How influential do you think parents can be over their children's political ideologies? Especially young children?

I just watched a video on a young girl who was being videotaped by her mom. Her mom then tells her they are going to see a certain political candidate. The girl who can't be older than 10 or 11, acts like this is the greatest thing since sliced bread. Seriously? What ten year even thinks of politics? I'm not going to say who the political candidate is. If I did, people who support that candidate will congratulate the child and say she's very smart, while the people who don't support the candidate will say she is being brainwashed. And then I'm going to get unbiased opinions. If my ten year old self went to political rally for any candidate, I would ask when we would be leaving five minutes after it starts. I would also bring a book or several to keep myself entertained. I actually know children who are influenced by their parents this way. I was babysitting my niece and she saw a commercial for a candidate her parents don't like. She screamed ew and ran out of the room. Seriously? She's 7.



0|2
17|41

What Guys Said 41

  • In the big picture I don't think it makes a huge difference. Parents have an influence on everything about the child. So that becomes part of the child. But a lot of other things matter also. With political stuff I think peers and the prevailing attitude of their immediate social world makes a bigger difference. Their social world is the physical area they live in, schools, media, social media, etc.

    I really don't see anything wrong with a parent taking a kid to see a political candidate. I think it's a good thing for a kid to experience. I think it has almost no influence on the kid's future political views. I think the prevailing memory will be of the atmosphere, not anything political. The crowds, the excitement, the security. I think it's an experience, not some kind of political indoctrination.

    It's extremely common for the kids to have opposing views about politics as their parents. Very often this is the simple case of young people being liberal, and becoming more conservative as they get older. Even besides that, it's very common for people to change political or social views during their life. I'd even say its the norm. People's political views are constantly being refined throughout their life.

    Very often siblings have similar political views, but it's not uncommon for them to be opposites. It's also not uncommon for all the siblings to have similar views as each other, but opposite as their parents. I haven't really thought about that one before, I'll have to start paying more attention.

    1|0
    0|0
    • 21d

      Something I just thought of. My brother and I were talking about this just a few days ago. My mother died at 77 and my father died at 85. Neither my brother or I knew where our parents were politically, other than guessing. They almost never talked about politics. They never mentioned who they voted for for any office. Every now and then we'd get some minor hints, but we are almost entirely guessing.

  • We are all influenced by a range of sources that may or may not be reliable and/or biased. You could argue that you can only really know anything that you have seen with your own eyes, but then even our eyes can deceive. We take as much information as is available to us at the time and we make a judgement based on our understanding of it. To what level we might understand that information depends on our knowledge, our experience and our intellect. As children we have all kinds of ideas and beliefs that we adjust as we become adults. As adults we have all kinds of ideas and beliefs that we adjust as we become older adults. It's a constant learning curve and we move along it as we go. Children might express views that have been handed to them on a plate, but they are children and it shouldn't be of any consequence to anyone else that they might hold such views at that time. We understand that they are children, that they are much more malleable than they will be when they are older. We should, if anything, be proud that they are expressing opinions. Opinions are there to be challenged and it is through this process that we learn and grow.

    Let's face it, we all believed in some crap or other when we were children that would make us cringe as adults. It doesn't really matter where we got it from because we wouldn't have had sufficient resource to form different opinions at the time anyway. That comes with age and experience and with independence.

    To summarise, apparently Santa Claus doesn't exist. I was so sure that he did...

    1|0
    0|0
  • Very influential. Just look at this mother kicking her son out just because he voted Trump in school, and he simply voted him cause he saw him on TV. You think this kid will ever vote against what her mom thinks? Of course not. This kid is already traumatized. Imagine all the kids out there who hear their parents threatening them if they support certain candidate, or hearing the parents talk awful about a candidate of a party?
    If the kid grows up hearing how awful a party is, s/he's very likely to be against that party when he grows up.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wX3RWz-tK8g

    1|2
    0|0
    • 21d

      Poor kid. I went to a very small elementary school when I was a kid. I remember some kids went on some sort of witch hunt and asked every classmate who their parents where supporting. One kid said his parents were supporting the unpopular candidate. Kids made fun of him and made him sit by himself at lunch.

    • Show All
    • 21d

      I wanted to say I think thats fake but after googling the fucked up thing is everything from the huffington post to Breitbart seems to indicate that its true

    • 21d

      No one gonna comment how he hit'em with the pink cheetah suitcase though? 😂😂😂😂

  • All kids are affected by their parents (on every subject matter to also include) political views as well as their school's advocated political views. It's not until college for many that they take time to discover what they believe and form their political views internally. Tho that is also largely affected by colleges as well, because in most cases they arr largely liberal. You have to hope for a good teacher in a class environment that encourages free thought and discussion. The only way to really form your own ideas is to read history and take time to think about it by yourself. Outside of that everyone you respect and/or love is a factor in what your view will end up being. It's difficult to be 100% grounded in yourself on all issues.

    I know for me I was raised in a very conservative home. Many ideas I didn't think about for myself until 16, 17, 18 and it wasn't until about 22 that most of my beliefs were uniquely mine and not simply handed down to me by others. I'm sure there are still beliefs I have that are conflicting and don't even realise it.

    1|1
    0|0
  • Kids' minds are impressionable, but not entirely malleable. You can influence a kid to think 1 way over another, but their beliefs are ultimately formed by their own morality, experiences from everyone around them (not just parents) and their own psychosis. Think about it I need a few instances:

    How many times do parents tell kids to not steal, not break the rules, not to hit others, don't drink, don't use drugs, etc and they do it anyways? Or you can tell a kid to not cheat on tests and they still do it. Friends, media and others around them are just as much of an influence, especially in a day where we aren't dependent on our parents, exclusively to tell us about the world and what's wrong and right. A child can go on a computer or phone or watch enough tv and form their opinions

    On top of that, take religion in the other instance. Just because you grow up in a religious or non religious family doesn't exactly make the individual religious. My family is stupid religious. I grew up in the church like no ones business... I still don't believe in god. It just doesn't click to me. It doesn't make sense, logically

    As for why that is is just as much about the individual's experiences as much as it is the psychology. Going back to religion, it's been scientifically proven that the level of religiousness an individual has has to do with specific parts of the brain as well. So to connect the dots, on top of certain beliefs, there's something biological and genetic that makes a person think and believe the way they do

    This isn't to say that kids aren't impressionable, just a reminder. What I'm saying is while you can tell and form a kid's belief to believe what they want, their ultimate subconscious is generally formed on more factors than just a parent telling them so, and there are more external factors at play. You see your friends and teachers at least 8 hours a day. 8 hours is sleeping and probably 30% of the other 8 hours is basically individuals doing their own thing, typically, independent of their parents. Watching tv, phone, computer, etc

    1|0
    0|0
  • I don't know - This election has just seemed to take everything too far - I am 47 and seen bitter elections/referendums but I have never seen anything like "Brexit" or the "US Election" - Families not talking, adults scuffling at children's birthday parties.

    2|1
    0|0
    • 21d

      Tell me about it. My brother in law and I support opposing candidates and I'm lucky to get a single hello out of him every time he sees me. For my sisters sake, I won't talk politics during the holiday dinners. She wants it to be a drama-free zone.

  • Yes, parents have a ton of influence. That is why the Bible says, "Train up a child in the way that they should go, and when they are older, they will not depart from it." (Proverbs 22:6) which is why we see so many broken children because their parents never gave a sh*t.

    1|0
    0|0
  • Oh they are incredibly influential but more so from the way they behave opposed to what they actually teach them. Children learn more from imitation than they do from lectures. They try to emulate their parents, so if they see their parents supporting one particular candidate over the other, they will do the same. I was opposite however. The majority of my family were Democrats so I went Republican just to be the oddball because I was somewhat rebellious.

    2|2
    0|0
  • Naturally parents have influence over their child - but growing up is also about any maturing person learning and questioning themselves. Aka just because the parents teached something doesn't mean the child has to blindly follow it.
    There are quite a few things I do NOT agree with what I was teached, because I have made my own views with time and experience.

    That's what becoming independent of your parents means. Not just moving out of your home, but also making your own conclusions.

    2|1
    0|0
  • Parents try to instill their values, morals and religion in their child from a young age which they will take with them the rest of their lives. Thats how good parents should raise their kids and when the child grows up they decide for themselves how much of any of what their parents taught them has worth. Generally kids whos parents do this grow up to be good people contributing much to society though not always the case, good parents can raise bad evil people as much as bad evil parents can raise good people but there is no doubt that having two good parents is an important major advantage growing up.
    I would take a guess that the little girl being brought to political rally had conservative parents which is not surprising as conservatives try to teach there kids the importance of voting and get them to follow their political beliefs.

    2|0
    0|0
    • 21d

      My liberal cousins, a gay couple are taking their 9 year old daughter to protest at the white house in January, so strong political beliefs are definitely on both sides.

    • Show All
    • 21d

      https://youtu.be/J6kAtdwNJ5s
      ... oh I get why January. . duh is me.

    • 20d

      Haha! It's okay, I did the same thing when they told me.

  • Very influential. Political alignment is often like religion, it's brainwash into the kid at a young age based on what their parents believe is the right party. Your parents are a democrat chances are you will have the same alignment unless of course you educate yourself and have an open mind to listen to both sides before picking sides.

    1|0
    0|0
  • I agree with you children shouldn't be pulled into politics by their parents.
    My parents never influenced me in politics but my family was always into it.
    My dad ran for Committee man for the area i use to live and his opponent
    came to our house to campaign , i told the guy best wishes and may the best man win. Well it was a tie and my dad had to take a coin toss and he won
    so he won it for Committee man for our area. A Committee person works
    at polls for the party running for office. ( Governor, Congress, Senator etc)

    1|0
    0|1
  • As young children people can be completely influenced. When people grow older though, I think that the influence is significantly smaller, maybe even non existent if the person has a solid way of thinking according to its own world views.

    1|0
    0|0
  • They can completely shape them. Children are influencable, malleable. Behaviours of adults the kids are around rub off on the kids. They learn from everyone around them, how to act, how to speak, thoughts... even if they don't understand it, they repeat it.

    If you teach your kid to be mini hitler, chances are he'll stay that way when he grows up.
    If you teach your kid to be mini jesus, chances are he'll stay that way when he grows up.

    1|0
    0|0
  • Stuff like that makes me wanna bang my head against a wall...
    Until I would say on average college most people listen blindly to their parents or they rebel. Either way it is a non enlightened way of thinking of politics and values. Few of us form our own opinions. Those that do... Those people are the wise ones 🙂

    1|1
    0|0
  • My grandparents were somewhat different. My grandmother more or less favored the Democrats while my grandpa favors the Republicans. My grandmawas actually pretty conservative for a democrat as she was pro life unless certain circumstances. My grandoa is a hardnose republican without the racism though. I like to think Im more liberal than them but Im actually more moderate

    1|0
    0|0
  • The opinions parents speak rub off on young children. That goes beyond politics. I waa influenced by my parents opiniins until I was 13 or 14. It was at that age I started to take a good hard look at my beliefs and to put them through the ringer. It was then that I formed my own opinions on politics, ethics, religion, etc.

    1|0
    0|0
  • Extremely! I hate how some people brainwash their kids with nonsense
    My brother worked at a boys and girls club, and one of the boys described himself as gender fluid bisexual, wtf! you are 8 years old!

    Kids dont make those things up or decide that for themselves, they hear it from places! Most likely their parents.

    1|1
    0|0
    • 21d

      What the hell? Who thinks of that at 8?

    • 21d

      I know my brother told the parents about it, and supposedly they asked their son a bunch of weird questions and basically labeled him with that.

    • 21d

      That's weird. Ten years later, he will either still believe that or realize he was the biggest idiot as a kid. Whh do they feel the need to label him? He's 8 they should let him be a kid.

  • My ten year old self liked bush.
    I hated obama for years, (then look at the actual numbers. He actually did rather well)
    I've got some similar view to my parents and some very different views.
    My moms a moderate conservative and my dad is a liberal.
    I've got plenty of views they agree with and plenty they disagree greatly with

    1|0
    0|0
    • 21d

      I was the exact same way. Luckily my parents encourage free thinking. My brother in law is an asshole about it. It's not just politics. For example, if you don't like the same sports teams he does, he will like you less and less.

    • Show All
    • 21d

      No, the EMT sister is very open-minded and respects other people's opinions. This one is a teacher and the oldest sibling.

    • 21d

      A teacher, claims to be making real money.
      Pff.
      My dads a liberal and works at a tech company.
      The richest man in the world is a liberal

  • My 9 year old son told me he didn't want trump to win. I didn't put that into his head as i didn't have the conversation with him. I asked why? He didn't know. I asked who told you about trump being bad? He said i don't know. I am guessing he got that from school because a lot of his surrounding didn't like trump. I still don't know. All i am saying, it depends on the kid and they learn very fast maybe from the media or school or just one thing a adult said at one point and they record it.

    1|0
    0|0
  • Kids take their beliefs from their parents. Only as they mature and integrate more with society, do they begin to establish their own views.

    Our kids are aware of the political system and have classes in school.

    We would NOT take our kids to an adult-oriented function, however. School education and some home discussion is all they need. They need to be kids, not some political activist.

    1|1
    0|0
  • I think it's 50/50, since the fellow students, collegues and friends of course do have influence on a person as well.

    1|0
    0|0
  • Very and if they know how to and want to influence extremely.
    even unintended thing they do can influence some times for the better like if there working on projects and get them passionate about making things diy gets them to become really good at a trade. But also for the worse ie intentionally political candidates without knowledge of politics , religion and saying dont do something there intrested in thats massively beneficial but the parents don't realise.

    1|0
    0|0
  • When you're young, there are 2 main paths: whether you follow your parents' opinion, whether you strongly oppose to it.
    I believe your social environement is a bigger influence, especially for girls.
    Social rank plays too and is even more determinant than gender, as a low class woman has more in common with a low class man than with a woman of the high society.

    1|0
    1|0
  • Well I am going to bring up 2 reasons. One pertains to just Hillary Clinton. For a lot of young girls, a lot of parents got their kids excited knowing that they would be growing up in a world where there would be female presidents and that be normal. But for both sides, it seems with the political views, parents want to teach their kids at an early age what they believe to be right from wrong. They are the next generstion and whatever they learn and think to be true will carry on to the next world when the parents are gone. Parents also know if they wait too long to give them political views (especially conservative views since the country is getting more liberal as time continues) they may start to form political views themselves. Its the same thing with religion, making sure they believe it as fact before they are able to make their own decisions so they dont really have an option.

    1|0
    0|1
  • That would depend on how seriously the parents take politics.

    2|1
    0|0
  • Indefinitely. That's the responsibility of a parent. To do whatever they can to raise their children well. Everything that happens to a persons past effects who they become. Especially at young ages and with family.

    1|0
    0|0
  • A great deal over young. Not too much over adults. We're pretty much born who we are and our political identity might be destined by genetics.

    1|0
    0|1
  • They will most likely mimic what their parents tell them, but as they get older the vies they develop is completely up to them

    1|0
    0|0
  • well i saw a video of a 5 year old American crying the other day because trump won so quite a lot if they are forcing it down their throats

    1|0
    0|0
  • More from Guys
    11

What Girls Said 17

  • I already knew about adult matters such as politics and stuff way before 7. It's based on maturity and the parents more open minded to explain things to children and help them understand. That way the child can shape their own views and morals about life. The more you open up your children to understanding these things, the more mature and safe they will become as the get older, besides knowing right from wrong. It also boils down to personalities and character traits of the child. As they get older their minds shaped into their own unique identity. However, after I now know what all of that's about. I no longer bother myself with politics. Some kids are naive just as most people are, until the truth sets you free. But a lot of people would not like the truth. So it depends on the parents. It's not brainwashing if the child is willing in the first place. Everybody has free will. Sadly I believe a lot of people tend to forget that.

    1|0
    0|0
  • I lot. Both my parents are republican, and for the longest time, I just assumed I was also republican because that's what they told me. In my state, we vote by parties: we register to vote within a party and only vote within our party. We don't get to see the other people not in our party.

    It wasn't until this year when I took that what side are you on test that I discovered I was actually democrat. Now, I didn't exactly agree with candidates this year but, I agreed with the party's concepts.

    1|1
    0|0
  • Of course parents play a big role in a child becoming political or not especially when they are young. As kids get older and are exposed to more and more they begin to accept other influences. Starting with teachers then moving on to careers infuencers and friends. I was never very interested in politics in my house growing up but always knew how my parents tended to vote. As I got older and saw how government can directly impact my life and career, I got more interested in each partys candidates and agendas.

    1|0
    0|0
  • Mine have always extremely conservative my entire life, and even though I'm really not political at all, I've have mostly leaned libertarian my entire life. And my parents are the "my way is the only right way" types. I've have conservative Christian values drilled into my head all my life, and I've been an open proud Pagan since I was 14.

    1|0
    0|0
  • I'm almost exactly like my father politically and religiously, my Mom has very close ideologies than my father.
    So for me it's true :p

    1|2
    0|0
  • My daughter who is 10 is very interested in politics. She reads news articles and watches the news with me all of the time. Am I influencing her as I mother? I certainly hope so. That's how people get values instilled into them. It's sort of my job as a parent.
    I'm also teaching her to respect everyone, even people she disagrees with. There's a huge difference between influencing your kids and brainwashing them.
    When she's older she may vote/believe differently than I do and while that might be hard I'd accept it.

    1|0
    0|0
  • Well obviously but as they get older they make their own opinions. Same with religion, morals, and any other controversial topic.

    1|0
    0|0
  • Well it's difficult to avoid that topic if it's so important and heavily emphasized by the media. What are parents supposed to do when a kid asks them who they're voting for? I'd say as long as they are allowed to disagree with their parents they should be fine. For example I was raised Catholic and as I became more my own person I changed to Agnostic. It's not that difficult.

    1|0
    0|0
  • I think kids shouldn't be involved with politics until they are teens. They can learn the history of our country but I think they should be old enough to understand and make their own opinions. But I think parents influence their kids big time.

    1|1
    0|0
  • Both of my parents were conservative. My kids are actually a lot more liberal than I am... but they are sensible.

    1|1
    0|0
  • I was about 10 when I started taking an interest in politics and I was always interested in what was going on around the world. The thing about the child running out of the room because a politician her parents don't like is on TV is disturbing.

    1|1
    0|0
    • 21d

      She's my niece. I imagine she learned to hate that candidate from her father. I remember taking an interest in politics young. I only liked the candidates my parents liked but I didn't know who they were.

    • Show All
    • 21d

      Her father is very opinionated about his views. Which is a nice way of putting it. I don't ever talk politics with my niece because my parents encouraged free-thinking and I want her parents to do the same. He wasn't always this way but nowadays I am lucky to get a simple hello from him. It's not just politics. If you don't like the same sports teams he does, he will like you less. So very sad parents do this to their kids.

    • 21d

      You can be a positive influence in her life, distract her from such nonsense whenever you see her hopefully.

  • Children are terribly influenced by their parents. Children take over their parents behaviour: religion, speach, ideals, racism etc. I think no one should force it on them, not even discuss it until they're over the age of ten and starting to learn to think for themselves instead of following mummy or daddy.

    1|0
    0|0
  • Totally influential. That shit is learned, not instinctual.

    1|0
    0|0
  • I do understand what you are saying, but what if the child genuinely was curious about politics? What if they enjoyed learning about how their country's laws and processes work? When I was 10, I was not interested in politics. I'm not really interested in them now either, but I stay knowledgeable. I am hoping she wasn't coerced by her parents and she can continue to grow up to keep up with knowledge and make decisions she thinks is right.

    My parents and I differ politically from time to time. I do understand their point of view, but I also understand it's because of how they grew up that shaped their beliefs. They never pushed me one way or another, but rather to make my own judgements.

    1|0
    0|1
  • Somewhat influencial, it depends on the parents.
    My family has always kept their distance of politics, unless there is a really good valid reason to get close.

    1|0
    0|0
  • Most children around that age and below share their parents opinions on politics and religion. As long as the parents are sharing thier opinions in an unimposing non forceful way, I don't see anything wrong with it. That 10 year old is on the train ride to finding her own identity. Soon enough she'll form her own opinions about the world whether or not she shares them with her parents or not.

    1|0
    0|0
  • verily ('-' )

    1|0
    0|0
Loading...