Is it "she's disabled" or "she has a disability"?

Do you know the correct answer? ;)

  • She's disabled
    Vote A
  • She has a disability
    Vote B
Select a gender to cast your vote:
I'm a GirlI'm a Guy

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Most Helpful Guy

Most Helpful Girl

  • Not this bullshit...

    " let's compare a disability to any other thing that can happen to you, like a broken leg.
    It wouldn't be right to say "she is a broken leg" because that broken leg doesn't define you as a person. You are not your disability you have a disability."

    You can't say someone IS a broken leg, cause that's totally not an adjective. However, disabled is, and thus, can be used to describe a person.

    We need to stop being a bunch of pansy asses who get offended by everything. If you hear "she's disabled" and take that to mean that she's nothing but a disability, that's a failure on your part.

    "She has a disability" what if I wanna cry and say "but she has MORE than just a disability!" What phrase do we use then?

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What Guys Said 17

  • I think as long as you avoid the word "Gimp", you should be alright.

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  • what is your question exactly? no details nothing?

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  • Both are fine

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    • let's compare a disability to any other thing that can happen to you, like a broken leg.
      It wouldn't be right to say "she is a broken leg" because that broken leg doesn't define you as a person. You are not your disability you have a disability.

    • Being disabled is usually considered permanent. The case of a broken leg would be a temporary disability and she'd be temporarily disabled. By the way I'm disabled

  • Either can work, but "She has a disability" would be more polite to the subject than the other option. So it depends on the usage and whether or not you want to characterize the person by their disability or if you want to identify them as having a disability.

    I love English.

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    • Also I suppose it would also depend on the length of time the disability is there. If you say "She's disabled," it also suggests a chronic issue, where "She has a disability," may still be chronic, but it doesn't imply anything about the period of time the issue is there.

  • The second one is a better way of saying, a more polite way. As a nurse, I would never say someone is disabled, but rather similar to "She has a disability" or She is unable to do certain things

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  • to me there is a big difference between the 2. an example of this is i have a disability do you hip problems but i'm not disabled. someone who can not take care of them selves at all is disabled.

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  • Either are acceptable, depending on the preference of the disabled girl.

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  • I voted B, but it's both really.

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  • she's disabled is ambiguous.

    thus for clarity you would use "she has a disability"

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  • Both work neither is wrong.

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  • both mean the same thing

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  • It's personal preference mostly.

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  • Whatever the politically correct have established it to be now it seems.

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  • Just use the one that makes you feel more self-righteous and better than everyone else.

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  • Trick question. I will not answer. I'm too cool for school

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  • It's all a matter of politeness. Nothing wrong with grammar of either.

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  • Both are fine

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What Girls Said 6

  • The PC way is to say someone 'has a disability' or is an individual 'with autism/depression', etc..

    That's what I've been told by many therapists/consultants that I worked with. I guess that's the preferred way to avoid labeling the individual as being defined by their disability or something, y'know?

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  • Having a disability is correct. "Being disabled" it not. A person with a disability is not defined by their disability. Similarly, you say "a person WITH cancer" and not "a cancer person".

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  • both of them can work, i just think the second sounds a bit more polite.

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  • Same thing with "autistic child" or "child with autism" (correct)

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  • They really aren't the same thing, (this is what they teach swimming instructors), the disability doesn't define the person, so if I'd have to pick I'd go with B, but even then if talking to a third party I'd rather it be '(name) is a girl with (name of disability)'

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  • Don't they mean the same thing?

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