Anyone graduated in the English language here please?

I want to know if the following sentence is gramatically correct. I found it in a European history book.

"The treaties which brought to an end to the Revolution and Napoleonic Wars, and the stuggle between Britain and the United States transformed European geopolitics."

I think it is wrong in the first part. It should either read, "... to an end the Revolution...", or "... an end to the Revolution...".
So according to me there is an extra "to" in the sentence.

Right or wrong?


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Most Helpful Guy

  • The treaties that brought an end to the Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars, and the struggle between Britain and the United States, transformed European geopolitics.

    1) Changed WHICH to THAT.

    That vs which. The test is whether the clause is necessary for the sentence to make sense. If it's necessary, then it's a restrictive clause, so use that. If it's not necessary, then it's non-restrictive, so use which.

    In this case, it's referring to specific treaties. The sentence wouldn't make sense without the restrictive clause. So 'that' should be used.

    2) Deleted the first "to".

    It could be:
    brought to an end the Revolution
    or
    brought an end to the Revolution

    The first one is somewhat archaic and poetic. The second one is preferred. Using both is just plain wrong.

    3) I added a couple of commas. Some would argue that the comma after "Wars" is not needed. However, when the last item in a list is a long clause then the comma is recommended. I admit I'm somewhat old school with the commas. The use of commas has decreased over the years and I tend to use more than most people.

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    • You seem to be very educated in English! That was a very good answer. Can I ask you what is your qualification?

    • I'm not an expert. I don't have any special qualifications other than speaking English for a long time. This just happened to be an easy question.

      I never can remember which vs that. I had to look it up to be sure. I just thought of a way to remember it. Think of "sandwich". A sandwich is two pieces of bread with something in the middle. When you use "which", it is like extra information, like something you could put inside parentheses. Think of parentheses like two pieces of bread with the clause in the middle. For example:

      I went to the store (which is three blocks from my home).

      The clause "sandwiched" in the parentheses is unnecessary additional information.

    • Unqualified people would not go into that much detail unless they take the trouble to refer to grammar books and stuff. It really sounded like you knew the grammar very well, typical of someone who studied the language at university level in my opinion.

What Girls Said 2

What Guys Said 1

  • "The treaties which brought to an end to the Revolution and Napoleonic Wars, and the stuggle between Britain and the United States transformed European geopolitics."

    It should be "the treaties which brought 'an' end to the Revolution and Napoleonic Wars." Also "struggle" is misspelt.

    Unless this was you and not the book. If this WAS you, then I think the book was fine.

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    • Struggle was typed incorrectly on my part, but the other point was what I noticed as wrong in the book.

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