What does morals/dignity mean to you? How important is it?

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Do you have any? :p


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Most Helpful Guy

  • I have many many morals. They mean a lot to me.

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What Guys Said 3

  • I consider myself a very immoral - or to put it in a positive way - moral-free person. I don't believe in morals because they are man-made rules that function on a right-and-wrong schema, which I consider both oversimplified/undifferentiated and fallible. What I care about are ethics. I believe there are universal ethical rules that apply to all individuals and all societies that don't exist because somebody prescribed them (god, the bible, somebody's dad, your teacher etc.) but because they ensure a peaceful and prosperous existence for humanity as a whole and for me as a part of it to live on this planet. For example: a lot of people say "murder is wrong". This is something I would say because it very much sounds like a prescription ("Thou shalt not kill"). Morals prescribe do's and don'ts but ethics don't. However, this doesn't mean that ethics don't care about how we should live together as humans. They're just not as preachy. A person such as me who believes in ethics would for example say "I believe murder is an unjust action because it ignores an individual's right to live and it is a danger for us as a society or as a species because in my opinion we should base our values not on religious or political dogmas but on mutual understanding and empathy, cooperation and solidarity.
    The advantage of ethics (apart from not being preachy) is that they're more than personal convictions. For example somebody can say that "it is wrong to be gay". On a moral basis, this can work. If I am a fundamentalist christian or muslim or jew, I will believe this. It's part of my morals. However, ethically speaking, homosexuality is both unproblematic for a society as well as for the individual (which is why I am a very gay-friendly person).
    Now, you might say to me that if I believe in a fixed set of ethical rules, this leads us to the idea of religion again. Who established these rules? Was it a god? Or if it was humans (declaration of human rights), aren't they arguable too? It is true that some philosophers have argued that way in the past and some of them were in fact religious. To that I would answer that a god is not necessary for us to understand what we should do or what we shouldn't do. I'm sure you wouldn't kill anybody even if you hadn't read the bible. The ethical set of rules might indeed be arguable but empathy and cooperation have always worked the best for us humans so far. Or to put it with Kant's categorical imperative: "Act only to that maxim, whereby

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    • you can, at the same time, will that it should become a universal law." So for example if you don't want murder to become a universal law, if you don't want people to go around killing each other (to put it sloppily), you shouldn't commit a murder. I believe this way of looking at human conduct is much more complex and helpful than simply claiming "Murder is wrong".

  • I have my own morals and they don't always go with societies morals.

    I believe everyone has their own morals and that's important.

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  • I have personal morals and believe in human dignity.

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What Girls Said 3

  • I have my few set of moral values.
    But mostly I strive to b compassionate, open minded and respectful of others, sometimes despite my own moral code.

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  • I don't know.. I mean I don't like to owe anyone anything.. I don't bribe or blackmail people..
    I don't start fights, I just.. Exist I guess :D

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  • i stand by the morals taught to me by my parents

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