Does having a regular boxing (fist boxing/pugilist/western boxing) background help if I start learning Muay Thai for the first couple of days?

There's this MMA I train at for Muay Thai, Kickboxing, Boxing and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Before I started going to this MMA gym, I had some amateur boxing background. I'm not very flexible from the waist below nor with my legs and I'm not much of a kicker so...

Does having a regular boxing(fist boxing/pugilist/western boxing) background help if I start learning Muay Thai for the first couple of days?


  • Yes
    0% (0)17% (1)14% (1)Vote
  • No
    0% (0)17% (1)14% (1)Vote
  • Depends
    0% (0)50% (3)43% (3)Vote
  • Others
    100% (1)16% (1)29% (2)Vote
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Most Helpful Guy

  • yes and no.

    yes, because it helps that you already know the basic punches; the combos; slip, parry and jab, etc. so you only have to focus on learning the kicks. you can also tell the instructor that you have boxing experience so you will find it easier to integrate with a new gym.

    no, because from a boxing perspective you start doing all of this intricate phonebooth style boxing when you get up close rather than using traditional muay thai clench techniques. obviously you won't be doing knees and elbows to the head, not for a long time but it's still good to be familiar with the clench.

    then there is range as well. if you are a tall boxer and used to using your reach for jabs, this is not as effective for muay thai because your opponent can still land low kicks, teeps, roundhouse to the body and even a front knee from a further distance than you can throw an extended jab (shoulder protruding forwards, in front of jaw). but then as a tall guy you will still have plenty of range for kicking.

    before you go there are two kicks you should focus on:
    - front kick : this is a teep on the front leg, just a front kick on the back leg
    - roundhouse: this is a switch kick with your front leg. you can also do roundhouse to the thigh (low kick), body (body kick) or head (head kick)

    If you can, try working these in with your punches, and learn how to use punches to disguise kicks.

    I think on the whole, boxing will help, so I voted yes.

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What Girls Said 1

  • no idea, just came to say ur cool asf and i aspire to be like u :D

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What Guys Said 3

  • It'll help it your going up against people who mostly rely on their elbows, fists etc, but not that much if your fighting people who utilize everything else like legs, knees, etc.

    Boxers don't have the best track record against martial artists, especially kickers, they aren't trained to combat it. The hardest part will be making your lower body more flexible and make it flow, I know that was the hardest part for me when I went from traditional Japanese martial arts to the more fluid and movement oriented martial arts because my body was rigid from being trained to be low and strong, to being more flexible, flowing and loose.

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  • Others

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  • Hard to say. It really depends on who you'd be sparring with. If you're an outside fighter and you're up against someone who likes leg kicks as most Thais are, it could be rough for you. Could be good for you if you are up against a guy that prefers hands and elbows.
    If you're an inside fighter, it'll nullify those long range kicks generally, but then you are in range for knees, elbows, and just getting dumped repeatedly.

    But it's not like you'll be a complete fish out of water. You could have crisper hands than some of the guys you are sparring with. It's not like you're coming from a grappling background. You're young so other things can be picked up fairly quickly anyway.

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