What do you think about marriage between two non-religious people?

Should we form a new type of bonding between those in love that is non-discriminant and isn't sacred?

I think they should create such so that non-religious people can come together as such.

Do you think it's weird that atheists undergo a typically religious based binding like getting married?


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Most Helpful Guy

  • Marriage is not a religious institution. I really wish religion and government would both stop trying to regulate it for society as a whole. Whether each entity recognizes a marriage as valid is up to them, but I don't think a church should be responsible for overseeing the marriage of atheists. On that same token, I'd really rather not see anyone tell a church what marriages it will or won't condone.

    No, I don't think it's weird for atheists to seek a marriage even if they do think it's a religious institution. It's a societal expectation to get married, and very traditional.

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What Guys Said 4

  • Well the ceremony to unite two people in marriage has been going on all over the world with many different religious beliefs and even none at all associated with it. I don't see anything wrong with non-religious people doing the same thing. It's true that legal marriage prevents gays and lesbians from marriage in many states and around the world and yes that usually has religion under tones but that whole thing is hypocritical anyway. Two atheists could get married but two guys or two girls are rejected when they are all going to be roasting in hell just the same lol.

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  • Marriage isn't a "religious based binding." A marriage is recognized by the state, and it wasn't until about the 11th century that marriages began to be held by the church. Marriage historically, has always been a state/government form of societal organization, back even to the days of Babylon and ancient Mesopotamia.

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  • Why would marriage between two non-religious people not be sacred? Not many people I know that are married are relgious and did not want a lot of religion to be in their ceremony.

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  • What's weird about it?

    Only the religous types still have that quaint notion that marriage is religious.

    You can get married by an Elvis impersonator in Vegas, and divorced in under 55 hours. (Thank you Ms Spears).

    The idea that it's still a sacred and religious institution, is laughable.

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    • Well, when we still have people denying the rights of whatever bond to gays and lesbians, it's questionable that they still deny others for religious reasons.

    • Oh, it's the usual, bigotry and religious reasons.

      I just don't think we need anything new for the atheists. Marriage is not a religious thing.

What Girls Said 3

  • I don't think it is necessary to have a new type of "marriage". The one we already have can be made unreligious by changing the words and by simply signing papers.

    Most people who are not religious still get married. Not because of religious reasons but because they want to have the same legal rights. Also it makes a big difference to be able to introduce someone as your husband. It makes your relationship seem more serious and "responsible" than introducing someone as your boyfriend.

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  • there is no different. love is love. marriage is something that should last forever and be a bond for a man and woman.

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  • The first recorded evidence of marriage is from 2350 B.C. in Mesopotamia. In case you're not sure, that predates the Old Testament of the Bible. In other words, marriage is older than the Bible, so if you're going to argue that marriage falls under any of the Abrahamic religions, sorry, but no.

    Originally, marriage had little to do with either love or religion.

    Christianity didn't really begin to play a role in marriage until the 1500s (A.D.) when the Roman Catholic Church became very powerful in Europe and it was required that a priest blessed a marriage in order for it to be legally recognized (written into canon law by the Council of Trent in 1563).

    Of course, different forms of marriage exist in different cultures, with their own traditions, etc. associated with it.

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    • I had no idea. Thanks for the history lesson! :D

    • No problem! :D

    • Damn it I should have read this before posting.

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