Do you think that boys and girls should be raised in stereotypical fashion?

By stereotypical, I mean a boy is taught to be dominant, emotionally, reserved, rugged, and aggressive. Girls, taught to be submissive, emotionally responsive, passive, and caring. Masculinity vs. Feminist. Toy trucks vs. dolls.

Do you agree with raising children like this, or giving the child the independence to determine their own self?


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Most Helpful Girl

  • Oh goodness no. I'd have killed myself a long time ago if my parents insisted in raising me to be a stereotypical girl.

    My dad taught me to shoot, be out spoken, fight, and not let anyone boss me around.

    My mom taught me to stand my ground and not take crap from anyone.

    I would fail miserably in traditional gender roles. If my daughter wants to play with trucks and wear jeans then more power to her. If my son want to take ballet, then...well, I'd think that was lame, but he can do what he wants.

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    • Same here! I am a terrible cook, I hate dresses, I cannot sew, or do almost any of the stereotypical female jobs. I'd be a terrible girl if we were expected to be like on the show I love Lucy! xD

What Girls Said 17

  • I think the kid should work it out themselves but I believe they will be influenced mostly by siblings and parents behavior s. I was raised with 2 older brothers on a farm and my mother worked outdoors and never bothered with looks etc so I have very little patience for girlie things like doing makeup and hair and feel like its a drag to do. I don't get any pleasure from doing it except for a big occasion. I also am not afraid of spiders dirt, mess, travelling alone, being alone you know all the usual things girlie girls are afraid of. :P However I definitely do have a soft caring personality and the relationship I saw demonsrated at home still resonates with me i.e. the man is the powerful one who makes decisions and the woman should agree with him. I don't agree with this but this has been imprinted on me from such an early age its hard to shake off .

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  • No. I personally like tough guys but not to the point where they feel like they have to be so tough that they can't have fun. I know some guys who can't even laugh at a joke in front of people because they feel like it will ruin there masculinity.

    Girls, it's alright to be girlie girls, obviously, we are girls. But it's annoying when some girls can't even touch a basketball or even have a messed up ponytail cause they feel like they're acting like a boy. I think guys should have a certain amount of sensitivity just like girls should have a certain amount of toughness.

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  • No, they should just be loved and allowed to do all the fun things children should be. I plan on educating my children to the best of my abilities and I really want them to experience life/learn things (hobbies and what not). I'm not about to try and make them dominant and alter their emotions, etc. They should turn out just fine :)

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  • No, raising children in a stereotype of way is going to backfire at some point. You want both genders to turn out as strong, independent men and women.

    I wasn't raised that way, I was raised to be independent, dominant and tough. I was taught that I'm just as good as any man when it comes to tough jobs. Emotions weren't tolerated and the appropriate response to getting hurt was to cuss and keep going. But I was taught to care and look after others.

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  • I was raised to be a little bit of both and given a lot of independence. I hope to do the same for my kids if I choose to have any.

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  • No, people need to find out the type of person they are, not have some identity forced on them.

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  • I remember hearing that there are some emotional/psychological problems associated with gender stereotypes. Generally speaking I disagree with forcing children into gender stereotypes (I don't have kids though, so what do I know) however, I don't see anything wrong really with raising girls as emotionally responsive and caring. Those are natural characteristics in females, due to the fact that females are the ones who raise offspring (from an evolutionary/biological perspective)

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  • you can't be emotionally responses, or caring if you are passive. you likewise can not be aggressive if you are emotionally reserved.

    not only do stereotypes interfere with personality development, they interfere with their incoherent definitions.

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  • no. kids should be taught to be themselves and not to feel the need to conform the gender roles society has set. they are bullsh*t.

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  • No, let the children find themselves.

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  • No. It is quite bad since kids tend to respond negatively if you tell them to do something you can't back up with valid and reasonable arguments. Telling a little kid "because you're a boy/girl" is not something they will respond to, and it is certainly not something they can possibly grasp.

    Kids are not dogs. They need to be treated with reason.

    And since there is no reason behind pushing a child in doing something they don't like just because of their gender, the only thing you can get, is to have it backfire and raise an adult who is frustrated with stereotypes of their own gender, thus refuses them out of hate that accumulated over the years, while he/she would otherwise have liked those same things.

    I who was a wild tomboy during early childhood, running around with boys all up to my teens and even past, consider myself to be very feminine and have a rather submissive nature. While most of my female acquaintances who were stuffed in dresses from early childhood are loud and proud, bossy feminists.

    The other way around I know of, but it is rare.

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  • Yes

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  • YES! I wish it was like that so we didn't have manly women and sissy men. Please someone change it back...I want to be approached instead of being stared at from a distance, expected to walk up to some guy in order to be in a relationship. Being treated like a woman (NOT A FEMINIST), and have doors open for me, and bake cookies, and wear pretty dresses. Also the guys punch other guys in the face to show emotion, laugh at weaker men, and DON'T CRY in front of people! The princess boy thing would be burned! and ripped up and burned again! Bullied boys would fight instead of cry like little babies. ._______.

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    • ...and women wouldn't be allowed to work or play sports and would have to stay at home making the guy's meals. She'd only know three rooms: the kitchen, the bedrom, and the grocery store. All the household decisions would be left up to the guy and women would lose the right to vote. I'm with you on this one doll!

    • well I don't see any old women complaining about their 'hard lives' They seem happy.

  • I don't agree with teaching girls to be submissive.

    The problem with that is, she'll end up submissive, passive and yielding to the point where she is a foolish doormat, which sadly, many women and girls are. Its okay to be submissive if that's what makes you feel comfortable, but you have to be careful who you submit to or else people will take advantage of your weaker passive role. So no, I'm not setting my daughter up for failure like that. My daughter is going to be taught to be independent and emotionally reserved.

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  • If my son asks me to buy him a doll, I will, otherwise I'm going to assume he wants a truck... I'd love hiim either way!

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  • No. That's do wrong

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  • I don't want children, but if I did I would encourage the girl to be feminine and the boy to be masculine. I would not force them to fit into these roles by any means, but it just seems easier to choose from activities to suggest.

    Besides not wanting children I am pretty feminine and I love it.

    :)

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What Guys Said 4

  • Not everything you cite here is a stereotypical image. For example, boys play with trucks because the male brain is MOSTLY (double underilne this) oriented towards practical thought while girls are usually better at social engineering tasks (dressing the doll to impress, arranging 'doll meetings' etc). The preference is formed later, and here's the proof: give a one year old girl a toy truck and I assure you the little baby is going to play with it and have fun; same goes for a one year old boy with a doll.

    But to answer directly, no, stereotypes have no place in raising a child. I hate it when fathers instruct their sons that they should have sex with anything female that moves or mothers dressing their daughters to be suitable for the above task. That doesn't mean that roles won't exist, it's nature talking. If a male has a lot of hormones brewing, despite being advised or not, he will try to get sex. As you said, every person should grow up in an environment that leaves choices open. There's nothing wrong with a girl who plays with trucks, and the goes on to become an acknowledged engineer.

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  • Nah. Let people be themselves.There's nothing worse than trying to be something your not to gain the acceptance of others.

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  • Yes. Because not doing so would make your child not fit in with society.

    Being different than others isn't always a good thing.

    Take it from someone who learned that the hard way.

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  • Yes, except you meant Masculine vs Feminine.

    For men, add dutiful and patient. Authoritative in lieu of dominant. Resolute in lieu of aggressive.

    For women, add nurturing (state of action) in lieu of caring (state of mind). Deferential (respect) versus passive (weakness).

    I believe you endevour to to keep the child on the masculine/feminine script but make room for a Baryshnikov or Margaret Thatcher.

    Letting a child find him/herself without strong mentoring is a prescription for failure. Parents do not provide only sperm and egg, XNichokex3.

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