Say you have an ex in a difficult situation. Things ended badly, but you're the only one who can possibly help them. Would you?

Anonymous
Mistakes were made by both parties leading to the breakup.

We went through a period of very high stress during which I said some things I have regretted ever since (my parents so vehemently opposed our relationship in the beginning that they threatened to not only disinherit me, but also kick my younger sister out of their house because I told her before them and she kept it secret - my girlfriend was a nonpracticing Muslim, they're hardcore right-wing evangelical Christians).

My (now ex) girlfriend, I have learned, tended to bottle up her concerns and her anger and her pain until it exploded. After a two-week vacation together where everything seemed fine, a week later she came to me upset about things from up to a year earlier which I had thought were long-since resolved.

There were some misunderstandings. Assumptions were made on her part without asking for clarification. Things went undiscussed which should have been discussed, which I feel could have been resolved had she been more forthcoming with these concerns. It's complicated.

Short version, she broke up with me. I respect her choice, but I still love her. She said at first that she wanted to remain friends, but grew angrier over these old things each time we talked. Now we don't talk at all.

She's in a very difficult situation right now, legally and financially - visa issues. Since graduating, she is being denied permission to work. She has not asked for my help - specifically rejected an offer of financial aid the last time we spoke. What I can do that she cannot is talk to an attorney about her situation. Just questioning now if I should.

Apologies if this isn't terribly coherent. I haven't had a proper night's sleep since the break-up.
Say you have an ex in a difficult situation. Things ended badly, but you're the only one who can possibly help them. Would you?
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