Do you think "In God we trust" should be removed from US money?

I do, because the US is not a single-religion state. Putting that on dollar bills basically says "every American has freedom of religion, but you still gotta believe in a god" to me.

  • Yes
    48% (14)58% (21)54% (35)Vote
  • No
    38% (11)36% (13)37% (24)Vote
  • Unsure / See results
    14% (4)6% (2)9% (6)Vote
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Updates:
I know it would be a waste of time to do that, but let's just hypothetically say that it would be possible in the blink of an eye to get rid of it.
To @Paris13: Respect for "the Lord" is praying to him or worshipping him or whatever Christians do, not forcing God down the throats of nonbelievers by putting it on money. You ask me to argue in private messages, but I can't even message you because you've blocked people you don't follow from doing that, so what exactly are you trying to reach here?
This is for @Paris13 again: if anything here is low class, it is that you obstruct any possible way for me to keep discussing this. Compared to "arguing in public" that is a lot more low class. Also, you commented on one thing @jaquesvol said, but then subtly ignored his point about that Obama being a Muslim is a conspiracy theory (spoiler: it is).

If you actually have some "class" and are "one of the best" and "wise", don't block people when you run out of arguments. Don't be pathetic. Bye.

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Most Helpful Girl

  • Yes, it's inappropriate and unconstitutional and shouldn't be there. The modern usage is another example of theistic propaganda from the McCarthyist era, and shouldn't have been allowed in the first place.

    It doesn't personally bother me that much that it is there, aside from the constitutional issue and the fact it marginalizes nonbelievers. The similar addition to the Pledge of Allegiance is more egregious, in my opinion.

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Most Helpful Guy

  • Honestly I don't even notice it but I can understand the arguments against it. It wasn't added to our coins until 1864 and our paper money until 1957. This is in a country that's supposed to be neutral towards religion yet we see a growing encroachment of Christian symbolism in US government. Congress isn't supposed to pass laws respecting an establishment of religion. I say we return to our original currency and be proud of e plurabus unem which is Latin for "out of many, one". Thats way more unifying than pushing a god a decreasing number of people in the us believe in.

    You can bet your ass that if atheists put "there are no gods" on the currency Christian groups would be flipping the fuck out. I think it's hypocritical.

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What Girls Said 5

  • I just saw this Now, @93stepsawayfromhome and if it wasn't for "In GOD we trust," No one but no one would even have a buck in his or her back pocket.
    There is just too much of Getting rid of God, Jesus, altogether nowadays, and with a Muslim in office, this is where it started. None of our American Presidents were ever like this, in fact Regan, God bless his deceased soul, was a Born Again Christan.
    Good luck. xx

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    • I understand that you are a Christian, you're free in that. However, you're ignoring the point of the question here.

      1) "No one but no one would even have a buck in his or her back pocket" — you believe in that, so do some other people, but many people are either of a different religion which does not call their god "god" or has multiple gods or do not believe in any kind of deity. "In God we trust" can be interpreted as any singular deity, but for polytheists, atheists and agnostics, the phrase means absolutely nothing and it's not something we believe in. The first amendment of the Constitution of the United States guarantees religious freedom for every citizen, so if I, as an atheist, move to the US and get through all the legal stuff, and get a green card, I'm free to not believe. Putting "in God we trust" is not a representation of that, it shouldn't be "in no god we trust" either, or "in Allah we trust", just nothing related to one religion thus excluding part of the population.

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    • I am not interested in discussing politics or religion with you, I do that enough in my own family on a Daily basis and I am only interested in helping others out with relationships.

    • If you are "only interested in helping others out with relationships", then why did you even bother answering this question? And why did you keep going if you weren't interested? I wrote a long comment on your opinion, you could've just said "I'm not interested in discussing that" and left, but instead you make a few claims about not being a hater, you call Obama a Muslim because you're really well-educated, you block me because you can, you use @jacquesvol's comment against me even though I don't see how you could possibly interpret it as being against me, and try to teach me "a lesson", because, of course, I need a lesson. At this point I'm not even discussing "in God we trust" on money anymore, I'm calling you out on your nonsense. The last few replies have all been about the discussion about religion, not a discussion about religion itself. If you wanna discuss religion with your family, go ahead, I'm sure they all answer yes to everything you say.

  • No. Sure society has become overly-PC as of late but there's no reason to remove a part of a country's culture and history for this reason. This reminds me of something I heard a few years ago where some crazy feminists where petitioning to alter or remove this part of the Canadian anthem-
    True patriot love in all thy sons command.

    Because it said sons, therefore excluding females. What in the fuck. Really now?

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    • I don't really think those are comparable. Even as a feminist changing the anthem would be ridiculous, "sons" isn't supposed to stand for men only, whereas "in god we trust" is printed on American money, while the first amendment of the United States says that there should be freedom of religion. The meaning of that is pretty unmistakeable, "in god we trust" can't possibly mean "in god or the nonexistent god or Allah or Zeus we trust", and reinforces the idea of the US as a Christian nation.

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    • I agree with you totally on this one and I am a person who doesn't agree with religion in schools or to do with laws etc, but those images are part of your cultural history. When new bills get designed then maybe remove the slogans, but why bother making a stink for the sake of it? Sounds real petty to me.

    • Actually it is accepted as the God of Christianity and is represented that way as well. The paper money had it added to it during the cold war to identify US as being a Christian nation going up against the evil nations of the world for Christian freedoms. Today that effect is felt all through the US political spectrum. The US was never set up to be a Christian Nation and in fact separated from a country that was identified as such.

  • I just think people should stop being so butt hurt over everything.

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  • It sounds like - In "made up, invisible being in the sky" we trust - to me. It has no importance to me so you don't really want them to trust that. It would be good but it wouldn't happen in America.

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  • No I don't think it should be changed. It's a part of our history and the foundation of this country. It hurts no one, it's just a word.

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    • The US wasn't founded on Christianity at all.

    • The US was founded on principals of the time. Suck as John Lockes philosophy. They use of God was to appeal to the leaders of Britian since it was a Christian Nation with its own Church. The concept of the country being a Christian one has evolved over the year of our nation. It really came into being during the cold war. When we identified as the Good guy and had God on our side.

What Guys Said 23

  • I don't think it should be removed from our currency, as it is still an important part of US history, but it shouldn't be added to anything from now on. Buildings, documents, etc.

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    • Also, if a few words on our money can offend someone so much, then they're gonna have a bad time

    • important part of US history It was only added on coins after the Civil war and on bills only in 1955 or so, by Eisenhower, thus not that important.

  • It was a foolish idea by Dwight Eisenhower.

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  • Yes, it was only added during the Cold War when we thought Communism was a threat. Now that the Soviet Union has collapsed the statement has become useless. Besides the US currency is losing its value and the price to make a penny is now more than a penny, so if we cut back on the raised letters of "In God We Trust" we could save some cash.

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    • I think the penny should be discontinued altogether

    • It was added on coins after the Civil War, to soothe Southern people a bit.

  • I'm non-religious but I really couldn't care less what the money says on it.

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  • Yes, it should be removed. It is a violation of the non-establishment of religion. However, furthermore, there shouldn't be a government currency. There should be a free market in currencies.

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  • I don't know but I'd want that pyramid off it more..

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  • Dear, there is nothing in the money that says in god we trust. "E Pluribus Unum" translated from latin means "from many to one" (it does not mean in god we trust, contrary to popular belief). The reason "E Pluribus Unum" e. g. "From many to one") is on coins is because it refrers to the individual 50 States falling under the authority of the Federal government. This was printed on currency after the civil war, which was a war to separate the Confederacy from the federal government and it's laws. Hope this helps.

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    • One more thing, the Answer by red thread points out that the practice of printing "E Pluribus Unum" was in 1864, rather than 1865 (which I incorrectly thought). It was pointing out the purpose of the Civil War at the tail end of it, that it was to make a single uniform government authority (the federal government) over the individual States (not 50 at that time although there is now). Thank you for the great question : )

  • I would theoretically like to remove it as an irreligious person and supporter of secularism, but the time and money to do so would really be a waste. I'd prefer if that money went to something actually helping people in need within our nation.

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  • Yes, and from courtrooms too

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  • If anything should be changed about the dollar it should be in different sizes for the notes so that blind people can recognise what note they are holding...

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    • Indeed, euro bills and coins can be recognized by blind people too.

  • God is not owned by one religion, one can even believe in the concept of a God without buying into any organized religion. So it really doesn't matter.
    So it really doesn't matter, but its interesting to note that religion and the value of fiat currency both depend on faith. Ie the purposeful suspension of critical thinking

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    • Yes but the US has atheists as well, don't you think it's hypocritical to group every American as a believer?

    • maybe, but like I said I view at as more of a joke. You know your fiat is just as real as god

    • You might also think it's shorthand for "In God we trust, all others pay cash!"

  • You can always count on atheists to get offended at absolutely everything and anything.

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    • I'm not offended. I just think it's wrong in a country which has a constitution that guarantees freedom of religion.

    • You can always count on Christians to try to offend non Christians at absolutely everything and anything because [ceating the drums !]CHRISTIANS OWN the ABSOLUTE TRUTH ! Do away with heathen and pagans and non believers.

  • I give 0 fucks about what's printed on... as long as it's legit mone I'm good

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  • I'm more concerned about the fact that a private bank issues our fiat currency. Hopefully we return to gold or silver backed currency again.

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  • I do. And as a Christian I do not want anything related to Christianity in the US government.

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  • Truth is never lost.

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  • Belief in God (held by 85% of U. S. residents) is not the same as ratifying a Religion, which is covered under "Separation of Church and State", i. e. it would be illegal to make Lutheranism the official State Government of the U. S. Therefore, since 85% of people think their is a God, and it's not specific to a religion, the Motto should stay on the coinage and currency.

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    • What about the other 15%?

    • @jacquesvol Majority wins. OR are you going to claim that this kid in Chicago (n all major news outlets about a year ago) who is so allergic to peanuts that he can get allergic if someone within ONE MILE has eaten a peanut has the right to stop all people from eating peanuts, banning it at school grounds (they already did that for him) and having students get written up if they eat it prior to school? I think common sense prevails and that kid should go somewhere else, because the damage to the majority of accommodating his needs far outweighs the good of accommodating him. What about the 45% or so who never voted for Obama? Do they get their own Republic somewhere not subject to his rule?

  • Democracy= rule by majority
    Religious Majority in America= Christians

    No I think it is representing America quite well. If we have a religious minority that disagrees then they can kindly leave, if they chose to immigrate here then why should we change our stuff to accommodate for them? If they were born here, well too bad, this isn't a big deal at all, the money has said "In God we trust" since who knows when, the Constitution and Declaration of Independence make specific references to God, should we change those 2? They have gotten us through 250 years of being the greatest country on the face of the earth, 50 years ago you didn't see people calling for a change, because the politically corrects (like you) weren't around. How about instead of trying to change our government, you go overseas and save other people's governments. Religious minorities have it EASY here compared to literally everywhere else in the world. In the Middle East the Christians are killed because of their beliefs, in Africa Muslims and Christians alike are being killed because of their religion, in China religious leaders are arrested by the government and imprisoned for no real reason. In India if you say you are a Christian you will be hated in some regions, denied service, taunted, etc. Maybe instead of trying to change little things like what our money says (which honestly at this point has lost its meaning anyway, when someone sneezes we say "bless you" right? You dont think of what the words mean, you just say it because it has become part of our language, same thing here,) you are fighting a very stupid battle, when there are people overseas being tortured, killed, and discriminated against for there religion. Leave the US and go help them before you try to change this little itty bitty part of our country.

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    • The first Amendment of the US says that there should be freedom of religion. There might be a Christian majority, but not everyone is Christian, and if religious minorities should "kindly leave" there is no freedom of religion present. The US is NOT a Christian nation by any means, as big a majority as Christians are, it does not matter.

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    • Anonymous you wrote
      Democracy= rule by majority
      Religious Majority in America= Christians

    • Did you already convert?

  • I couldn't care less.

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  • Yes, it should be removed. We have separation of church and state in this country, or at least we did. What if the currency said "In Allah We Trust" or "In Thor We Trust" instead? Christians would be outraged, wouldn't they? And justifiably so, because our currency shouldn't presume a belief in a particular deity. Including that phrase on our currency wasn't a good idea back in the 1950s, and it's not a good idea today. People are free to worship as they choose; just keep it off the currency. Money is for financial transactions, not religious propaganda.

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  • Given that our currency isn't backed up by anything of actual value and is largely equally fictitious, it seems oddly appropriate and symbolic to leave the phrase right where it is.

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  • Why should it be

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  • Everyone needs to quit Piss moaning and groaning about everything.
    Suck it up buttercup and move on

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