Which falls faster?

If you drop two balls from somewhere really high, the same shape and size but one is heavier (lets say metal) and the other is lighter (lets say plastic). Which falls the fastest? And why?

Don't google it! I just want to see how many people know it :)

  • Metal falls faster!
    50% (5)33% (3)42% (8)Vote
  • Plastic falls faster!
    10% (1)0% (0)5% (1)Vote
  • They fall the same speed!
    40% (4)67% (6)53% (10)Vote
  • My brain hurts >.<
    0% (0)0% (0)0% (0)Vote
And you are? I'm a GirlI'm a Guy
Updates:
Okay, so the answer is actually the metal one, but only by a tiny bit because of buoyancy. In a vacuum they would fall at the same speed. Many people think the metal will fall faster simply cause it has a bigger force pulling it down. Then there are many people who remember learning that they actually fall the same speed, because g=W/m=9.8m/s^2, the force is stronger but it needs more force to accelerate. But very few people seem to know that that's only in a vacuum and in air the heavy one does
fall faster. And out of those few people most think it's cause of air resistance, which doesn't matter because they're the same shape and size. So the real reason is buoyancy, it's what makes things float. And an easy way to see this is dropping a balloon full of air and a balloon full of water. Or a balloon full of helium works even better.
So thanks all for your responses :) Hope you learned something interesting :)

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Most Helpful Guy

  • metal falls faster ' in air '

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    • Why?

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    • Lol that doesn't explain it. I've already posted the answer now anyway, I just wanted to see if he knew why things that weigh more fall faster in air

    • Omar, The asker has already provided a beautiful explanation for the question, but if its tldr; for you, simply , we know that v=u+at , in case of gravity, v=u+gt
      this expression is independent of m, (mass) that means velocity in free fall is independent of mass. This is true for ball and earth as system ( that means no air) , but when air is considered an upward buoyant force is excerted which is inversely propotional to mass. Hope you understand it and sorry if this sounded too nerdy.

What Girls Said 4

  • The heavier one..
    Because it has more gravity pushing it down? I think.

    And the lighter one will take time and float in the air a bit due to lower density?

    I don't know. I quit physics.

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    • But heavier objects need a stronger force to accelerate

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    • It's the same when falling down, and the force stays the same, just it's heavier so it needs more force to move it. See update, I posted the answer :)

  • Heavier one

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    • Why?

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    • Are you sure they said that at school?

    • Usually at school they teach that they fall the same speed, but that's in a hypothetical world without air. Heavy objects do actually fall slightly faster but if they told you that your teacher was better than most ^^. See update for the full answer

  • Over what distance? I believe the metal would reach terminal velocity quicker than something lighter.

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    • The distance doesn't matter for which will reach the ground first, the metal one always will. But the lighter one will reach terminal velocity first

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    • You're more into the theoretical stuff?

    • No, if physics is described to me practically, like demonstrated, then I'm sure it would sink in much quicker. I learn best through doing and seeing, not theory.

  • i voted metal

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What Guys Said 5

  • I would think heavier one will fall faster

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  • All In remember from physics is that weight / mass has no bearing on the acceleration when they fall.

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    • Yeah but that's only actually true in a vacuum

    • God damn physics and its pre-conditions. Hahaha.

  • The fall at the small speed 9.8 m/s/s

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    • I meant same, not small

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    • They still fall at the same speed

    • Yes they would in a vacuum. I never said anything about a vacuum so the answer is the metal one. See update

  • A feather falls at the same speed as a hammer on the moon.

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    • Yeah, almost the same. The moon does actually have an exosphere, which is like a very thin atmosphere, so it the hammer would fall a tiny bit faster, but not enough to notice

  • Some of you need to watch that, the misconceptions about falling objects http://youtu.be/_mCC-68LyZM

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    • This video is actually what gave me the idea to ask this. Because the biggest misconseption is that they fall the same speed, when that only actually happens in a vacuum. Heavy objects fall faster in air, though here they are both heavy and the distance is so short so it's not noticable. See update :)

    • Hehe... both balls...😂😋😊😛

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