Do you agree with Safe Injection Sites & Alcohol Management Programs?

Do you agree with Safe Injection Sites & Alcohol Management Programs?
Here in Ottawa (Canada) we have several Safe Injection Sites (that provide clean needles and a safe site for drug users) and Alcohol Management Programs (which provides hourly doses of alcohol to alcoholics). These sites are based on a cost-saving, harm-reduction model, which aims at managing addiction rather than treating it. Do you agree with Safe Injection Sites and Alcohol Management Programs? Do you think your government should fund these programs? Why or why not?
  • Yes, I agree
    Vote A
  • No, I don't agree
    Vote B
  • Other
    Vote C
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46

Most Helpful Guy

  • I approve. Any approach that reduces harm is worthwhile.

    Portugal went even further.

    "On July 1, 2001, Portugal enacted a law to decriminalize all drugs. Under that law, nobody who is found possessing or using narcotics is arrested in Portugal, nor are they turned into a criminal. Indeed, neither drug use nor possession is considered a crime at all. Instead, those found doing it are sent to speak with a panel of drug counsellors and therapists, where they are offered treatment options.
    [...]
    "After more than 15 years, it’s clear which approach worked better. The United States drug policy failed spectacularly, with about as many Americans dying last year of overdoses — around 64,000 — as were killed in the Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq Wars combined.

    "In contrast, Portugal may be winning the war on drugs — by ending it. Today, the Health Ministry estimates that only about 25,000 Portuguese use heroin, down from 100,000 when the policy began.

    "The number of Portuguese dying from overdoses plunged more than 85 percent before rising a bit in the aftermath of the European economic crisis of recent years. Even so, Portugal’s drug mortality rate is the lowest in Western Europe — one-tenth the rate of Britain or Denmark — and about one-fiftieth the latest number for the U. S."

    theintercept.com/.../

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Most Helpful Girl

  • I think it's a step in the right direction. But it needs to be done right. In my city they recently put one in right near a school, and understandably, that did not go over well.

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Have an opinion?

What Guys Said 5

  • 12 steps worked for me and I've seen it work for much worse cases. I haven't seen any information on the effectiveness of programs like that. Some people take a long time to come around, and do a lot of damage along the way. But others have no desire to change, and I can't justify enabling hopeless addicts.

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  • It’s better than making them quit cold turkey and making them do something they wouldn’t normally do

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  • Say Hi to Randy the Cheese guy for me, I haven´t been to Ottawa since forever.

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  • Yes because people are going to do drugs regardless of the laws so better to make it safe for them

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  • They should treat it and get them off the drug

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    • Well, that is part of the argument of the harm-reduction model; drug and alcohol rehab/treatment is expensive and has high relapse rates.

What Girls Said 3

  • The expense alone makes me say no.

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  • I don't know. Seems like you're just enabling it?

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  • Agree

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