Books I highly recommend

War Child by Emmanuel Jal

Books I highly recommendWar Child is the autobiography of Emmanual Jal and details his journey from Sudanese refugee to international rapper. From the outset, we know the beginning and the end of the story as it is outlined in the first chapter.This book was extremely moving, very inspiring, and very graphic. There were times where I would just stop reading for a little while because it was so graphic yet it must be read because his story should never go silent. This book is like a hard slap to the face and makes you count your blessings.

A Thousand Splendid Suns By Khaled Hosseini

If you honestly believe all Muslims are bad you need to read this book. This book expands over thirty years from Soviet invasion to the overthrow of the Taliban. It follows two different women, Mariam and Laila and how their stories intertwine. It is heartbreakingly beautiful and will open your eyes to the tragedy happening in the Middle East. It made me cry three different times and there will be parts that will fill you with horror.

Looking for Alaska by John Green

Green's debut YA novel follows a year in the life of high school junior Miles Halter, a friendless Floridian who begged his parents to enroll him in the Culver Creek boarding school. This is an outstanding coming-of-age novel that has already proved to be a favorite teen read. It doesn't resort to a cop out of a "happily ever after" ending, but the characters each seek closure on their own terms. The characters are well-drawn, witty, and full of individual quirk. After I finished it still haunted me and I could not stop asking what if? I will shut up before I give too much away.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Very well made book, a classic actually. Set on the east coast in the 1920's, from this book we learn that sometimes wanting something is better than having it. It perfectly captures America's hopes and dreams to strive for the unattainable. It has been 90 years since it was published, and still the story resonates with readers. Fitzgerald makes a scene sounds poetic and has amazing word choice. Combined, these towo made an awesome read.

The Perks of being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

This is a beautiful and painful story about a 15 year old boy, Charlie, moving through his freshmen year of highschool. When I finished The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chybosky, I sat there in a stunned silence. The book is written in letter form to an unknown friend. The book was strongly powerful in a manner that diary or letter style books rarely achieve.

I am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai

Amazing story from a remarkable young woman. The Swat valley does sound beautiful thanks to the wonderful mental pictures I got from the very vivid text. It really is ashame that this area is no longer available for tourist, be they Pakistani or international. The story of how Malala's Swat Valley was taken over by Taliban extremists, how she and her whole family had to live under the de facto rule of terrorists, was chilling. In the book we get to know her idealistic father and, a figure little written about in the news, her remarkable mother--a brave woman, religiously devout, unable to read, who lived her whole life up until recently in purdah.

Misery by Stephen King

This book will haunt your days and nights. Paul Sheldon is a popular writer celebrating the completion of a new book, when his car goes off a mountain road in a snowstorm. He finds himself with shattered legs, being held captive by a former nurse, Annie Wilkes. Ironically, Wilkes just happens to be his number one fan. While she's nursing him back from near death, Wilkes reads his latest book, where he kills off his popular character, Misery Chastain (a sappy, high-drama character whom Sheldon has come to loathe). She decides that Sheldon will write a new novel (just for her), in which he brings Misery back from the dead.

The Opposite of Loneliness by Marina Keegan

The Opposite of Loneliness is collection of essays and short stories written by Marina Keegan, a tragically deceased young person who has gone too soon from this world. In front of Marina was certainly a great career after she graduated from Yale, supposed to start working at the New Yorker while one of her texts planned to be turned into a play. Unfortunately, the death was quicker but what is left as her legacy was collected in this interesting collection ‘The Opposite of Loneliness’ which certainly confirms that she was a talented young person who needed only to be provided with the right opportunity.

The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien

This book was excellent. Story line is amazing. Would recommend this book to all who love adventure and fantasy. The Hobbit is about the adventures of a hobbit, Bilbo Baggins, with dwarves and a wizard. Their adventure is to go to the mountain where the dragon, Smaug, is protecting all of his valuable. The dwarves and Bilbo are led by Thorin to get his loot back from the dragon.They encounter many difficulties on their trip. There are many issues the dwarves face in their adventure so it keeps the story flowing. There are a few plot twists also.

Quiet: The power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking by Susan Cain

This is hardly an impartial review. As somebody who has been called at some point or another the has been called "shy" (which I don't object) to "anti-social" (which I most certainly consider unfair), I found in Susan Cain's "Quiet," the validation and appreciation many introverts have been searching for. In "Quiet," Ms. Cain explains the rise of the Extrovert Ideal in the 1920s and how it is that today we associate talkative, risk-taking, and action-oriented people with intelligence, beauty, power and success. This book gives excellent advice and a sense of hope to those who are introverted in a world where load and sometimes obnoxious behavior is given a higher value.

13 Reasons Why by Jay Asher

This super quick read revolves around recordings from a high school girl who has committed suicide. My initial thought was that this might be a really depressing read; which is not what I was looking for. Although, the concept of the story was sad; the story was more poignant and beautifully constructed than anything else. If you are anything like me, Hannah Baker’s story will draw you in from the beginning and make it very difficult for you to put this book down. I still can’t stop thinking about this book. Hannah’s story really makes you think about how your every interaction can affect others.

Fault in our Stars by John Green

This is young adult fiction at its best. For me it was a quick read (i read it in about 5 consecutive hours) this book was very well written. It covers a topic that is avoided because its difficult to talk about. Hazel and Augustus are two of the most fleshed-out characters, particularly teenagers, that I have ever read. Their story is a joy and a privilege to read. Furthermore, their love is more real than anything else you will ever find on the Young Adult shelves.

Read it alone if you can people give you weird looks if you laugh and then cry/tear up ten pages later.

This Star won't Go Out by Eshter Earl along with Wayne and Lori Earl

This one of the books I am reading right now. But it is so incredibly well written that i will put it on this list. I have no idea how to review this book. Yes its sad but it also has love and joy. The book is a compilation of journal entries, posts, letters, pictures etc. from Esther, her friends and family as she deals with both living and dying from cancer. I was struck by how much love and admiration this young girl inspired in those around her. I think it is an amazing tribute that her family went on to make this book happen. And I love the idea that everyone who reads this book will contribute to Esther's wish to be an author 'someday'. It has a lovely intro by John Green. Esther was very involved on the internet. Even though her physical world became somewhat limited due to her illness, she managed to expand virtually where she could not physically. She garnered a large and close-knit community of friends and support through the internet. Plus she is a nerdfighter which is just awesome.

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America by Erik Larson

This book goes back and forth between the antaganist, Holmes who was the first known serial killer in the United States and the protagonist, Daniel Burnham. Daniel Burnham was the architect that designed Union Station and The Flatiron Building right now he is trying to makes a name for himself by designing the World Fair. Meanwhile, Holmes is using the fair to lure more victims. Holmes truly had the devil inside his mind he even said so himself. He killed women he had seduced the day before, business partners he had no use for, children, and other people he killed just because he felt like it. In the early 1890's he built what is called a murder castle. This murder castle has a labryinth of rooms, secret passages, false doors, stairways to nowhere, and many traps. He killed as many as 200 people in the murder castle. The book virtues far outweigh its shortcomings and I have no problem in recommending THE DEVIL IN THE WHITE CITY to anyone interested in US History, Chicago Architecture, or just a well told story.

The Harry Potter Book series

I saved the best for last. Harry Potter is my favorite book series ever. You had to have seen this coming my name is ginnyweasley97. First I think the Harry Potter series are much more than a fifth grade reading level book. Because they are fifth grade reading level, that provides an easy, quick read and you dont have to constantly be looking up words. Seriously they are an easy read. I started reading the series later than most. I ended up reading the entire series in 21 days. When was the last time you read a book and instantly wanted to pick it up and read it again? It doesn't happen often. I can't even begin to tell you how incredible these books are. Not only are they very entertaining, but they are filled with the important themes of good vs. evil, the power of love, and the value of good choices. The characters in this book have become part of my life. If you are at all hesitant to read this series because of its classification as a 'fantasy' series, I can assure you that you will not be disappointed. Yes, the book is about wizards and magic, but you would be shocked at how quickly the story pulls you in.

Happy reading!

Ginnyweasley97 is a GirlsAskGuys Editor
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What Guys Said 8

  • def read quite a few of these--Devil in the White City has one hell of a narrator on audible. One of my fave narrators for books set in fictitious old america. I think his name is christopher something

  • Thanks for suggestions!
    The great gatsby and the hobbig are great books

  • Great list! and congrats on getting editor too! We both got chosen the same time which is awkward lol. I really want to read "The Great Gatsby" and the rest of the Harry Potter series which I finished at Goblet of Fire, but that was like 10 years ago. So I kinda want to reread the whole series because after a long time I don't remember things as well. You for sure should get that library job! If they don't offer it to you then tough luck to them. Keep up the good work my friend!

  • thanks. its refreshing to see someone reads something other than teenage girl twilight copies books.

  • The Children of The Matrix is another masterpeice!
    by the way the take is good!

  • I didn't think that people needed The Hobbit explained to them :P

  • One of my favorite books. I liked the last chapter the most. I can really recommand it.

    all from Dostojewski is also a great read.

  • Thank you. I need to get back to the Everest known as my book collection :)


What Girls Said 3

  • Great list, I have read some of these, but now am curious to read the rest. Also, the last picture you have there with the quote about too much reality really resonates with me.

  • I like The Hobbit, Harry Potter series and Misery :D

  • Love this! Always looking for good reads. Thanks!