Would you eat meat grown in a lab?


  • Yes
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  • No
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Most Helpful Girls

  • No. I’m vegetarian already and don’t really miss most meat. The only thing I ever miss is seafood. But I’m also kind of a health nut. I don’t eat anything artificial.

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    • Funny how different people are. I never liked seafood so I don't eat it

    • @Seppelson I loved clam chowder and calamari. I also liked lobster, but I never ate it, because I was never able to get over the guilt with that. They boil them alive. Also, I have always been disturbed by the way they're treated in grocery stores. I also really missed sushi for a time, although I've recently discovered how to make vegetarian sushi. I'm from the coast. That probably contributes to seafood thing. They have seafood in landlocked areas, but I don't think it's nearly as good. It's not as fresh, and it's not as big a part of the culture, so people don't really know as much about how to make it as they do near the coast.

Most Helpful Guys

  • Yes. I mean I'm a supporter for this research. It could be a major step into an eco friendly Earth.

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    • I think most people fear about this food stems from a naturalistic fallacy. I'm gonna come out and say this: Just because something is natural, that does not mean it directly implies it is good. Similarly, just because something is unnatural, doesn't directly imply it is bad.

      I mean the meat we eat right has to be raised by animals that has to consume antibiotic. This in turn would lead to microbe gaining resistance to antibiotics. And one might argue virtually none of our food are natural in the first place since we selectively bred traits.

  • If it tastes good and costs the same, sure.

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    • It's gone from 325,000$ in 2013 to 11$ per pound (As of April), with price point to produce still being lowered thanks to big investments from large meat companies such as Tyson food.

      But getting it ready for mass commercial distribution is a ways off.

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    • Yea it's gonna be a while.

      Also wow, meat here is 4.89 USD for ground 90% lean hamburger.

    • Well this meat is from CashSaver and it's chicken. So there's a bit of difference I'm sure.

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Have an opinion?

What Girls Said 9

  • I'm a vegetarian, have been for years. I legit don't remember the taste of meat, and I'm not sure I'd be comfortable eating it, even if its not from an animal. I think it'd be a crazy weird sensation and it might have a negative impact. Not sure though... I'd be willing to try other lab grown foods but not meat.

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  • I typically don’t eat meat unless it’s necessary (Ex: at a friend’s/extended family’s house, etc and that’s what is served—don’t want to be rude, you know?) so... it’s unlikely I would unless I did unknowingly.

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  • Certain scenes from Ghostbusters and Poltergeist pop into my terrified mind.

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  • Yes. Gladly. If I had to kill for my meat I would be vegetarian

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  • If it’s safe then yeah

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    • Safety Pros:
      You don't have to introduce vaccines, antibiotics, and medicine to the animal.
      Stress hormones from confined spaces/conditions don't affect the animal.
      No cross-organ contamination from the feces of intestines, or the sepsis from the liver and kidneys.
      Using less genetically inbred animals, or selectively bred mutations that have defects for bigger portions.

      But I don't know what the exact method used on the meat is. What chemicals do they introduce? What environment do they use to stimulate cell reproduction?
      Skepticism is always good.

  • Nope

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  • NO, that does not seem right too me

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  • only if the animal itself went extinct

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  • No way

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What Guys Said 22

  • No. Not yet. I've read it tastes awful. Plus, $100,000 dollars for a hamburger seems kinda steep. I hope this technology works out in the end. It'd be nice if we could stop hurting and killing animals.

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    • It's gone from 325,000$ in 2013 to 11$ per pound (As of April), with price point to produce still being lowered thanks to big investments from large meat companies such as Tyson food. The taste issue has been largely fixed thanks to introducing fat cell production.

      But getting it ready for mass commercial distribution is a ways off.

    • Thats good news. Id read decades ago of the possibility. If it tastes good and the price is competitive, I'd definitely buy it.

  • It will stop slaughtering but will bring many health issues to the world

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    • Actually it may reduce health issues.

      The meat is grown without extra organs involved such as the heart, brain, liver and intestines. This means you don't have to introduce antibiotics, vaccinations and medicines into the animal. You can also grow meat from more natural animals breeds, instead of selectively bread animals which can have a host of health issues.

      It's a more cleanly made meat with fewer additives than the alternative.

  • No, I prefer real meat that comes from a real dead animal

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  • i'm willing to give it a try, if it taste good i might just buy them to eat instead, but if taste weird or funny to me, then i probably won't eat it again.

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  • If it tastes the same and it doesn't involved torturing a living animal on a production line I say go for it.

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  • Why not? If its cruelty free and has no averse health effects unique to the process its made in I’m fine with it.

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  • No. Animals should die for my meat. My religion requires the full cycle of life to take place.

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  • I'll be waiting a good while on that one.

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    • I think we all will.

      Mass commercial production and distribution is a ways off.

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    • Oh sorry, I didn't mean you. I meant people in general who have ignorance cause they're not learning anything about it. You don't seem ignorant. Sorry if it came off that way friend.

    • Oh, I see. My bad. 😊

  • No. It could lead to a situation in the future where I (or we) would depend on labs to get our food.

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  • If it was as tasty and harmless as the real meat, sure.
    After all I eat meat because I like the taste, the rest doesn't matter much.

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  • Yes. Lab grown meat will be a lot cleaner than the meat you have come out of these horrid factories today.

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  • Of course not. I dont even eat GMO poison, let alone shit like this.

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  • That’s bad for business

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  • created from plants and no GMO then yea.

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    • It wouldn't be meat if it was grown from plants.

      But they can use non-GMO, chemical free animals to produce the muscle and fat cells that make up the meat, which is a positive.

      Since normal animals are pumped full of antibiotics, muscle grown meat does not need those antibiotics and medicine because the grown muscle lacks the other organs that could be infected. Thus, no antiobiotics needed. Just a simulated environment that makes the muscle think it's still in a cow.

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    • Yea that's totally fair. Go for it.

    • Veggie burgers are pretty great too

  • As long as it's actual meat

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    • It is. It's muscle and fat tissue from different cuts of the animals body. It just grows thinking it's in a pig when it's really inside a pig-like biology environment.

    • Then yeah, why th not

  • Nah, Bulls do it fine.

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  • Not likely

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  • In a few years, we won't have a choice.

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  • Yes I would I think it's not changing anything

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  • After watching the video. It's a yes for me

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  • If you couldn't tell, then why not

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  • No that shit gives you cancer.

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