Do you feel like a foreigner in your own country?

I've heard some people saying they feels like they're foreigners in their own country because of the high amount of immigrants and refugees settling in their country. So I asks because I'm curious on how many feels like that on GAG.

I don't feel like a foreigner since the majority I meets are Norwegian like myself. But I've noticed there's more immigrants and refugees plus more new languages, cultures etc. It's a lot more common now than for some years ago. My country that had a mono-culture is leaning more to multiculturalism and I don't need to go far to see foreigners. If I walks five minutes outside my house I sees one.
A citizen and immigrants.

#ForeignerInOwnCountry #Multiculturalism #Immigrants


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What Girls Said 52

  • According to the "perpetual foreigner" stereotype, Asian-Americans are often branded as "foreign," regardless of the amount of the time on one's native soil. To make matters worse, some Asian-Americans may have ancestors who moved to the United States earlier than some European-Americans, but because of their physical appearance, they are deemed as "foreign". The underlying assumption is that America is a white person's country.

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    • Well said. I agree totally.

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    • That's absolutely true but i think it is also depends on the individual. Most Asians are shy compare to other race. There are many factors come in to play when talking about taking executive position which is another story.

    • 7d

      I could be because of the fact that eastern Asian cultures are mostly xenophobic (I love it, the don't have muslims to ruin their country), which will lead to Asians marrying Asians.

  • I only ever kinda felt this way after moving to my current city where there is a high amount of immigration. It doesn't bother me but there are a few crowds that I sorta stick out in.

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  • I don't think people are saying that because of immigration per se. I think people are saying that about immigrants that want to bring a culture drastically different from the one of their host country. And let's face it the most prominent example of our time are immigrants from muslim countries into the west

    And no I don't feel like that but I see how it concerns people.

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  • The fact that Nazis and the KKK are still around makes my country look unrecognizable, not the immigrants.

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  • Not at all. In most countries, the "original" inhabitants are still the largest group. Only exceptions are places like the USA, where the europeans are the majority while the native americans have become a discriminized minority. Same for australia.

    "Original" is still between " " because if you look back far enough, homo sapiens all came from africa and a bit more recent but still prehistorical, homo sapiens pushed out the neanderthals in Europe until they went extinct. Lots of moves have happened prehistorically, to the point where nobody is really "native" to the place they live in. So for practicality I focussed on the past 500 years only.

    Where do you draw the line? Are second generation immigrants still immigrants? What about 3rd gen? 4th? Or is anyone automatically a foreigner if their skin colour or religion differs from yours, even if their family has lived in the same country for over 50 years and they were born there too?

    One last thing to think about: my neighbors got their son on a holiday in germany. Now the boy has 2 passports, just because he could and because they thought it would be nice for him to have that. They were there for a few weeks and he doesn't even speak german. Is he an immigrant in his parents' country?

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  • All the time. Because I am white and live in South Africa we are told all the time by some black people we are not welcome and must go back to our European countries. We have been around since the 16th century in SA but yet we are apparently foreigners who must go if we are not happy with how things are. I would GLADLY go but unfortunately I don't think European countries will buy the story of me saying I am supposed to live there and am a national citizen. So basically, I belong nowhere.

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  • No, I don't. Canada has always been a nation of immigrants, ever since the days of New World colonialism. Everyone here who is not Native American is technically a foreigner. Most of my family was not born here in Canada, but they feel at home in this country and are grateful for the numerous opportunities that were available to them here.

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    • what country did they immigrant to?

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    • 6d

      again you haven't refuted any of my points yet you consider to me to be wrong and if you we're so considerate why don't you stop responding to me

    • 6d

      and you're absolutely right I pointed out how your country is not a country of immigrants but rather of settlers using the words that you specifically used. you can't arbitrarily change the meaning of words when you want them to to mean different things

  • I'm seen as a foreigner in my country not because of high amount of immigrants, I'm a foreigner because 1. I don't look Swedish 2. I seem to give off an incredibly un-swedish vibe, meanwhile my mum who is supposed to look far more foreign than me isn't treated or seen as such 3. My accent is very difficult to work out because it's such a mix of things. 4. My fashion isn't very Swedish...

    (What I mean by seen as a foreigner is that they speak English to me rather than Swedish, meanwhile they speak Swedish to the rest in my family right away)

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    • 7d

      Same, I look completely different than the stereotypical Dutch person and a bit like you said, give off an un-dutch vibe

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    • 7d

      wrong thread by me, sorry

    • 7d

      @tartaarsaus, I got a bit confused by that comment. So good to know why you wrote that.

  • I actually think about this all the time. I definitely feel like a foreigner in my own country. I live in a city thats actually referred to as little india because there are so many indians here. I may not see another white person the whole day here. It makes me really uncomfortable and I know I stand out like a sore thumb because of all the stares I get. I don't mind immigrants, but I hate this.

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    • 7d

      Which country do you live in and why do not seeing a white person matter?

    • 7d

      I live in the US. It bothers me because nothing is familiar. No one looks or acts like me and their way of life is just totally different then what Im used to. I don't have a problem with Indians being here, but people like to be with similar people.

  • I've immigrated. And where I live currently has many other immigrants. Never really thought of it that way.

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  • That's the problem with mass immigration, majority of them are not about integration. They suck the life emotionally and mentally out of those rich resourceful countries.

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    • They bring in their stupid primitive practices like genital mutilations.

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    • Not every immigrants and refugees are like that, but some are and it's a good thing to questioning their culture. Some also wants to covering themselves with veil and is skeptical to gender equality.

    • Money suckers

  • Multiculturalism is a disguise to bring muslims in. Guess what when they reach 2% the country will start rapidly becoming monocultural again. And the only culture to dominate all will be islam

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    • What I'm worried about is my country is losing the Western values like equality between genders, sexuality etc. and I wants to keep the democracy system we've now. I also would like to keep some Norwegian culture. So I'm skeptical to some things I admits. But I'm fine with people believing in God regardless if they're Christian, Muslim, Jew etc. I just don't want a conservative culture.

      Do you feel a foreigner in your country?

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    • 7d

      Megalyssa In the "before Christ era" the Quran didn't exist yet, nor did Islam, not even Christianity.

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      Whatever. Kuran must be edited by the way. With all the hate speech removed from it. I guess I will take on this big project

  • No, I've never felt that way.

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  • No.
    There are more immigrants, sure. I've never felt like being hospitable would need to involve completely abandoning my own culture+beliefs to conform to their own. So no. I don't feel like a foreigner.

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  • I was myself a foreigner in Saudi Arabia and that's where i was born and raised so obviously i felt like a foreigner because I'm not Saudi and Also because there are more immigrants living in saudi Arabia than there are Saudis.

    Anyway, the women in the photo you put are not immigrants, they look like white women converts to Islam.

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    • There are a lot of white muslim countries; several former soviet republics, Bosnia, Turkey, etc.

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    • @ zagor, Bosnia? where they had ethnic cleansing in the 90's? okay.. OH by the way, my unit was there.

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      @anoddtod I was in Bosnia in the sixties. Except for all the gun toting and pivo consuming people it was civilized.
      Then in the eighties some western governments thought it was a good idea to break up Yugoslavia and the big problems started. Old WW2 hates surfaced again and Yugoslavia became a powderkeg.

  • When they wear binbags and pray at the side of the road I often wonder which country I am in... oh forgot the UK silly me the land of plenty

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    • 6d

      We've some in Norway too.

    • 6d

      Norway thankfully isn't in the EU so ain't gettin dictated by the Germans we Brits may have to come live amongst you if it continues

    • 6d

      Norway have immigrants and refugees too although we're not part of EU. If I walks 5 minutes outside my home I sees many foreigners.

  • I love living in a big city that has people of all different backgrounds. And it's awesome that we have enough jobs & opportunities that draw people from other countries to live in our area.

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  • Yes. My country is 90% Muslim and I'm not. I'm a religious and ethnic minority. I fucking hate my country

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  • Not really, i have had people from other countries literally watch me out their window when i was a kid for some reason. and whenever I tried to make friends with their kids they'd call them inside and they'd all watch me play on my scooter around the little circle in our neighborhood until i left.

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  • yeah on my course there are way more foreigners than English many people coming for three years from Africa, China several European countries. I've been in a class of 20 where there was one other white person and about 4 English, everyone else is foreign.

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  • Not at all :) But I am surely way more open minded than most people in my country.

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    • I think the problem is that the foreigners at least the majority of them do not want to adapt to the culture and traditional values. Especially when it comes to religion.

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    • @iwillascend2 Ohh so you are fellow Caucasian, thought Kabardo-Balkarians were Muslims.


    • Yes we are. But I was not raised as one. My mother has been living in the udssr. Religion did not have any meaning back then. Besides the muslims back then were different. They got along with everyone. Nevertheless religion should not be the basis for one's actions. Marx decribed religion as a place with a “spiritless“ spirit. So in the end I do indentify myself with any religion there is.

  • I don't feel like this way. There's a lot of immigrants and minoriteis where I live but I don't feel any different. I certainly don't feel like I don't belong and I don't feel like they don't belong. We co exist as it should be

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  • definitely. Ny has changed so much over the last 20 years. It feels like a 3rd world country in many parts surrounded by rich people. Everyone else got the hell out of here.

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  • I do. I live in Hawaii and most of the people I go to school with are "local" (Asian, Filipino, Hawaiian, etc..) and I'm as Northern-European as they come. 15% of my school is white.

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  • Yes, people always think I'm from a southern European country (like Italy or form the Balkans) because of my dark hair and light eyes. I have very dark brown hair (most French have a light brown) and I have turquoise eyes when most have light brown eyes.
    Which always make me stand out. I also have very soft feature, full cheek and my body is different. Most girls have big legs and small breast and I have thin legs and a big chest which is really uncommon.

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  • I feel like a foreigner because I have to practice a religion I don't want to. Everyone looks at you like you're a fish out of water, which I am. I hate it.

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    • Which religion and why?

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    • @jacquesvol My point is, the United States is a free country, but that doesn't mean anything in my case until I'm 18.

  • Always have, I hate it here.

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    • 7d

      I am not like the locals. I was born here but I look different and not retarded enough, not that I want to be but it's frustrating and everything around me feels slow.

  • and what's wrong with multiculturalism? -__-

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    • It depends which points of view we're seeing it from. Some people thinks it's a good thing, other are skeptical. I can see both the pros and cons. It can be interesting to learn about new cultures and learn new things. But culture crash and cultures that isn't compatible can occur too.

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    • 7d

      @WhiteDuck this is debatable... but I don't wanna argue with you.. because you're not going to understand facts/statistics

    • 7d

      Which part of my statements say that I don't understand facts/statistics?

      But here's a fact, some cultures are stupid, inhumane and barbaric. And I think we all agree that these cultures and people who practice them are no good for any society.

  • I lived in Mexico from birth to age 4ish then moved to the US. I sometimes miss Mexico but not because I feel I don't belong here. I feel at home in both places :)

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  • Sometimes I do because while I was born in my country, and have parents who are nationals through birth, I look a bit too exotic and people think I'm a foreigner.

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  • More from Girls
    22

What Guys Said 85

  • Not at all. Switzerland has always been the home of many foreigners and I feel like that is a part of our culture. Contrary to other European nations, Switzerland was founded on the principle of "will". We often call our country "a nation of will". What this means is that our forefathers have united and created this country not because we speak a common language or because we share common religious views or because we have the same culture but because we chose to become one big, happy family. The right-wing in Switzerland tends to forget this sometimes but this is where our roots lie. So I don't mind living among people from far-away places. There is not one single set of "true" Swiss values everyone has to religiously stick to. All it takes to be a good resident of this country is the genuine desire to be here, the respect for the constitution and the laws and some motivation to integrate yourself culturally and socially. Everything else will fall into place.

    As for refugees: Switzerland has always been the home of refugees, some of which were famous too (Einstein, Lenin, Büchner etc.). During WW2, we have often failed our humanitarian responsibility and made ourselves guilty of the murders of thousands of Jewish refugees. Such mistakes shall never happen again. Switzerland is a tiny country with an already dense population but I believe we should accept as many people seeking political asylum as we can afford.

    And finally, I also enjoy multiculturalism quite a bit. How lame would it be to eat the same few dishes all the time. I'm thankful to the Italians who brought us pasta, the Japanese who brought us sushi, the Arabs who brought us this wonderful Lebanese and Moroccan cuisine.
    I'm not scared by foreign languages. As somebody who has studied linguistics, I find it a great enrichment. There is so much to learn from other cultures.

    Not all foreign immigrants are pleasant. Nor are all locals. A good mix is the best. I am married to a foreigner who also happens to be the greatest person I've ever met.

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  • My city has become much more multicultural on the past 50 years. I am not accustomed to this and I do not like it. Younger people don't understand and think that older people are intolerant but, when you get older, you will live surrounded by changes that you don't like.

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    • 7d

      I believe this is going to follow to the generations after yours and mine. Ergo the younger ones today will probably be the same as you about it later when they get older.

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      @Unit1 Yes, they would probably vehemently deny that if you asked them now but that is a part of human nature to which none of us are immune. As we get older, we get more resistant and less accepting to change.

    • 6d

      Ohhh!
      I am also an example of it!
      I remember when 5 years ago things were a lot different and the changes didn't come yet as they are today.
      5 Years ago we didn't have the influx of the immigrants and the internet wasn't restricted or banned. Those were times. Now the government is more control and power hungry than ever.

      Legit information and truths are banned today in certain parts of the world.

  • I do not

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  • I'm norwegian too, writing in English now so everyone understands. No, I do not feel like a foreigner, but I do feel like my social, public surroundings are more foreign. I just moved to a larger town, and it seems to me that half the people I pass are African, Asian and middle eastern. I wish them well adjusting. My mother works at the school here where they learn Norwegian, and says they are so nice, polite and grateful.
    I must however admit that it's sort of intimidating, to go from only Norwegians around here, to people you don't have a clue what background they have. I had a pretty bad experience with a Turkish guy in my block who was supposed to give me the key to the apartment, but rather ridiculed me and tried to trick me. God knows why. I had payed for that key and everything. That wouldn't have happened with a Norwegian. It's just something about the attitude towards strangers.

    They are for sure just people, but we are socialized very differently, and it takes time getting used to. If we get the guts to talk to each other we find they have humor, love being social and want to treat people good, almost always :)

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    • 7d

      Same here. I sees a lot of Africans, Asians, Middle-eastern etc. too. I can tell by the language they're speaking and how they dress. I thinks it's a bit intimidating too. Especially when they're talking loud in their language which sounds a bit angry for us more silent Norwegians and when many walks around covered in veils. I understands we're taking in refugees from wars etc. But I'm not surprised if we're going to experience a culture crash (Kulturkræsj). So I see both the pros and cons. But I can promise you not all African and Asian looking people are foreigners. Some are adopted from abroad by Norwegian people and since they're raised in Norway they lives like other Norwegians. "Verdens Barn" is an organization with adopting experiences.

    • 7d

      Sure. I just go along. What has happened in Sweden is way more extreme, and shows what might happen when conflicting cultures are forced together too fast. Obviously people need to get away from war, and with the stupid system human kind has made for itself with laws, borders and states it's all a big mess. A big mess that I hope will calm down with time.
      It's an important question you ask.

  • I don't really care about facial appearance or genetics that much. But when it comes to attitudes and behaviors, I'd say that I begin to feel that way even with locals who've been here their whole lives!

    No matter how high the mantle of morality is lifted, the minute you stop lifting, it sinks straight to the bottom. With no new immigrants or ethnic groups necessary, I've seen classy neighborhoods become trashy ones.

    It's a simple case of abandonment of decency. No one seems to believe in it anymore. And with it gone... poof!

    Add to that, government policies favoring third-world rat holes over nations that have actual morals and solid ideas on how to improve industry (and any president who dares see how that's wrong becoming the target of an incessant smear campaign by CNN and the other fruitcakes), and the immigrants have no hope either.

    If an entire neighborhood was upright, I could be surrounded by blacks and Asians on all sides, and feel completely okay. But start throwing in human locusts from literally anywhere, and it all goes away.

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  • If I feel sometimes like a foreigner in my own country, it's NOT because there are foreigners, but because the natives behave in such a weird way.

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  • I feel like a foreigner in my own country when I see neo-nazi's marching in the street and running down counter-protesters with motor vehicles.

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  • I do sometimes feel like a foreigner in my own country
    but not in the sense that the country that I know is changing. I've always lived in places with a lot of different cultures, went to a school with kids of like 12 different nationalities. It's more that I often get treated like a foreigner or looked down upon.

    The sentiment against us 'allochtonen'(people with at least 1 parent born outside the Netherlands) is increasing, especially with the massive growth of the FvD and PVV. PVV (extreme and vocal disdain against i. e. Moroccans, Turks and the lot) is about to become the biggest. Luckily, they won't govern

    Anyway, people series say I should sod off, think I'm not Dutch and soforth. If people ask me from which country I'm from, I usually say the Netherlands in my perfect Dutch, then they act all surprised and act as if I cannot be from here because I don't look (insert stereotype).

    Then there is the fact that the government actively separates us 'allochtonen' from the ethnic Dutch with the words and statistics. De facto, this is based on skin colour.

    Frankly, I get where the sentiment is coming from but it's very annoying for me. I often hear I have to integrate, that all of us lot are criminals (with my semi-moroccan background) and don't contribute anything.

    Very annoying but you learn to get a thick skin because of all the shit I've heard and/or seen.

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    • So it's not because of immigration but simply the fact that I was born, raised and have always lived and probably will always live in the Netherlands, did participate in Dutch culture and soforth and because of how I look never get treated as Dutch

    • 7d

      @tartaarsaus racism is based on looks and on a lot of hearsay spread to elect some politicians.

  • Well I was born in the USA but for the past 4 years we live in South America. My family has dual citizenships. US & Ecuador. So I'm an EC citizen but am the gringo boy... not a racial thing. But yes I do feel like a foreigner because technically i am. Only not in a bad way. It'sall good tho...

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    • 2d

      As for refugees, we mostly see Venezuelans trying to get to safety here.

  • I'll share a story with you. I live in a very populated city with many individual who are immigrants. I am not one. not every immigrant is like the men i will mention in this story.

    When I was working in a grocery store we often had those client who do not speak English (main language) or French (2nd main language) and more than often they try to get us to answer their question in their language which maybe 2 % of the population talk.

    There was that one time where this individual tried us to answer his question to our clerk. The clerk tried his best to understand him but he couldn't. He told the guy to leave her alone. He proceed to grab her arm very tight. he told him to stop but hit him on the head 3 time before walking away. the security guard caught him and the cops were called.

    A couple of month after the incident the grocery store was hit with a lawsuit over this for not giving the guy service in the aggressor language. He lost his lawsuit but the groceries store also lost a lot of money in this lawsuit.

    Some of them are shit some others are angels.

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  • Asian American guy here. I was born in the USA. I'm 100% American, I speak English at home, I celebrate American holidays, and am in tune with American culture.

    Yet I can't tell you how many times I've been told to go back to China, people say "Wow, your English is so good!" Basically, no matter how much time I've spent here or how well immersed I am in the US, a good number of my fellow Americans will never accept me. It's unfortunate.

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    • 7d

      Can I ask what state/city do you live in just curious.

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      @Oram52 I've lived in NYC, San Francisco, and now I'm in Minneapolis; all relatively large and diverse cities. But it's happened in all 3 places. Just because a city is diverse doesn't mean the people are accepting.

    • 7d

      Is it a common thing or just few bad apples. What I mean is it happens quite often or generally people are accepting and its just few ignorant people.

  • Not really, there are very few immigrants/refugees from outside Europe in Finland and most of them are concentrated in or near the capital area, so more than 100km from where I live. Apparently a lot of the refugees that came with the huge wave a while ago decided to leave because Finland is too cold and dark.

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    • Norway is also cold and dark, but there's still a lot of immigrants and refugees. Especially in Oslo and Bergen. There's increased so much that East-Oslo is known for being the immigrants' city, but West-Oslo is a more Norwegian part of the capital city. Is Finland colder than Norway?

    • I'm pretty sure that the Oslo area at least is warmer than even the southern capital areas of Finland, though I couldn't answer by how much. But otherwise I'd say they are pretty even.

  • As time goes by, I feel more like a foreigner in my country, not so much because of the different races, but because these immigrants have no interest in learning English or learning to leave their ways behind and become Americans. Instead, I'm being told I need to have an open mind and be more accepting of diversity. Somehow, it's being forced on me, and I'm supposed to 'like' it.

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  • Every time I see something that says, "President Trump" I feel like I'm in a bad science fiction movie. Does that count?

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  • I am a foreigner on earth lol... but for real, though!

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  • Yes I do.. Sweden isn't Swedish... It wasn't Swedish from the beginning we don't have any culture or our own language.. Well that's at least what the leftist goverment is telling me..

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    • Sweden save yourself :(

    • That dislike.. She must not know that Swedish politicians from the socialdemocrats and the green party and the left party has all 3 had politicians who have said we have no culture... Truth is harsh but we cannot deny truth nor facts.

  • It depends on where you live. Where i live now no I don't, there's no multiculturalism here, only a few foreigners who mostly talk and act the way we do. When I lived elsewhere (in another city) however yes I did, in many places there are no white Brits and the people have their own completely different culture.

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      In response to your reply, no I don't think so. Despite many people mixing with people of other races nowadays, people more often tend to date and prefer people of their own race. It's perfectly natural to want to have children with someone of similar genetic stock, with a similar culture, and without all of the potential problems that inter-racial relationships can bring.

      What we see now is nothing new. In good times everybody gets along relatively well and many people stop being so tribal. The thing is humans are tribal by nature, for thousands of years it was how we survived. Race is of course only one form of tribalism, within a race you'll have different nationalities that will side with each other also. Then you have political groups, even supporting different football teams. People need to have a "we" and "them" if that makes sense. Even if we did all mix, we'd still be tribal, especially in harder times which I think will come. I think racism will always exist.

  • Of course not. I grew up in a big city, but the specific neighborhood and larger area I grew up in was primarily dominated by Asians. I'm white by the way.

    Anyways, I never once felt alienated by any of my neighbors. Many of them were fresh immigrants who spoke predominantly their native language and had super broken English, yet they were still over the top friendly with me and didn't treat me any different than Asians.

    People who feel alienated by foreigners only feel alienated because of their own bigotry and prejudice. The reality is, foreigners aren't going to mistreat you. If you don't feel at home with them, just because of the color of their skin, then YOU are the problem. Not them.

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  • no, I feel like a foriegner in the human race, but that's another issue, I had the fortunate experience to grow up in an area with a diverse population, and have worked with people from many parts of the world. it's unfortunate that too many people are forced to flee bad situations in their home countries but the world is a better place for the opportunity to learn about and experience multiple cultures and peoples. my family is originally from Norway and Finland, but I'm third generation American. the world gets smaller every day, and people who try to isolate themselves from change and new ideas are going to be left behind. I for one embrace the idea of mingling with people of other cultures, just so long as we can respect each other, and allow ourselves to broaden our world view.

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  • very much so. my prime minister (trudeau) also said I'm ungrateful because I was born here, that's not how it works.

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  • Unfortunately yes. Atlanta is very much a city of Africans, Mexicans, Arabs, Indians, central Americans... very few people Americans.

    And no, the USA was not a nation of immigrants... it was a nation of settlers, who almost exclusively came from Great Britain and Germany. It wasn't until almost 75 years after the Declaration of Independence that we had waves of irish and italian immigrants--and the waves of Africans and central americans started only 50 years ago.

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  • I don't know if I'm the minority in my city but Hispanics are the vast majority in my school at like 56%. I am of the hwhite vaRieteh and I don't feel like a foreigner, just not as cultured. Maybe I try out my neighbors food truck food, it's looks authentic as fuck.

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  • No. Britain is a mongrel nation, we're already immigrants ourselves. I like the diversity, I can get any kind of food I want without leaving my street xD

    I see it as a benefit to have access to so many cultures.

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    • Britain is composed of Celts, Angles , Saxons (Angles and Saxons moved out of the area called Poland today to Germany) , ancient Scandinavians immigrating from Normandy where they had settled and started to speak French and more recent. Scandinavians. In 1066 the immigrants from Normandy won the battle of Hastings.
      There have also been Frisian immigrants in Britain.
      Mongrel , indeed. But so is the rest of Europe. History makes the EDF ao nationalists in any country look ridiculous.

    • I wasn't aware of a lot of the details so that was actually quite interesting 👍

      I don't really understand the importance people place on where they're from in the first place. It just seems like a nice easy way to justify hate.

  • When I was last in Germany in 2015 I felt 100% home and comfortable.
    I miss being in Germany.
    Whether immigrants are in Germany or not (and most of them are in Germany) I do feel like part of the folks. But for some weird reason the government grants more privileges to the outsiders than it does to us.

    Which is very typical and expected from the government.

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  • nah I do pretty well, I always become the influencer wherever I go.

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  • well I live in America and we're a nation of colonists and immigrants so *shrugs*

    I mean just an hour from my lies the biggest I think it's Korean population in the world outside of Korea itself complete with Korean markets and everything.

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  • I feel like I'm in Central America in some areas in some towns where I live because I only speak English but everyone around me is speaking Spanish but I live in America so that's when I feel like that

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  • yes especially when I go to places like little Mexico where no one speaks English and no one has a visa or Green card.

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  • the west in general is slowly getting that more and more "Diverse" it's only a matter of time before the west will fall into chaos like the middle east that we keep letting Savages come from

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  • i live in Germany and some (mostly Idiot) people also say that.
    in my City we have many turkish people, refugees and many others but ITS still a German City with mostly German culture s and many Well integrative immigrants who try to Take Part in the "German" society.
    so i dont Feeling so and There is No Problem with Integration of There are enough welcoming people who Integrate the immigrants

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