Do you think everyone should have to work a service based job in their life?

Like maybe as a high school credit or something?

I just feel so many people have no idea what it is like to handle people on a daily basis, or to live off tips or something.

I just thinkt he world would be a better place, and more people would be respectful of others for the rest of their lives... what about you?


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Most Helpful Girl

  • Yes!!! I didn't really appreciate what those people do till I got a holiday job as a sales assistant for 2 months. I look at people in service totally different now. The hours are long, pay often bad and the people sometimes really do it just cause they have to and are struggling with money. My manager worked for minimum money to keep her family fed and taken care of. For that she worked really insane hours, had to be on her feet all day and seldom got to see her children.

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Most Helpful Guy

  • No, I don't. However, I do think that service in America (and in some other countries) is rather fucked up. The fact that waiters or bar ladies in the US have to live off tips is totally insane and wrong. The way to solve this is not to make everyone work in service based jobs once and make them empathetic but rather give the service staff decent working rights and working conditions. Unfortunately, in America (and in some other countries), people who work in service based jobs get treated like shit. This is particularly terrible since their job is already very tough and exhausting. One thing that should definitely be changed is that service staff get a decent minimum wage. If you come to Europe some time, you will see that tips are not considered mandatory here. In America, it's considered an insult not to give any tip. You're considered to be a stingy, egoistic prick if you just get up without giving any tip. That is because in America, waiters and bar maids need your tip. That's what they live off. Obviously, this is screwed up. The original idea of tips is that they're something extra, on top of the normal salary, something they get for being particularly friendly or fast. In continental Europe, tipping is considered optional and the amount you tip can depend on how much money you generally own/make. For example I'm a poor Uni student, so I usually give around 5% of what I consumed. If the service was exceptionally good, I raise my tip to 10%. This only works because service employees in Europe still get a decent salary at the end of the month. You don't get rich with this job but it's enough to make ends meet (in America, as far as I know, this is not really the case). For example my brother worked as a waiter and barkeeper for several years and he earned about the equivalent of a secretary. Along with the 400-500 bucks of tip he got per month, that was enough for him to live without any worries. But there are also other things that should be changed, for example service employees shouldn't have to work such long hours. Society shouldn't look down on service employees as it is the case in the US, society should treat them really well and show them appreciation for the tough job they're doing (especially since Americans take their waiters' friendliness and obligingness for granted. Most Americans aren't even aware of the fact that they probably have the nicest waiters in the world. Waiters in Europe are often rude, pushy or let you wait for eternities)

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    • Yes, I lived in Europe for a long time, and I loved having not having tip (or tax not included)! I think it was worth the less great service to not have people basically slaving away and then dealing with people's bad attitudes.

      While I agree with virtually everything you are saying, how do you think to go about changing it?

      I suggested a simple 10 hours a week while in school because this way it does not hurt companies or small restaurant owners, and US mentality is so anti workers rights nothing comprehensive would pass in my opinion... I guess what I am trying to say, is that I agree with you, but realistically I am not sure how the US would go about making substantial progress here.

    • Well, I guess as a temporary solution this could work. It's certainly an interesting idea. It would be a good step to raise awareness. However, I also think the final goal should always be kept in sight: improving working conditions for service employees. You're right that Americans are very much anti-workers but I don't think that's an inherent part of American mentality, it's mostly something Americans were brainwashed into thinking. Politically, many Americans elect politicians who in fact work completely against their own voters' interest. This only works because the media does a great job at keeping people inside this little bubble where calling for decent workers' rights is considered communist bullshit and helping the rich some sort of virtue. Back in the 1930s and 1940s, America used to have very strong workers' unions. So yes, I find your idea good, but I would like it even better to see average low and middle class Americans start standing up for their rights again.

What Girls Said 4

  • As someone who works in retail, I absolutely think everyone should have to work in this sector at least once in their lifetime.

    As a manager, hell no. I don't want a bunch of HS kids coming into my store and working for credit. I want people who are excited and passionate about coming to work. Not someone who is forced to come in each day because it is part of the curriculum. All I can think of is the wasted hours on training a HS student who would be there for what? A month? That's not worth my time and effort when I would rather be putting in my time working alongside my permanent employees.

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    • Ya, as a department manager, that is my exact problem... though I find the majority of high school kids, in my area at least, only take a job to please their parents. I guess the jobs I have had rarely have permanent employees, it is pretty common for people to not last a year- 3 months and people get excited lol

  • I hope not! That would add more stress to HS! But even if they did which they have done in parts of the america kids don't care at all! Yes some well but not all!

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  • Hell yes, I worked in a supermarket for a few years and it taught me so much in terms of how to interact with the public well. I then got a job in retail and had so many skills that the other workers didn't have. I think it's a brilliant idea to encourage people to get jobs like that so they have those life skills.

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  • Yeah I think some people should realize how mean they can be or sound like to a service worker. People hurt such employees even without realizing it.

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What Guys Said 12

  • No, I don't. I don't wanna have to deal with some guy that was forced to take a job he doesn't want to participate in especially if it's a service related position.

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  • No and you can't make people be good. So, what's the point? That's similar to saying that forcing people to serve their country will make them more interested or appreciative of their country.

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  • The argument "you don't know how it's like so you have to go through it" is an old and tired one. No, not every one has to do it. I for one have not yet done it and hopefully I won't.

    But that doesn't mean that people who haven't done it don't have the right to judge the service industry for poor service quality or what not.

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    • That's not the point, the point is people who have to work service based jobs are treated with disrespect. People look down upon them like they're trash. That is the experience you'll get a service worker is unforgettable because it'll teach you how shit people are to other people.

      You are a fine example of why people should get a service job. At the end of the day, no matter how good your service is - you will be treated like horseshit over, and over again until you quit or retire.

    • @dotydot I personally don't think I need a service job because I don't treat people in that field as shit. I only complain if I have legitimate reasons to do that.

    • Sorry, I misinterpreted what you were saying. But I still believe everyone working a service based job will make the world a better place.

  • Everyone should work in a restaurant at least once. Why?
    -It shows you had much shit others have to go through to say, get you a meal to your table.
    -Teaches you discipline.
    -Shows you how much minimal skills jobs suck, and why you should get an education.

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  • Is definitely beneficial. I worked restaurant jobs as a kid and as a telemarketer through high school. Built thick skin from that shitty job lol

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  • I've worked service jobs, so I am pretty tolerant of others who work them when they've having a bad time. Wilfully poor or lazy service won't fly with me, however.

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  • Yup.

    I also beleive everyone should serve in the military, and experience a few days in a jail.

    Multiple perspectives on life makes it easier for everyone.

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  • no, if you are willing to take a job in food service that is on you, but don't force people to live your hell just in the hopes of getting more tips

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    • Why do you think it is willing? Food and retail jobs are sometimes the only real option for millions of Americans...

      Though your opinion is exactly what a little dose of having to deal with people such as yourself would solve.

    • not really, I work at Walmart and some of the worst customers I get are also Walmart employees or have been in the past

    • Oh wow! interesting... Usually my favorite people to help are the ones who have worked service jobs, because they know what it is like.

      very interesting.

  • Yes. I work in retail and I've often thought the same thing. If more people saw service jobs from our perspective I think people would be a lot less rude and more understanding.

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  • Absolutely. It would help a lot of people gain the perspective.

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  • I think no one should have to go through that kind of hell. Speaking from experience.

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    • Wouldn't it be a little less hellish if everyone knew what it was like though? I have nothing against these fields, I actually enjoy it, I just hate that roughly half of the people I am trying to help see me as some kind of slave, when they have no idea how to do my job.

    • Thing is most people tend to quickly forget what hell is like when they're on the other side and in a position of power to boot. I say, let machines handle everything.

  • Absolutely! I've learned more about life and people while working in service related job for a few months than by formal education. You become more appreciative and understanding, you see things from a different perspective and it's a valuable experience, both for work and for life and relations with people in general.

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