If it were possible to make thought crime a reality, should we?

Investigator
If it were possible to make thought crime a reality, should we?
Let's say we had some kind of futuristic ray gun that could scan the contents of people's brain. If we were to say, for example, find out that someone imagined themselves breaking into a bank or raping a woman, should we arrest them on the grounds that they were now predisposed to the idea and their arrest was to prevent it from happening?

Let's get darker and say someone imagined--again, not actually did anything, simply imagined--raping a child or going on a killing spree with an Uzi? Should we arrest them for the thoughts in their head, especially if our research on their mind leads us to believe they might have a proclivity to act on the machinations? Doesn't matter that they haven't done anything, all that matters is that they could do something because they thought about it.
If it were possible to make thought crime a reality, should we?
0
11
Add Opinion