How to convince my parents to let me ride a motorcycle and what should I do for the MSF course?

Many of you have seen my question about the Camaro and CL. That's good and all but now that life situation has changed and riding will be the most economic and fun thing I can do. You see, there's a good chance I will be getting an off-campus apartment at my university next year. It won't be far, maybe 3-5 miles on some highway/city streets. I have a car already, but commuting to school and parking in those lots is a NIGHTMARE. If I had lived on campus I wouldn't need to commute but on-campus housing a rip off. Anyways, I'll keep my car and really only use a bike to commute to and from school. There's dedicated motorcycle parking in the lots and bike racks anywhere. I'll have to check the school rules but I think parking a motorcycle at a bike rack is okay since I see people with scooters do it all the time. Since I'm only using the bike on a short commute, good fuel economy and a cheap bike are important. I'll obviously make sure I spend a good amount on protective gear. I'm not into cruisers but sport bikes instead, however a Supermoto or Dual-sport will be good too. I'm actually thinking of a Dual-sport since my co-workers that ride say they're super easy to learn riding on and utilitarian since they can go anywhere. Anyways, I'm about 6'3" and 220lbs so I've been told a 250cc isn't the best and many have recommended a Suzuki SV650-S because of my size. If I do go with a 250, I like Hondas so whatever you recommend from them would be great.
Back on track... How do I convince my parents to let me ride? I've asked them what they think about bikes before and the answer was "NO.", however, considering I'm riding in a chillax evironment I think I should be able to convince them. Either way, bikes are cheap so I can buy one under their noses. Also, about the MSF course, I haven't found good info on it. I plan on doing it late July or in August, but what do I need to do other than sign up and pay? Do I need a helmet? What about the online thing? Thanks!

Updates:
"Why do you need your parents permission, you're 19 BROOOO!!!"
They're still helping me pay for school so while I have the "get good grades" part down I don't have the "do what we say" part down. They could cancel the loans, but I don't think they would do that.

Also, I'm not stupid. I will get a full face, expensive helmet. Along with full leathers and armored jacket/pants. Plus riding boots and gauntlets.

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Most Helpful Guy

  • this is the way I convinced my parents.. at first they obviously say no to bikes and they told me I can buy one after they are dead. so what I did was up the stakes really high and told them "okay im gonna buy a Nissan GT-R", I showed serious interest and eventually it made it look like purchasing a bike wasn't even half bad since they went through so much with me on going about purchasing and insurance, interest rates, etc. basically I just wore them out. it was all downhill from there, I said "you know what I'll just take the MSF course only just to see how it is", they didn't argue. then after I took it and passed I started shopping for bikes and at that point they seriously just were like "blech... okay fine".

    not sure if this tactic will work on your parents, it takes time to wear them down, but I also did have the funds to purchase a GT-R and a motorcycle so it was looking legit serious to them, which probably contributed a lot to them changing their mind, being that eventually they realized a $120,000 car is not worth it compared to a $5300 motorcycle.

    after all that I bought my gear first and then took the MSF, buying the gear first and already owning it before the bike was all the more reason to get a bike, otherwise that is more money down the drain and useless riding gear. then I went out and bought a Ninja 300, boom, I played the trust card extremely well and was super safe with my riding and proved it to them over time that I am a damn responsible rider. my parents don't care if I ride or not anymore, they trust me.

    im kinda doubting this method will work in your case but buying a motorcycle is something that your parents will either be okay with or you just have to kinda go and do it, regardless of what they say. but don't be reckless about it, take baby steps so that your parents can warm up to the idea little by little and prove to them you are mature and responsible and won't get yourself hurt. show your interest in motorcycles and always be positive. don't try to fight them, just find a positive counter to an argument if need be.

    www.girlsaskguys.com/.../a8399-so-you-want-to-ride-a-motorcycle

    www.girlsaskguys.com/.../a8416-shopping-for-gear-motorcycle-gear-geeks

    lastly, I think it would be fine for you to start on a 650 or something alike. 250 is good as well, cheaper option too. if you want a small Honda then it would be a CBR250R, craigslist should have a bunch of them.

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    • I don't know if you can park your bike on a bicycle rack, im sure some scooters do it but a motorcycle? probably not if there is already motorcycle designated parking areas.

      if you go with Honda, a CBR500R should be suffice, for Kawasaki a Ninja 650, Suzuki, SV650, and.. Yamaha doesn't really have a middle class.. I mean they have a FZR600 but that bike is actually fast, a well tuned inline-4, not R6 status but still damn good.

      your first bike won't be your last so don't get too caught up with purchasing your first bike, make sure you at least get good gloves, boots, helmet, and a nice leather jacket. I would even recommend a nice pair of pants, either Kevlar jeans or armored textile.

    • as for the MSF, you simply sign up and pay. it should take an entire 2 days, likely a Saturday and Sunday. I would highly recommend you bring your own gear because their gear sucks, its all sweaty and shit from other people using it, it gets pretty disgusting. all that is required are gloves, long sleeves that cover your arms, boots that cover your ankles, pants that cover your legs, and a helmet. you don't need to bring a jacket, you can do this all in a long sleeve shirt and jeans.

What Girls Said 2

  • Tl;dr.

    You're 19, technically you can do what you want.

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    • Technically they're helping pay for school, so some restrictions apply.

  • WEAR A HELMET and be safe!

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    • I'm not stupid, a helmet is only one of the several pieces of protective equipment I will buy.

What Guys Said 8

  • Can't help with the parents situation because I didn't start riding until I was in my late 20s. But for the other stuff here:

    1. The requirements to take the MSF course vary from state to state. In my state it's free to take but you already have to have your learners permit. In others there's a few to take it and no permit required. The class usually runs 4 days (2 weekday evenings where they cover classroom time, and 2 weekend days of riding instruction in a parking lot).

    2. For your first bike a 250 makes plenty of power even for a bigger guy. The issues where 250s typically fall short is that they have cheap suspension components that aren't adjustable and are only rated for like a 150 pound person. This won't be an issue in the very beginning but as you get comfortable enough on the bike to start taking corners harder it'll limit you because the bike won't be planted when cornering. Unfortunately most any bike that's suitable for beginners is going to suffer from the same issues. There are a few notable exceptions like the Kawasaki Ninja 650R, Yamaha FZ07, and I think the Suzuki DR-Z400.

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  • Hahaha dude, you will never convince your parents that getting a bike is ok, it's just never ever going to fly with them and you have to accept that. Just ignore them and do what's best for you. I have been telling my parents that I'm getting a bike since I was like 12 and they're still heavily against it. I could never afford one bc of my speeding tickets and insurance so I haven't bought one, but I will in 2 years but it has nothing to do with them anymore since I'm an independent adult.

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  • Well this is hard. I mean when I was shopping for a motorcycle my dad (listen, not my mom!!) accepted that I would be able to ride if i followed these rules: 1. Be home at 11PM straight, or if not possible, call them an hour before and give them a [legit] reason why you will not be home. 2. Since my mom does not have a car (she lives in Lithuania), I have to take her anywhere she need to be taken. 3. I would wear a DOT helmet, motorcycle boots (not sneakers), riding chaps and a riding jacket. These rules are printed out and hanged on my bedroom wall reminding me, that if I break a rule I would then be given a time-set takeaway of my motorcycle, usually it's a week. If you can give these reasons to your parents, my opinion is that the chance they will let you get a motorcycle would increase.

    For the motorcycle part: I'm personally a fan of Standard or Sport, Dual-Sport or Enduro. Choppers, superbikes/crotchrockets are not my type.

    Rewind 4 months ago: My 3 favourite choices are: 1. Ducati Monster 821/Hypermotard 2. BMW F800gs/adventure, 3. BMW R1200gs/adventure.
    I chose Hypermotard and I paid $14k for it

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    • Well a motorad isn't exaclty a beginner bike, I'm talking about a cheap, easy to ride one, preferably one that's $2k or less. Thanks for the help though! My reasoning will be that it's only for commuting a short, slow, and safe distance to campus and that a motorcycle is safer than a scooter since more gear is worn and it's more agile. I think I can convince them then, or at least my dad. I work at a biker bar and while 95% of the riders that work there or visit are Harley guys, I'd be accepted by many others.

  • Sit them down and calmly explain why you want a motorcycle. Tell them your doing a MSF, and that you will appreciate their support. Tell them they don't have to pay a thing for the bike.
    That is what I did when I bought my bike.
    they may not like it but they will come around eventually.
    Suzuki and Honda good models.
    MSF depends on the state you live in. Different states have different regulations.
    When you sign up call them and ask if you need anything besides a helmet. Good boots are a must. I only needed a helmet and proper shoes for mine. Everything else was optional.
    Good luck

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  • You are 19. You are an adult. You can anything you want.

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    • Not true, They're still helping me with school.

    • Ok, then act like an adult. Go to school, graduate, get a job, save money and then buy your ride.

  • Why do you need your parents permission for something when you are an adult? What country do you live i heard Americans are still kinda treated like teenagers until over 21, is that true?

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    • Depends, they still have a lot of power over you if they're helping with school like in my case.

    • @asker that's so strange I would hate that.
      My mums helping me with mine and I'm 24 lol. She hasn't told me what to do since I was 16
      o. O

  • since u r 19 do u still need yer parents approval?

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  • You need helmet!

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    • I'm not stupid, a helmet is only one of the several pieces of protective equipment I will buy.

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