So if most of you don't belive in God then why you celebrate Christmas?

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Most Helpful Guy

  • Christianity does not own Christmas, nor is it a Christian creation.
    Christmas coincides with the Winter solstice.
    Egyptians celebrated the rebirth of the god Horus.
    Romans celebrated Dies Natalis Solis Invicti and the Saturnalia,
    Greek had the festival of Poseidon,
    Byzantine Brumalia was actually called a festival of Cronos
    Jews celebrate Hanukkah
    Nordic and German celebrated Yule
    Hindu celebrate Uttarayana
    Buddhists have Bodhi day
    Chinese the Dōngzhì Festival
    Persian Sadeh
    In the Zoroastrian religion the birth of Mithra is celebrated at the eve of the winter solstice called Shab-e Yalda in Farsi.
    Babylonian had the Festivals for Marduk and for Akitu


    In Mesopotamia, the people of Babylon held a festival for the god Marduk, or Enlil or Marcuk, who they believed created the world out of chaos. At the darkest time of the year a substitute person was needed who could be held responsible for the sins that they had committed during the past year. After the substitute or "scapegoat" was killed, the sun would come back again. There would be a lot of celebrating and visiting. The Babylonians would feast for 12 days and often wore masks as they brought gifts to many homes.

    Christianity merely grafted their Jesus legend on that period. Is there any record in the Bible of anyone observing Christmas?

    It was probably introduced in Rome during the 4th century. (by migrating the Epiphany celebrations to the Winter Solstice celebrations.)

    Christianity does not own Christmas, nor is it a Christian creation.
    Christmas coincides with the Winter solstice.
    Egyptians celebrated the rebirth of the god Horus.
    Romans celebrated Dies Natalis Solis Invicti and the Saturnalia,
    Greek had the festival of Poseidon,
    Byzantine Brumalia was actually called a festival of Cronos
    Jews celebrate Hanukkah
    Nordic and German celebrated Yule
    Hindu celebrate Uttarayana
    Buddhists have Bodhi day
    Chinese the Dōngzhì Festival
    Persian Sadeh
    In the Zoroastrian religion the birth of Mithra is celebrated at the eve of the winter solstice called Shab-e Yalda in Farsi.
    Babylonian had the Festivals for Marduk and for Akitu


    In Mesopotamia, the people of Babylon held a festival for the god Marduk, or Enlil or Marcuk, who they believed created the world out of chaos. At the darkest time of the year a substitute person was needed who could be held responsible for the sins that they had committed during the past year. After the substitute or "

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    • was needed who could be held responsible for the sins that they had committed during the past year. After the substitute or "scapegoat" was killed, the sun would come back again. There would be a lot of celebrating and visiting. The Babylonians would feast for 12 days and often wore masks as they brought gifts to many homes.

      Christianity merely grafted their Jesus legend on that period. Is there any record in the Bible of anyone observing Christmas?

      It was probably introduced in Rome during the 4th century. (by migrating the Epiphany celebrations to the Winter Solstice celebrations.)

      Christianity does not own Christmas, nor is it a Christian creation.
      Christmas coincides with the Winter solstice.
      Egyptians celebrated the rebirth of the god Horus.
      Romans celebrated Dies Natalis Solis Invicti and the Saturnalia,
      Greek had the festival of Poseidon,
      Byzantine Brumalia was actually called a festival of Cronos
      Jews celebrate Hanukkah
      Nordic and German celebrated Yule

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    • He questioned the logic of non-RELIGIOUS people celebrating Christmas.

    • Read the question once more.

Most Helpful Girl

  • Many of the ways we celebrate Christmas aren't related to Christianity at all. It's a fun celebration, it's an excuse to visit family and spoil my relatives, and the typical decorations are absolutely beautiful. This wasn't supposed to be a Christian holiday to begin with. :P

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What Guys Said 19

  • Because it's a pagan holiday, and because the reasons why the pagans celebrated a holiday at the winter solstice are still valid reasons to want a holiday today. The solstice celebration welcomes the return of the sun.

    Holly, ivy, mistletoe... pagan. Roman and Norse.

    Lights and candles at the solstice? Pagan, to celebrate the return of the light.

    Yule log in the fire... Norse pagan version of this, for the solstice.

    Gift giving? Pagan, from the Roman winter holiday called Saturnalia, which included toys and edible treats.

    Christmas trees? Saturnalia again. Same with hanging ornaments, which was also done by Norse pagans to honour Odin for the solstice.

    Santa Claus was taken from Odin, his reindeer emerged from stories of Odin's horse (and the first stories that turned Odin into Sinter Klaus kept his horse, it wasn't until later that they became reindeer). The stockings by the fire were supposed to be there to leave little bits of hay as a present to his horse Sleipnir. The modern view of Santa Claus with the red outfit is actually just from capitalist marketing. His origins are Pagan though.

    The Date of the 25th? Pagan. Christmas is on the 25th because that's when the pagans were already celebrating. Saturnalia, Yule (the Northern European pagan celebration) were all happening around then. Early Christians didn't celebrate the birth of Jesus, and there was nothing about him being born in the middle of winter. The holiday for Sol Invictus (the Unconquered Sun... a Syrian god later adopted as a chief god of the Roman Empire) was December 25.

    Caroling began as wassailing, part of pre-Christian fertility rites, where villagers traveled through fields and orchard in the middle of winter, singing and shouting to drive away spirits that might inhibit future crop growth. It didn't happen in churches until the 13th century.

    Christmas ham is leftover from the sacrifice of the yule-boar, sonargoltr.

    The real question, I suppose, should be why do Christians celebrate pagan holidays so blatantly? Because it's fun. The pagans did it because the solstice was dark and crappy and miserable. So they had a party with lights and crap to make the darkness bearable. The darkness and shitty weather is still dark and shitty. It's still fun to have a party at that time of year, even if holidays were appropriated by Christians.

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    • And because the Church found it interesting to adopt and grab Winter Solstice for their Jesus: everybody was celebrating it, thus it was good publicity for their church.

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    • He never mentioned Christianity, and we don't need it anymore. It's celebrated in America because it was founded on Christianity, so we have to follow the rules they set for us. We would have figured out another way to celebrate at this time. It has nothing to do with those who came before us.

    • The implication, given the wording and context of the question, was that there was something weird about people that don't believe in God celebrating a Christian holiday. My point was that the holiday is not a Christian holiday - it is Christian in name only, not practice. And that there were reasons why there were holidays at that time of year. And that those reasons to want a holiday are universal, pre-date modern religion, and are still applicable.

      The TL:DR version, if the rest is too confusing for you, is: people that do not believe in God celebrate Christmas because Christmas has nothing to do with God, except in name, and people, Christian and non-christian alike, have felt a need to celebrate during that time of year. It is fun. And fun is good.

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  • Because REAL Christmas doesn't belong to Christianity, they stole it. It was a pagan holiday turned into Christian, so yeah.

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  • Christmas has a cultural component too, it's not all Christian. Just ask the guys fighting over the TVs on Black Friday lol

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  • Because Christians manufactured it and co-opted pagan traditions as a means to convert pagans who all had their own holidays at the same time of the year. It more or less failed and fell out of favor among many christian sects for centuries because of its pagan roots, only to be resurrected in the 19th century as a marketing ploy. It's very much a secular holiday.

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  • Because Christmas is a community holiday. Christians gave it to us. It's about giving, and happiness.

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    • Christmas wasn't Christian. Christians merely moved Epiphany to Dec 24 to coincide with all pagan celebrations. Jesus was NOT born on Dec 24.

  • It's not a Christian holiday originally. Plus you don't have to believe in God to be apart of the festivities. It's essentially a day to party that everyone gets work off to celebrate.

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  • Christmas has become a cultural thing rather than religious. Its as simple as that.

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    • Hooray, someone who actually understood the question! You deserve a high five, good sir. ✋

  • Because it has nothing to do with God besides the name. What part of opening up presents around a tree and eating cookies has to do with God?

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    • Umm is when jesus was born so it does have something.

    • Jesus was supposedly born in the Spring according to the bible. Only the name. You should do your homework before making these baseless accusations at atheists celebrating Christmas.
      Also, this has been asked like a million times before to atheists and we've all pointed out how this is actually a pagan holiday.

    • It isn't. Jesus wasn't born on Christmas.

  • I wouldn't, unfortunately my family are Christian, so I have to tag along. Lol My athiest cousin and myself were told to leave the prayer table this year. I will teach my children that Christmas is the same as Halloween. Humans love celebrating different avenues of what makes us human, fun/horror on Halloween and family on Christmas.

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  • Because the religious part of it has been long lost.

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  • Well , simply because we can :P Truth is though that Christmas really isn't 100% Christian. What do I mean? Well, it has many pagan roots. I mean many. An easy example is Saturnalia (predecessor of Christmas). So you can't really act like it's something christian only. It has become a tradition. Simply those who are Christians add the religious parts (ex. birth of Jesus & going to church etc.). The rest simply enjoy the food and gifts.

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  • Because christians stole a pagan holiday.

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  • It's a pagan holiday :)

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  • cos it's fun.

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  • Presents are fun.

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  • Hypocrisy!!!

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  • Because us atheists have nothing to celebrate :(

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  • Well first it's a pagan holiday that turned into a tradition and then it's passed on as a fun day to give presents.

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What Girls Said 13

  • Cause for me Christmas has nothing to do with God, it's just a tradition, a nice, lovely holiday.

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  • Christmas is so dar removed from religion its laughable that Christians think its actually about jesus anymore.

    A tree doesn't represent Jesus. Nor do snowmen and santas and reindeer. The polar express has nothing to do with Jesus nor does frosty the snowman.

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  • My mothers Christian, and it's a big holiday here, even if you're not religious it's a good excuse to get family together

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  • FAMILY TIME! FOOD! and FREE GIFTS!

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  • Over time I feel Christmas has lost its religious meaning. It's still there, but a lot of people turned it into a day where it's about spending time with family and opening presents and they don't care about the religious part of it

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  • Because money and materialistic things.

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    • Lol money?

    • Yep, I usually get money and presents from my grandparents. And this year I just asked for money for trip from my parents so that's all I'm getting from them.

  • Yes! Christmas is a religious holiday. Everyone wants to say "religion should be taken out of everything" until they can benefit from it with free shit!!

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    • Uhm. Firstly, it ain't even a Christian holiday really, it's a holiday the Christians stole from the pagans. But secondly, if y'all didn't want Christmas to be non-religious, then y'all shouldn't have made it that way. It's Christians who caused Christmas to be cultural rather than religious, both by placing it on top of all the other non-Christian winter holidays in an attempt to convert people and by making it such a humongous cultural event that non-Christians have no hope of avoiding it anyway.

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    • Hypocritical if you ask me.

    • Um, that's not true either. Did you read the article? Because the whole Yule log thing is actually mentioned in it. And mistletoe and Christmas trees also were pagan traditions before they were Christian. here:

      Mistletoe: www.history.com/.../why-do-we-kiss-under-the-mistletoe
      Christmas trees: www.history.com/.../history-of-christmas-trees

      So basically none of what you're saying is true. Christmas is holiday pagan in origin and made up of pagan traditions that Christians took for themselves. And since I cited my sources, perhaps you'd like to cite some if what you're saying actually is accurate?

  • I believe and around 60% of gagers or more believe in God.

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  • I celebrate it because I do believe in God

    Other may do it because, lets admit it, but the comercial side of it is fun.

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  • for the presents?

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  • They're stupid 😂😂

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  • I don't believe in God. Christmas for me is just a time to be away from work and other usual routine stuff... and be with family and good friends. Relaxing, eating, drinking, catching up and just switching off for a few days a year

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  • Because its a holiday to celebrate...

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