Grunge fans, why do you like Grunge?

It’s just unlistenable (to put it politely)

No melody. Have you ever noticed any Keyboard parts in any Grunge song?

Weak (and stolen) guitar riffs. Guitar riffs in Grudge are very simple. And most Grunge guitarists were mediocre and nobody remembers them.

Forgetable Basslines. Do you remember any basslines from any Grunge song? If you have ever tried to learn to play the Bass did your teacher ever suggested you any Grunge song?

Boring vocals. Grunge vocalists sound like, they don’t enjoy what they are doing.

It’s all about attitude. But even this attitude is absolutely pathetic, since even Grunge musicians themselves were branding themselves as losers.


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Most Helpful Guy

  • I honestly know as much as you do. There is nothing appealing to me about a bunch of guys with mediocre talent at best playing their instruments with the precision of a 4 year old while another guy wails about how much he hates his life for three and a half minutes.

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    • I always have to say this. Grudge destroyed Rock.

    • I believe if not for grunge, AOR and hair metal would have stayed popular in the 90s and who knows where music would be now. Sad that we'll never find out.

    • Actually there were good bands in the early 90s, like Damn Yankees and Giant. They followed the AOR/Hard Rock/Melodic Rock footsteps, but unfortunately the Grudge train smashed them.

What Girls Said 0

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What Guys Said 2

  • I can only speak from a singer's perspective, but there were some talented vocalists in that era. Chris Cornell (Soundgarden/Temple of the Dog) had 3.5 octaves from D2 to A5, and at his peak could hit strong G5s and G#5s fairly easily. His vibrato was strong, though he didn't use it much. His upper register is what he's best known for, but he hit some impressive lows as well.

    Layne Staley from Alice in Chains was better known for his mid-range singing, but had roughly the same amount of range as Cornell. On some earlier demo songs, he was effortlessly hitting a lot of Eb5s to F#5s. His vibrato was perfect, even on demanding parts (Bb4s on the final chorus of Man in the Box). Despite not going outside of his comfort zone very often, he could very smoothly pass between registers, like on the intro to I Can't Have You Blues.

    There are others of some note, like Skin Yard's singer, whose name I can't remember; who sang very similarly to Cornell, and Scott Weiland, who had far less comfortable range than some of the others mentioned, but still was a very solid singer nonetheless.

    I do agree that a lot of grunge, especially the most popular stuff like Nirvana and Pearl Jam, is largely talentless. It sounds more like you just don't enjoy the music, which is fine. But as I mentioned, grunge was not entirely void of talented musicians.

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    • Soundgarden, Alice in chains and STP were easily the best of the grunge era. Still listen to them to this day

  • What grunge have you been listening to?

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    • You know those mainstream shit like Nirvana, Soundgarden, Alice In Chains. Or even early era of Soul Asylum.

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    • Punk Rock like... Sex Pistols? I don't see any similarities.

    • Your disdain for grunge, is like mine for punk. Sex pistols, Danzig, Henry Rollins, etc. a lot of newer bands site influence from those bands, not from the grunge bands, at least not the good ones. Most of the crap rock, sum41, blink 182, and that nonsense was labeled something like new era punk. Where you have talented bands likes shinedown that were labeled new era grunge. I mostly listen to older thrash metal anyway

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