Europe's Most Influential Magazine Has Posted Fake News For Years

Famous German News Magazine, Der Spiegel, was busted spreading fake news when its most popular reporter Claas Relotius, (CNN's 2014 “Journalist of the year”) confessed he falsified and made up stories over many years.

Europe's Most Influential Magazine Has Posted Fake News For Years

Der Spiegel's famous journalist, awarded by CNN, has admitted that "he made up stories and distorted facts" in at least 7 out of 30 articles that appeared in its print and online editions, warning that other outlets could also be affected.

The other articles he wrote that were not outright fakes included invented facts and details that he completely made up.

Relotius resigned after admitting the fake news incident. He had written for the magazine for seven years and won numerous awards for his investigative journalism, including CNN Journalist of the Year in 2014 and the “European Press Prize” in 2017 .

 Claas Relotius holding his CNN's 2014 “Journalist of the year” award.
Claas Relotius holding his CNN's 2014 “Journalist of the year” award.

Earlier this month, he won Germany's "Reporterpreis" (Reporter of the Year) for his story about a young Syrian boy, which the jurors praised for its “lightness, poetry and relevance”. It has since emerged that all the sources for his reportage were at best hazy, and much of what he wrote was made up.

The falsification came to light after a colleague who worked with him on a story along the US-Mexican border raised suspicions about some of the details in Relotius’s reporting, having harboured doubts about him for some time.

Other deceptive fairytales included one about a Yemeni prisoner in Guantanamo Bay, and one about the American football star Colin Kaepernick.

Der Spiegel Headquarters in Hamburg.
Der Spiegel Headquarters in Hamburg.

Der Spiegel is a German weekly news magazine published in Hamburg. It has a weekly circulation of 840,000 copies, and is considered the largest such publication not only in Germany but in Europe.

It's considered to be is one of Europe's most influential magazines. It was founded in 1947 by John Seymour Chalonera and Rudolf Augstein, a former Nazi soldier who served in the Wehrmacht.

In the past Der Spiegel was notorious for hiring ex Nazis to write articles for magazine like former SS officers Paul Carell (who had also served as chief press spokesman for Nazi Germany's Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop) and Fritz Tobias


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Most Helpful Guys

  • Interesting mytake. Its unfortunate that fake news is produced. Such wrongdoings should not go unpunished. He has influenced public opinion according to his own whims, and not according to facts.

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  • Fake news is quite common apparently. A trick to catch the attention.
    It's been a hot topic in Europe 1 to 2 years back.

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Most Helpful Girls

  • Fake news happens around the world not surprised.

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  • Thats mad. It's a theme these days that it's more important to push an ideological political doctrine than to report the truth fairly and unbiasedly.

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What Guys Said 6

  • To be expected. Same thing happened in the Netherlands with 'de Volkskrant'. But the important thing is that they then retract all the stuff he did.

    The system isn't perfect, faults will happen

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  • Europe's Most Influential Magazine Has Posted Fake News For Years

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  • No surprise. Journalist used to report news. Now they fabricate it, mostly to push their Marxist agenda.

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  • Those who spread fake news to promote any agenda should get a not so fake noose around their neck.

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  • Reporters only tell half the truth and the other half is made up or someone opinion.

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  • Doesn't surprise me

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What Girls Said 3

  • He doesn't look very trustworthy.

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  • Good take

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  • The Swedish government is fucking unbelievable

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