Anybody else think that America kind of overdid it with the whole "Love Your Body" campaign?

I understand that as a country, we had some major body image problems (likely on account of how fat our country has become). So, our nation began telling big girls they were beautiful and that they need not strive for the perfection they see on tv, which was a noble cause. However, rather than simply boost larger girls esteem, it seems to have created a rift between the two ends of the spectrums, with one being more socially acceptable to make fun of than the other. "Only dogs like bones".
Instead of empowering all women, it has simply placed them against each other.
Skinnier girls are now more self conscious than ever. Larger girls are so full of "big mama" pride and they've so thoroughly embraced their bodies that they no longer striving to lead healthier lives.

Bottom line. Did that positive body image campaign do more good or bad?

  • The campaign had an overall positive effect
    40% (4)67% (2)46% (6)Vote
  • The campaign had an overall negative effect
    60% (6)33% (1)54% (7)Vote
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Updates:
For the record, the whole healthy body campaign I'm referring to isn't in reference to any specific campaign, but rather a compilation of many small campaigns over several years.
The modeling industry is also slowly transitioning back to a healthier, albeit still skinny, size. I remember a year or so ago a Victoria's Secret model wasn't going to be allowed to walk or model or something until she put on some weight.

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Most Helpful Girl

  • It started out beautifully, but it got so twisted and over complicated that people started getting hurt. Bigger girls gained confidence and began throwing skinny girls under the bus with remarks like "only dogs go for bones" and others, skinny girls were so outnumbered by the new uprising of of big beauties that they couldn't really retaliate.

    So then we had some females calling their fat rolls "curves" and marching around thinking their unhealthy weight was something to be proud of. Not only that, but suddenly skinny girls are supposed to be unattractive and "unfemminine"? Bitch, please.

    If you're all skin and bones, you need to go have some cake because you're unhealthy. If you're a walking ball of lard, you need to lay off the cake because you're unhealthy.

    I know I'm speaking in extremes, but that's the way most of this has been portrayed in social media so that's how I'm going to lay it down here.

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What Girls Said 9

  • Anybody else think that America kind of overdid it with the whole "Love Your Body" campaign?
    No as I generally find gals be they thin or overweight tend to have low self-image and body issues.

    Did that positive body image campaign do more good or bad?
    A. The campaign had an overall positive effect
    In my opinion it did more 'good' as it seems more overweight gals have some self-esteem.

    "Instead of empowering all women, it has simply placed them against each other."
    Meh in my opinion the campaign didn't do this as gals were seemingly always placed against each other in accordance to conflicting male desires of beauty such as - curvy vs thin, blonde vs brunette, butts vs bust, etc.

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  • I'm conflicted. On one hand it's good that bigger girls are proud and happy with heir bodies.

    On the other hand, I agree with you, as a skinny girl I get constant comments about my weight. Comments that would be offensive and ride if it was said to a large girl, but because I'm thin, it's somehow ok to say those things to me. There's definitely a double standard there

    Instead of teaching large girls to love themselves, they should be teaching everyone to love their bodies regardless of what it looks like

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    • Addressing your last statement- That will never be possible. The larger girls will always be more of the outcasts compared to the overly skinny. Society has a role in what we deem beautiful, but largely so does evolution and man's natural attraction. Larger girls being the furthest from both measures of beauty. Therefore women as a whole will never be able to unify when it comes loving ALL of their bodies, no matter the shape or size.

  • Eh. I do think positive body image campaigns are good, especially considering how terrible our media is at diverse body representation. And I think many of those larger girls who embrace unhealthiness existed before, and that the positive body image campaigns didn't actually worsen it all that much. And anyhow, have you seen some of the "love your body campaigns? Look up Victoria's Secret's. Most of the girls in there are still far below the average weight, so I highly doubt that campaign actually encouraged obese girls to be more unhealthy and more hating toward skinny girls. So, I do think that campaign hurt more than it helped, but not because it encouraged unhealthiness. As for the others, I think it depends entirely on which campaign, and how it was presented. Perhaps a campaign about how healthiness isn't determined by size but rather by actual fitness would be better, and better get the message of self-confidence across without encouraging unhealthiness.

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  • I go towards both. I mean, bigger girls are SAYING they are proud of their curves, so they're using that as an excuse not to exercise. They're not exercising because they are actually self conscious. No matter how many times they tell you they are not self conscious, they really are. I used to be fat, and I told people I was accepting of my weight, but I really wasn't.

    And skinny girls are self conscious because they see all these goddamn super models who are FORCED to be anorexic in order to wear the doll sized clothes these people make. They are walking skeletons that the media is trying to play off as beauty. When in actuality, almost everywhere else in the world people find more full, healthy women beautiful.

    So, it's not just the "love your body" campaign that is the only cause of our fucked up weight problem. There's many other factors. :)

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  • I agree. The "only dogs love bones" offends me.

    I'm thin! Always have been. I'm a 0 and I eat terribly and can't gain weight even if I wanted. I don't run around calling bigger people fat so id appreciate if they didn't shame my body either.

    Also - love your body, yea. But 300lbs and obese isn't loving your body. If you love your body you take care of it. Being overweight causes a multitude of health issues and if you truly loved yourself you wouldn't do that.

    Diabetes, high blood pressure, etc are not beautiful. Same goes with thin girls and whatever issues they may have.

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  • It's America. Say one thing, do the other.
    Campaigns say "stop bully" "you're beautiful no matter your weight"

    Media, however, says "how to lose weight" "anti-aging creams" "plastic surgery" "look as so-so's body" "she gained weight" etc.
    Such a hypocrisy

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  • It does hurt when people refer to skinny people as 'sticks' or some other negative things but Everybody is made fun of, even gorgeous woman. i donno about the specific campaign but i dont like the idea of saying one bodytype is beautiful while the rest suck. how about: healthy body is good or just something else that isn't hurtful but rather encouraging

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  • This didn't affect how women react to each other, there has always been this divide, they just feel like they are able to voice how they feel more readily now.

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  • I agree, I'm tired of people thinking that I have an eating disorder when I'm at a healthy weight. I'm small and petite, and I'm so sick of hearing girls say "real women have curves", it's depressing!

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What Guys Said 2

  • This campaign only affected the stupid girls with stupid parents. No smart family would every allow such nonsensical bullshit to ever exist.

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  • I haven't heard of it, so my guess is no. America didn't overdo it at all.

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