If social distancing violates the freedom to peaceably assemble, do fire codes do that as well?

I've seen many people argue that the social distancing measures violate the freedom to peaceably assemble while proponents have countered using the analogy that "the freedom of speech doesn't allow you to yell 'fire' in a crowded theater". Well, I've seen conflicting reports about whether or not you'd face legal trouble for yelling "fire" in a crowded theater but said theaters (for a more direct analogy) also have fire codes. These fire codes LIMIT how many people can ASSEMBLE in the theater because of the public safety risk. Similarly, the social distancing laws restrict how many people can assemble in a given space because of the public safety risk posed by COVID-19. While the government can't prevent you from assembling for the sake of assembling, it can prevent you from doing so in a way that puts public safety in danger. A good comparison would be the "freedom of religion". This prevents the government from putting on restrictions on religious activities that would be otherwise legal for the sake of repressing that religion BUT it doesn't give you an excuse to violate the law to practice your religion (I know there are some rulings that indicated otherwise but no system is perfect).
If social distancing violates the freedom to peaceably assemble, do fire codes do that as well?
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