0|0
    0|0
  • Dry counties end up having the best parties on Saturday night

    0|0
    0|0
Loading... ;