Why is it that 99.9% of America's dark history excluded from school history books and classrooms?

Like how Washington lied to slaves about setting them free if they helped the colonists win the war against the Brits?
This is a very little well known one right here: Slave owners gave slaves cocaine and heroin because they believed it made slaves work harder and faster, or that drugs were first only made illegal for blacks and other minorities to use , sell possess while it was okay for whites to use , sell , possess? I found this out by just watching the history channel and researching online. I know for a fact that I would've never learned this in a classroom. I wonder why this was hidden? I know they would NEVER , EVER EVER talk about this in drug awareness classes. If anyone else has any other dark history that's not known please share thanks.


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Most Helpful Girl

  • Throughout history in general, every countries goal is to elevate themselves and instill pride in its youth about their country. When you feel pride in something, when things are as American as apple pie, you are willing to fight and die for that ideal and to protect it at all costs. The authors of these books spend 80% of the time talking about how we freed the slaves and everything was great for everyone and everyone was equal, how we United peacefully with the Native American's for the first Thanksgiving, how we sheltered Asian American's during the war, and on and on until what is often myth, becomes legend, and legend becomes history. Ever tried to tell the real story of Thanksgiving to a bunch of kids drawing hand turkey's... they'd never believe it. We do however now live in an age where our history is a bit less controlled by those that wield the pen. The average citizen is controlling what's recorded, what's filmed, finding the truth out and spreading it via the internet but that is only for those who want to know it. Most if not all American's will ever only simply believe what they read in school because its just easier that way, and that's exactly how historians and puritanical American's want you to believe.

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Most Helpful Guy

  • Well, I study history (general history or I think in America you guys call it world history) myself at University and I see it like this: "History" is something very different from "historiography". History is what actually happened. It is almost like a parallel universe that will never be able to reach. Because all we have now are sources we can analyse and interpret. Sometimes, we don't even have the first-hand sources anymore and interpret other people's interpretations. As a historian, it is my job to come as close to what really happened as possible. However, I am also aware of the fact that I will never actually be able to reach this point. In fact, even if I sat into a time machine and I travelled back to, say, the early 19th century when slavery was still present in the US, I wouldn't be able to actually record history. I could be an eye-witness and this would be of unimaginable value to modern historians, but I wouldn't actually be able to claim that the things I observed exactly happened the way I observed it or - even more importantly - for the reasons I believe. This is because even as a first-hand eye witness, we always see reality through a certain pair of glasses so to speak. This is why it's important in the academic research of history to have as many sources as possible. There is no right or wrong. Everyone sees things differently and these different view points have a lot to do with social factors (age, sex, gender, social class, upbringing, nationality, ethnicity, time of living, political views, religious views, personal health, character etc. etc.). This now brings me to historiography. Historiography is the depiction of history. It is what we often wrongly call "history". If I say "Hitler was a brutal dictator", then that is an example of historiography. It is the view of Hitler that we now have at this particular moment in time in the western hemisphere (not all of us, but most at least). If however, that is a fact in the sense of hard facts as in the natural sciences will never be known. It is possible and imaginable that people of a different historical period will view Hitler and his time drastically different. Historiography (the image we have of history) is always infused with all kinds of things such as culture, mentality, how a society functions and so forth. And of course also political agenda. What is taught in schools is not actually history but it is the view on history that a number of involved people have: the teacher,

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    • the people who wrote the general curriculum for this subject on a community or state level, the politicians who perhaps employ these people or influence the curriculum with their agenda and, finally, the whole society (and al of its facets) in which all of these people live.

What Girls Said 4

  • Because the winner gets to write the story. I hear that in many Asian countries they don't mention the holocaust much when referring to World War Two

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  • I thought everybody knew this.

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    • They never mentioned none of this in my history classes in school. Ever.

    • When you're black you tend to hear it more from your relatives and other sources to see if it's true, then fucking U. S. history classes. xD

  • Yeah there's a lot they won't include. Bs.

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  • other countries don't do that.

    i mean why would anyone want to hide something?

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What Guys Said 9

  • They want kids to grow up thinking America is on top and that we learned our lessons and became a better country for it.

    I never learned any of this shit and I JUST graduated like a month ago, so I can safely say they still aren't teaching this.

    But its more of a sense that they want you to only know SOME bad, and not all of it. Very prideful sense about the country and don't wanna actually teach kids the full truth. Should though. If my kid is learning American history than they better be teaching ALL of it, not picking and choosing.

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  • As stated by BlueCoyote the curriculum teaches what the government wants you to know. As for the slaves, those who fought in the war for either side were promised freedom. Something that is often overlooked in history classes in both Canada and the US is what happened to the First Nations people. In Canada they were forced into reeducation centres known as Residential Schools. There they were taught to act White and to hate their heritage. That was only mentioned once in my history class, and all other First Nations problems which continue to this day were swept under the rug.

    The victors get to write the history books. Just look at Japan, they still haven't acknowledged the rape of Nanjing.

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    • Holy fuck. Rape of Nanjing... I haven't read something that dark in awhile. I had to stop at the with infants being cut open to be raped. How the hell don't you knownlegde that? Its beyond disgusting. -_- ugh wow.

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    • Maybe that explains why America wants everyone to forget, especially the group/s that suffered the most.

    • @Asker If you think about it slavery was unconstitutional from day 1 but it was Lincoln that freed the slaves and not Washington or Jefferson.

  • aamy811 was spot on - The winner writes the history books.

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    • Winner of what exactly? And why would the winner exclude or hide those things?

    • The predominant culture - In states at the moment it would be the whites - Look at the way native American indian history is taught in schools

  • History is written by the victor my friend but we should delve deep into our history, our pasts, for those that forget history (all of it) are doomed to repeat it.

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  • What classes are you in? If anything, for the last 40 odd years we have had an overwhelmingly *negative* view of American history, the the point of "historians" rooting for the Soviet side in the Cold War. Howard Zinn's drivel comes to mind.

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    • They NEVER mentioned this in my history classes in grade school or high school.

    • While I don't know Howard Zinn and what he says in detail, I would like to remind you that being critical of one's own history doesn't equate with rooting for another country (or hating your own country). I doubt Howard Zinn was actually rooting for the Soviet Union and studying history myself, I believe that it is not a historian's job in general to root for anyone (regardless of the topic). Of course everyone has their convictions and sometimes they come through in your work and that's totally okay but a historian's job is always to study and present all the facts and connections and provide a full picture of a particular topic or historical situation. As a historian, I am sure Howard Zinn knew this.

    • Read him--he was. I can deal with honest criticism, but when it is dishonest it is nauseating.

  • Basically what aamy811 said. However, I wouldn't single out the US of A for it's hidden dark past. Japan did the same exact thing with the Rape of Nanking against the Chinese. The only difference is that Japan blatantly denies the Nanking tragedy or refuses to acknowledge what they did were wrong while the White/Caucasian Americans in the US does somewhat acknowledge their dark past with the Native Americans but at the same time, they justify it with a "there was no laws before the US was taken by Europeans" argument.

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    • Sure but I can only be concerned about the history of the country I belong to which is the USA.

  • Some of that is half truth and out of context but the reason why that is considered minutiae is the same reason George Washington's favorite desert (chilled pawpaw) or LBJ's pet name for his dick (jumbo) are not taught. There is just too much history to teach anything but the most direct line explaining how we got here and why things are as they are to fill student's heads with trivia and that stuff is off the main track. It may seem impressive to you personally but the history of man's inhumanity to man is a dreary repetitive and unenlightening affair. People do horrible shit to each other and it's horrible but just being horrible doesn't make it important.

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  • Cause America. ... Seriously, we're trying to brainwashed into thinking America was and still is good. Do you REALLY think they're gonna try to bring up even more bad blood?

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  • I thought Sasquatch uses cocaine and heroin. Why don't they talk about THAT?

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    • That's if you believe in sasquatch.

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