Should certain food products be banned from schools if students have allergies?

When I was in Primary/Elementary school they banned peanut butter completely because a few kids had allergies to it. With this premise in mind do you think its fair or reasonable for the school to ban certain foods or should the kids be responsible for managing their allergy?

your thoughts on this?
detailed and thorough replies are appreciated
Updates:
please note, im taking about HOME-MADE LUNCHES being brought to school, not stuff prepared at school cafeteria.

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Most Helpful Girl

  • At primary schools I think it's fair for severe allergies.
    Children should still be responsible, taught not to share food, wash their hands after everything and to carry an epi pen but at that age accidents happen. Kids are all playing, have grubby hands and very little idea of personal space.
    All it takes is being partnered up with a kid who had peanut butter at lunch for something to smear across and anaphylaxis is sudden. Why risk it? Should one kids right to peanut butter in a 6 hour window override another kids right to life?

    High school is different, they're more conscious of how cross contamination can occur and can choose to be in other areas if they know someone in particular brings things they're allergic to so I think more leeway would be appropriate

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Most Helpful Guy

  • I think that's still the protocol today. It makes sense. It wouldn't be fair if Timmy couldn't have peanut butter, but everyone else could because he's allergic to it. Might as well NOT bring in anything if one or two kids can't also have it. Bring in something EVERYONE can have.

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What Girls Said 22

  • I think it's reasonable (in a way). It's easier to play it safe under those circumstances.

    I think with primary school it's probably a good idea to ban it. The kids don't know any better in those situations.

    In elementary I think the school should be more lenient.

    It is unfair to restrict those kids who don't have allergies away from the food they might really enjoy. But they have the option to enjoy it after school

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  • Yes, If a child has been diagnosed with a severe allergy which could cause an anaphylactic shock , or any other life-threatening reaction then ALL kids should be banned from bringing that food product onto the school premises. It is selfish not to.

    No mater how careful or responsible children are, or how educated they are about food allergies and cross-contamination etc , the risk will always be there. Children , no matter what age they are , can't be alert at all times , and may accidentally forget to discard of packaging appropriately and correctly , or they may accidentally transfer the food onto a table or chair etc.

    If a child at my kids school had an allergic reaction to a certain food, there's noway i would let my child take that product into school. There's a limitless variety of other foods that can be put in a packed lunch , so i wouldn't be selfish and pig-headed by giving my kid peanut butter sandwiches in her packed lunch when another kid's life could be put at risk. She can eat peanut butter sandwiches when she gets home

    People who have severe peanut allergies can go into an anaphylactic
    shock just by someone opening a packet of peanuts as the following article proved

    www.dailymail.co.uk/.../Nut-allergy-girl-went-anaphylactic-shock-plane-passenger-ig

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  • The child should be aware of what they're allergic to and have medication on them if it's severe. The staff should be well aware of it as well but it's too much to ask the parents, whom many are very particular with their child's diet, to restrict what they give their kid to take to school.

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  • Something common, like a peanut allergy (and keeping in mind that peanut butter is a common lunch item for kids who are not allergic), I definitely think should be banned in schools. I can't really think of any other food allergies that are fatal just by touching it.

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  • Well it's not fair on children who don't have allergies.

    Some children have allergies to bread, pepper, milk. Should we stop providing these foods too?

    I am sure someone out there has allergy to every rice or bean product.

    It's just not fair.

    These children with allergies should have a separate dining area and should bring pack lunches.

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  • I think it depends on the severity of the allergy.

    If we banned everything people 'could' be allergic too, there would be barely any options to bring into school. That would mean no citrus fruits, no berries, no bread, no pasta, no peanuts etc. it would get ridiculous.

    If the allergy could kill someone then I could understand banning it but if it can't then I think it is the job of the kid to eat by themselves

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  • It makes sense... because there is cross contamination of all foods for the most part in the kitchen... so it's hard to keep things kosher...

    Only if they hired a specific new person to take care of only those kids with allergies... which no country has money for.

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  • I think they should. If a child can only get sick from eating the food they are allergic to then safety measures should be made so that the kid doesn't eat any of it from other kids.
    What the other commenters fail to remember is there are kids who can have a severe reaction just by smelling the food, like peanuts. If the food allergy is that high risk then yes, it should be banned. Not the things like "I'm vegan no meat" or "I can't eat gluten".

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  • No. My mum is a school cook and she has a list of all the children that have allergies and ensures they eat correctly. Obviously for home made lunches they're some requirements, like no peanuts.

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  • We don't want kids to die... but restrictions pb&j isn't cool either... segregation is probably the answer.

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  • Kids share food. Sometimes they share a chocolate bar without realising it has nuts in it, their nut allergic friend forgets to check and bam. he's having a seizure.

    So yes they should be.

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  • When in elementary school and middle school so grades primary-7 yes it should be banned because kids aren't old enough to properly manage it. After that it shouldn't be. My highschool didn't ban it.

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  • They probably still have a liability even if it's a lunch made by someone else. They can't risk kids feeding someone those things by accident. Just legal stuff and covering their asses.

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  • Kids should be responsible for managing their allergies. Why should everyone else have to suffer because a handful of kids have an allergy? The school can keep those products in a separate area and serve in a particular if that what needs to happen but to ban it... that's ridiculous.

    Same does for restaurants. And airplanes. Like now when buying tickets online they ask if you have peanut allergies. If anyone on the flight says yes. They don't even serve peanuts on the plane period. That's just stupid to me. Make them ride with the luggage. Lol kidding but seriously... they should not ban certain products from schools.

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    • To your update: definitely not. That's crazy. If it's that big of a problem for schools, the child with allergies still should manage their allergies. I guess the school can do something crazy like provide a sheet of stickers at the beginning of the year and have them out a peanut sticker or shell fish sticker on their lunch box or bag or a certain color ribbon to advise certain foods in their lunch. Even that seems a bit farfetched but I don't feel that certain foods should be banned.

  • I don't think so. People need to take responsibilty for themselves. I don't think it would be right to restrict everyone on account of one or two kids.

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    • No not for elementary schools kids they aren't responsible. Once you hit middle school and high school there shouldn't be bans because you are old enough to understand and be responsible.

  • its not fair, the parent of the kiddo should be responible for his/her allergy

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  • It's absolutely fair that nuts aren't allowed in school, but only in elementary school. So up to grade 6 or so. After that, children are old enough to understand their allergy, know the consequences of consuming or touching the allergen, and they know how to manage it.

    I have a severe peanut allergy, and while I always knew I couldn't eat nuts, I didn't have a firm grasp on the severity until I was about 9 or 10. When I got to that point, I just avoided things that had nuts or had potentially come into contact with them. I still manage it that way to this day, and I carry a couple of EpiPens everywhere I go just in case. My house will always be a peanut free zone, but I don't expect that of high schools and public places.

    To me, it's about the health and safety of young children with nut allergies. It's easier to eliminate the problem rather than have them try to avoid it. In high school, it's different because teens know better.

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  • I think listing out ingredients in that specific food item would be more helpful.

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  • That's why there's a special table set aside for those kids.

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  • Yes I feel like this is a great safety precaution. This ends anything accidently happening

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  • If it is known that a student has a severe allergy to something, then I think that particular food should be banned. Better safe than sorry.

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  • when they are small, away from parents and legally obliged to be there children deserve to be protected. allergy can cause death in some people. school is like 6 or 8 hours you can eat your freakin pb sandwich later jeeeeez

    u have to balance the potentially serious risk of death vs craving pb sandwich. some people r real d1cks.. smh

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What Guys Said 26

  • The underlying policy decision is whether a minority of students who have exceptional needs should expect the school to make changes that affect everyone just so the minority can be accommodated, or should the minority be expected to make their own accommodations.

    Some students are vegetarians and are offended by watching others eat meat. Should meat be banned from the cafeteria? Some students are lactose intolerant, so should we ban milk?

    These solutions assume that the majority should always accommodate the interest of minorities, especially if the minority need arises from some condition that is immutable, such as an allergy. This assumption seems to never be questioned and I believe the answer lies in political strategy. In the US, there is one political party which attempts to survive by making itself attractive to every possible identified minority. If you make the majority accommodate the minority, of course that minority will be beholden to whoever exercised that power on their behalf. In this way, members of the majority feel that their rights are ignored and that is the basic problem that resulted in the election of Mr. Trump.

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    • How did you make it to 62?

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    • @musicbrain5 Exactly! Allergies can be extremely difficult to manage so the "just avoid it" advice isn't as easy as so many people seem to think. :/

    • @xHoneyxBeex I absolutely agree. It's really impossible to know anything about this until you've lived with it - either with yourself or by having a child with these allergies. There seems to be a lot of people here who understand this, thankfully. Crickets from the OP here, though.

  • Well no, if it's homemade, it's obviously the responsibility of the students (and parents) to make sure there's no dangerous substance in the food. Some people may say that homemade food can be a problem when students begin to share food but I believe that kids as young as 7 can understand and manage their allergy if their parents make clear to them how important it is. Also, little children usually hang out with the same few kids, so it also lies within the responsibility of the parents to take their son's/daughter's best friends aside and tell them to not offer little Tommy or little Sarah anything that contains nuts (for instance).

    In the case of school-prepared food, I think it all depends on the age. For elementary school, it probably makes sense to take certain food products off the menu list (not as individual foods but as ingredients in prepared meals). For high schoolers, I believe it is enough to hang up a menu plan for the day where all the potential allergy dangers are listed. For example it would say something like "This meals must be avoided by students with xy-allergy". From what I know, most school cafeterias usually prepare more than one dish, so it wouldn't be a big deal for the allergic students to choose something else.

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    • I believe very strongly in teaching children self-responsibility and independence at an early age, which is why I have the above opinion.

  • It is not a bad idea to try that. I am not sure if schools will be willing to take up that responsibility of keeping in mind the allergies of students while drafting the canteen menu.

    Mostly the student should take care not to eat those food products they are allergic to.

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  • I think kids should be taught some responsibility and respect for their peers.

    But that schools should act fairly.
    If the argument that peanut butter can't be taken to school because some alergic kid might smell it - why are kids allowed to come to school with clothes doused in cigarette smoke? that causes problems for many. Why are perfumed deodorants allowed?

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  • Only for Elementary school and preschools, and maybe middle school. By high school it should be the student's responsibility to avoid foods they can't have. You can't expect the world to not serve foods just because you're allergic.

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  • I think it is reasonable to have certain classrooms or lunch tables designated as peanut-free. To completely ban peanuts from the entire school is excessive.

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  • Everyone wants everyone else to be controlled to suit the weakest link. FAIL

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  • So you'd ban all gluten, dairy, meat, seafood, certain veg and fruits? (People can have allergies to all of them) Because that's a pretty bland lunch then. The parents are responsible. If your child has an allergy it's your responsibility to make sure they're not taking other peoples lunches and almost killing themselves.

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  • I have nut allergies but they're not too severe. In my opinion, it should be left up to the school. This isn't nearly as severe a proposition as school uniforms. To ensure the livelihood of a few to the "detriment" of the many

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  • How do these kids function when they go out in public or to a restaurant?

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  • they did the same in my school. they banned any and all peanut products. i think it's a reasonable step to insure health and safety of students

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  • You don't have options in your schools or something?

    If you're allergic to something (or in case if one's terrorist religion doesn't allow to eat something), just order something else.

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  • When I went to a school where they served food we without any allergies ate the regular food that were served and they who had allergies ate allergy friendly food that were served separated from the regular one. There were no problems and both parts were happy.

    In the schools I went to where we had to bring our own food with us we ate what we had with us. People with allergies had allergy friendly food and everyone else ate what we wanted to without putting the allergic in danger.

    Since it worked very well I thinks a ban is unnecessary. Yes, I'm talking about all schools I went to. Both elementary, middle and high school.

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  • Would make sense but your punishing the other kids, best way to remedy this is find which students have what allergies, and split the lunch period accordingly

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  • Maybe in elementary school but I mean after that kids should be old enough to understand their allergy's and what they should and shouldn't eat.

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  • No. The parents should be making sure that the allergens dont enter their childs lunch and that the child knows what he/she can and can't have.

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    • How can they be sure of that, especially if the child is very young? Are they supposed to hover over their child at lunch and recess to make sure some other kids PB&J sandwich doesn't touch their lunch, or that they don't trade for a peanut butter cookie? Five and six year olds don't yet understand the consequences of their allergies. It's a different story when they get to junior high.

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    • I doubt that many parents of non-allergic children would want to be liable for any incidents. Neither do the schools. This is why prevention is so important, and the only way to ensure it is to enforce restrictions. There are plenty of other things to eat besides nuts for lunch.

    • I agree they won't understand cross contamination and the like but thats why you make sure they dont trade food at all. Tell them about their allergy and that thats why you dont trade foods.

      People seem to forget that back in the day allergies were still in schools and so were the allergens. There was no ban and kids still lived, for the most part, to deal with their allergies later in life. The ban is a good idea, there is no denying that, but not a necessary one. I think people are just overreacting and being lazy parents by not informing their children of the dangers of sharing and trading.

  • Don't like it - don't eat it.

    It was always my rule to live by.

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  • I don't think so. Just cause one person can't eat it, doesn't mean another cannot.

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  • The kids should be responsible for managing their allergy

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  • It's generally the class that it's banned from, not the school. With that said, any retard that thinks elementary kids are responsible enough to manage their own food or kids with said allergies are savvy enough to avoid kids with foods that they're allergic to have never been around kids and/or probably shouldn't be parents... which isn't surprising cause mist people on here are idiots, regardless. Not just because of proximity that can cause reactions from touch or smell that can cause shock, but because kids don't wash their hands and can easily contaminate everything around them. That's why colds and shit spreads so easily in elementary school.

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  • No because allergies can be a problem anywhere. Just don't touch someone else's food.

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  • No. Because youd end up banning everything

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  • Yeah

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  • Yes it's reasonable

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  • We didn't even have food at our school.

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  • Nope

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