Paris is burning, thoughts/opinions?

So Paris is burning and it comes down to immigration and overtaxation. So I'm just curious on men/woman opinion on this topic.

Are you a?

Nationalist who believes in maintaining their culture/people.
Or
Globalist who wants all borders removed. Paris is burning, thoughts/opinions?
  • Globalist
    Vote A
  • Nationalist
    Vote B
Select age and gender to cast your vote:
I'm a GirlI'm a Guy

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Have an opinion?

What Girls Said 7

  • I am not European.

    And I do not want immigrants and refugees in my country.

    If a European person does not want to accept migrants into his country, I will totally understand him, moreover I would give zero fucks If he doesn't want immigrants from my country.

    Look, I am Turkish and I AM WARNING YOU, If those immigrants exceed 1/3 of yoyr population they will demand special rights.

    We are fighting with PKK terrorism for 40 years, because we were stupid and we let all these refugees in who were fleeing from Saddam.

    Nothing much changed today, we are the country with largest number of refugees (4 million officially recorded, 7 million estimated.) And their numbers are increasing rapidly. Since our policy is "Open borders for Syrians and Afghans"

    So we are already fucked, I think Europeans must save themselves.

    If I was an immigrant in Europe I would vote for alt-right because European left wing parties support terrorists in my country.

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  • This will happen to many more European countries, until it is just immigrants.

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  • It's why I'm not going out this weekend. It's dangerous outside.

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    • 5d

      How bad is it?

    • Show All
    • 5d

      Hmmm... you know, just go to the country side for the weekend. It's probably nicer there.

    • 5d

      Can't anyway. I'm too sick to go out

  • Oh my God!!! :O

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  • Turkish people need saw it is global

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  • The French are pissed at their government reducing their living standards

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  • Get rid of looting mooching immigrants and Paris might have a better chance recovering.

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What Guys Said 10

  • Not to understate this, but been there, done that. As one historian put it, the French have always had something of a reputation for being ungovernable. Five republics, three different royal families, and in 1789 a revolution of which Chou en-lai famously said, in 1974, that it was too soon to see what its impact might be.

    In that connection, it should not be forgotten that in 1968, the level of social upheaval in France reached such a pitch than no less a political titan than Charles DeGualle - the man who liberated France from the Nazi German (and Fascist Italian) yoke - was brought down. The French are, to say no more, unsentimental about their national leaders.

    Beyond those broad observations, a few other points can be made. First, France is subject to the same populist movement that is sweeping Europe and indeed the United States. Indeed, these protests seem to be coming especially out of France's small towns and rural areas - not unlike the support for President Trump in the U. S.

    Secondly, President Macron is politically weak in any case. His political party is barely 5 years old, his parliamentary supporters are generally not expert politicians - perish the thought! - and have made some amateurish mistakes and U-turns. This has made them much more susceptible to political pressure and this, in turn, tends to up the social temperature.

    Macron's political views do not have deep roots either in France's rural areas, nor in its cities. (Few countries are as culturally dominated by their capitals as is France by Paris.) The result is an unpopular President who won office almost by accident and has no natural base of support to fall back on.

    Macron is something of a classical liberal in the British tradition - free markets and the like. This in a country with no real tradition of classical liberal economics. So, again, he is implementing policies that, whatever their practical justifications, have no constituency.

    In that context, Macron's proposed fuel tax makes some economic sense - deficit reduction, carbon tax, reduced dependence on energy imports - but they are apt to have a disproportionate impact on France's rural regions where mass transit is not an option. Thus, the current protests.

    In terms of France's domestic politics, Macron has reached the limit of his political sway. He will have to proceed in incremental steps. In foreign policy, this is a weakening of French power within the EU. Add in a weak Germany. Rough seas to follow.

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  • Basically it's retarded. To complain about over taxation by costing the taxpayer a huge bill for emergency services attendance and damage to public property is just ass backwards. The peaceful protesters are always overtaken by the morons who just want to vent and loot.

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  • I'm from Belgium, the yellow vest movement has spread to here as well. Some protesters went to the European Parliament to protest against the EU. I support what the protesters do, but I do not support their violence. Macron is driving it too far.

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  • Why would anyone support Globalism?

    Globalists are those evil crony sudo capitalists, corporations, unaccountable and unellected leaders etc.. that NO ONE likes or wants to have power.

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  • The French and protesting. Nothing surprising, they love a good strike

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  • Whatever problems France have, they voted for it. Let them burn.

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  • is anyone suprised by this?
    yes im a nationalist. I've been a nationalist my whole life

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  • Good for them!

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  • Claude Frollo is back!

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  • oh this is getting very interesting... riots happening there, wonder if it will happen all over Europe next

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