Norwegian Cuisine - 12 Dishes

In this My Take I'm going to share the typically Norwegian food with you. If you've been in Norway or tasted the food before, I would like to hear about your experience about it.

I've also written other My Takes about Norway and if you're interested, you can also read them. Other Norwegian related My Takes are about tourist destinations in Bergen, 10 reasons why I love my country Norway, 7 funny facts about Norway and Norwegian stereotypes. So in other words I've a series of My Takes about Norway.

Norwegian Cuisine - 12 Dishes

Norwegian vegetables.

1) Pinnekjøtt

Norwegian Cuisine - 12 Dishes


It's lamb or mutton meat often eaten with mashed rutabaga, sausage and potatoes. It's nowaday the traditional Christmas food in Norway.

2) Raspeballer/komle

Norwegian Cuisine - 12 Dishes


Raspeballer, also called komle is a type of potato dumplings. Often it's eaten together with regular potatoes, sausage and sometimes bacon. It's also common to have butter on the food.

3) Fiskeboller

Norwegian Cuisine - 12 Dishes


Fiskeboller, or fish balls which it's called in English, exist in many countries. But I'm talking about the Norwegian variant. Things eaten with it is potatoes, carrots and white sauce. Nowadays many Norwegians are also using curry or aromat on them.

4) Lutefisk

Norwegian Cuisine - 12 Dishes


Lutefisk is made from aged fish which is air-dried white fish or dried/salted whitefish which is called klippfisk and lye. It has a gelatinous texture on it and "lutefisk" directly translated to English is "lye fish". Often cod is used to this dish. It's served with potatoes and bacon. For many Norwegians this is the traditional Christmas dinner and some prefer this more than pinnekjøtt.

5) Smalahove

Norwegian Cuisine - 12 Dishes


Smalahove or sheep head is a traditional Western-Norwegian food. The brain is removed, the skin and the fleece of the head is torched. The head can be salted, dried or smoked. For preparation of the meal it takes ca. three hours to boil or steam it. It's usually served with mashed rutabaga and potatoes. In the past it was mostly poor who ate it, but nowadays it's considered a delicacy.

6) Matpakke & Brunost

Norwegian Cuisine - 12 Dishes

Traditional Norwegian lunch with brunost (brown cheese).


In Norway we've traditionally "matpakke" instead of warm lunch. "Matpakke" is lunch you brings with you at school or work. Schools usually don't provide warm food and there's only a few schools which serve warm lunch that you've to buy. The typically Norwegian "matpakke" consist of bread, butter and "pålegg"; something you put on your sliced bread like ham, cheese or jam for example. Brunost or brown cheese is a Norwegian food item that's common to put on sliced bread, small breads or waffles. It's also many Norwegians who eats sliced bread to breakfast as well.

7) Rømmegrøt

Norwegian Cuisine - 12 Dishes


Rømmegrøt or sour porridge is porridge made of sour cream, whole milk, wheat flour, butter and salt. It's traditionally eaten at Norway's national day 17. May and at the St. Hans celebration. It's often served with spekeskinke (smoked ham) and kringle (Nordic pretzle). It's very common to put butter, sugar and cinnamon on the porridge.

8 ) Fenalår

Norwegian Cuisine - 12 Dishes

Fenalår and asparagus.


Fenalår is dried, salted and cured lamb leg. Fenalår resemble spekeskinke. Both fenalår and spekeskinke can be eaten with potatoes in white sauce. A newer variant is combining it with asparagus. In English it would be called "lamb leg".

9) Kjøttkaker

Norwegian Cuisine - 12 Dishes


Kjøttkaker resembles kjøttboller (Meatballs) and is made of force meat. Often pig, cow and lamb meat is used. Kjøttkaker directly translated to English is "meat cakes" and it's served with potatoes in brown sauce. Often pea stew and lingonberry jam is eaten with it.

10) Fårikål

Norwegian Cuisine - 12 Dishes


Fårikål is a dish containg mutton and cabbage. It's boiled together in several hours in a cassarole with whole black pepper. This dish is also eaten with potatoes and carrots. It's eaten during the early autaumn when it's season for lambs. "Får i kål" or "Sau i kål" directly translated to English is "Sheep in cabbage".

11) Lapskaus

Norwegian Cuisine - 12 Dishes

Lapskaus with flatbrød (flat bread).


It's several countries that have this dish. The Norwegian variant consist of meat or sausage and vegetables like carrots, rutabaga, potatoes and celery. It also contains salt, pepper and broth.

12) Fish

Norwegian Cuisine - 12 Dishes

Salmon with asparagus, lemon and other vegetables.


It's common to eat fish in general speaking in Norway. It exists in several variants. It can be boiled or cooked on a fry pan. It can also be fresh, dried, lye, salted and smoked. We've salmon, brown trout, cod, Pollock, Atlantic mackerel, Atlantic herring and many more fish types. Fish is also usually served with potatoes and other vegetables.

#NorwegianDishes #Cuisine


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Most Helpful Girl

  • except for 5 and 6, i would try most of the food
    it's food i never tried before

    so a lot of it is more exotic to me than other cuisines which people in my country normally consider exotic like indian, middle eastern or thai.

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Most Helpful Guy

  • Haven't been to Norway. Most of these foods I haven't had the exact food, but I've had similar food. I've been to Sweden and finland... and a few things remind me of traditional U. K. food as well.

    The only Norwegian food I actually eat regularly is Jarlsberg

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Join the discussion

What Girls Said 7

  • Great take! But please share with some vegetarian dishes too, if possible?
    Because out of these I could only hope to try the second one someday. :P

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    • Thanks! : ) Norway isn't known for having so many vegetarian dishes. India is more known for vegetarian and vegan ones. It has something to do with traditions to do.

    • Yes! We have tons of vegetarian dishes. They're tasty. 😋 But non-vegetarian one's are also popular.

  • I've got a pack of Gudbrandsdalsost in the fridge at the moment :P I do prefer swedish messmör by Fjällbrynt (spread variant of brun ost). At mine we usually eat mesost on hard flatbread www.ica.se/.../hart-tunnbrod-714235.jpg
    And I just had some fiskbollar with dill a few days ago :P
    I gotta say though, that Smalahove looks like it came from a nightmare of mine... 😂😅

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  • I live in Norway so I've tasted all of them. My favourite is Pinnekjøtt and Fårikål.

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  • Some I like, most I don't... Norway has a weird taste palette for some reason... I mean it's weird to me, I'm sure it's not weird in general.

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  • Looks like we both eat fish a lot! Is it more of seawater fish or freshwater fish that Norwegians mostly eat?

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  • Similar to some swedish dishes too.
    Also why did you include fiskbollar? ; (

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    • They're also common to eat in Norway, therefor. "Fiskeboller, or fish balls which it's called in English, EXIST in many countries. But I'm talking about the Norwegian variant"

  • Norway you suck!!!

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What Guys Said 10

  • In what ways would you say is Norwegian food different from Swedish food? I know there are many similarities but I wonder if there are also differences.
    I'm curious because my wife and I are thinking about visiting either Sweden or Norway this winter. We haven't been to either country yet and we can't decide which one we want to go to ;-).

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  • #2 looks interesting.

    #4 ummm... Dried fish revived with water?

    #8 is that raw lamb?

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  • Now I remember why I ate at a lot of Italian restaurants while in Norway. And I usually make a point of eating the local food.

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    • Because you didn't like Norwegian food?

    • I did not. Scandinavian food in general I did not care for - and my grandfather was Swedish.

  • I'm vegetarian which means I'm going to die starving Norway 😵

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  • the only thing on here i would eat is the fish.

    i wouldn't go near any of that other stuff

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  • How does the sheep head taste like?
    Like normal salted dried meat?

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  • Fish is not Norweigan. New Zealanders probably eat more fish than the Norse.

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  • Interesting

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  • Norway here I come!!! 😋😋😋

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  • mkay

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