8 Fascinating Animals That Are Now Extinct

#FascinatingAnimals

#ExtinctAnimals

Steller’s sea cow

8 Fascinating Animals That Are Now Extinct

The largest mammals, other than whales, to have existed in the holocene epoch, the Steller’s sea cow reached up to nine metres in length but was hunted to extinction in 1768, within 27 years of its discovery by Europeans.

Moa

8 Fascinating Animals That Are Now Extinct

The Moa was a large species of flightless bird native to New Zealand. They could grow to almost 4m in height (12ft) and weigh 230kg (520lb). Despite their incredible height, the bird's vertebrae suggest they spent much of their time with their necks pointed forward. These long necks likely produced low-pitched, resonant calling sounds.

Atlas Bear

8 Fascinating Animals That Are Now Extinct

The Atlas bear is an extinct bear subspecies found in Northern Africa. Zoologists classified it as a separate species after it was brought to the public's attention by a serviceman in 1840. This species was stockier and sturdier than the American black bear. It was Africa's only native bear that survived into modern times.

Golden Toad

8 Fascinating Animals That Are Now Extinct

The golden toad was once abundant in a small region of Costa Rica. The toad's main habitat was on a cold, wet ridge called Brillante - where 1500 of them had been breeding since 1972. However, the last documented mating episode occurred in April of 1987, and now they are all gone.

Pinta Island Tortoise

8 Fascinating Animals That Are Now Extinct

The Pinta Island tortoise was a subspecies of giant tortoise that lived on the Galapagos Islands. They slept for about 16 hours a day and drank large quantities of water to store for use at a later time.

Desert Rat Kangaroo

8 Fascinating Animals That Are Now Extinct

This small, hopping marsupial from the desert regions of Central Australia was discovered in the early 1840s - and then wasn't recorded for the next 90 years. The species was then rediscovered in 1931, but that last colony died out too; a 2011 reported sighting of a desert rat kangaroo nest yielded no usable DNA.

Laughing Owl

8 Fascinating Animals That Are Now Extinct

Named after its laugh-like calls, the Laughing owl generally lived in the rocky, low rainfall areas and forests of New Zealand. It became extinct in around 1914 after Europeans introduced predators such as cats and stoats, which hunted the owls. There have been a few sightings of the Laughing owl over the years, but none have been confirmed yet.

Japanese Honshū Wolf

8 Fascinating Animals That Are Now Extinct

The Japanese Honshū wolf is an extinct subspecies of the gray wolf; once endemic to the islands of Honshū, Shikoku, and Kyūshū. The last valid specimens were recorded in 1905 - though there have been hoaxes that only turned out to be feral dogs.


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Most Helpful Guys

  • 7d

    My personal favorite the Haast's Eagle the largest of which could weigh 230 kg (510 lb). Haast's eagle became extinct around 1400, after the moa were hunted to extinction by the first Māori.

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    • 7d

      Yeah, they actually used to hunt the Moa but when the Moa went extinct they didn't have enough pray that were big enough for them (since Moa were their main pray) and that's half the reason their extinct now.

Most Helpful Girls

  • 7d

    Laughing owl looks so cute!

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What Guys Said 24

  • 7d
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    • 7d

      I can't watch the video, it'n not available to watch here :(

  • 2d

    Cool, thanks for sharing. One of my favorite to hear about are the Terror Birds. Google for more info.

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    • 2d

      Wow, they look terrifying

    • 2d

      Considering they were an Apex Predator, really large, could bite bone in half, and their screech that is so loud it could make you go deaf are some good reasons to call it a Terror Bird.

  • 5d

    amazing take. a few more for your list -
    the dodo - The dodo is an extinct flightless bird that was endemic to the island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean
    the quagga - The quagga was a plains zebra that lived in South Africa until becoming extinct late in the 19th century. It was long thought to be a distinct species, but early genetic studies have supported it being a subspecies of plains zebra
    Western black rhinoceros
    This subspecies of the black rhino once roamed sub-Saharan Africa, but fell victim to poaching. Its population was in the hundreds in 1980, fell to 10 by 2000, and just five a year later. Surveys in 2006 failed to locate any and it was declared extinct in 2011
    . Pyrenean ibex
    Extinct since 2000, the Pyrenean ibex - a subspecies of the Spanish ibex - was once common to the Pyrenees but its population fell sharply in the 19th and 20th centuries. The reasons behind its decline remain unknown. In 2003 it briefly became “unextinct”, after scientist managed to clone a female, but it died minutes after being born.
    Tasmanian tiger
    A shy, nocturnal animal and similar in appearance to a dog (but with a stiff tail and abdominal pouch), the Tasmanian tiger was rare or extinct on the Australian mainland before the arrival of the British, but survived on Tasmania. Hunting, disease, the introduction of dogs and human encroachment all contributed to its demise there. The last known specimen died in Hobart Zoo in 1936.
    Great auk
    Once common to the North Atlantic, including the coast of Britain, the great auk - like penguins, though unrelated - was flightless, and clumsy on land, but an agile swimmer. Demand for its down contributed to its elimination from Europe, while early explorers used it as a convenient food source. It has been extinct since at least 1852.

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  • 7d

    Great Take. Well over 99% of all animal species that have ever existed are now extinct, which is sobering. Hopefully we have learned the right lessons from their extinction.

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  • 1d

    I was aware of some of them. I used to love studying the aimal kingdom. I've wained off of it though, sadly. Need to get back into it.

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  • 7d

    Very interesting Take, most of these animals were really fascinating, maybe science will manage to clone them someday.

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  • 3d

    i find it kind of funny, that only humans are bothered by species going exctinct xD it's a perfectly normal process.

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    • 2d

      Not entirely true... it's NOT normal when humans are the primary cause of the extinction, for no real reason except profit. THAT... is not normal evolution.

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    • 4h

      Other animals don't have an "interest" because they don't reason. The quote says there is an "instinctive equilibrium with the surrounding environment", and much of the balance is naturally established. Humans, for the most part, don't appear to "care" about their environment until it is actually, visibly threatened or deteriorated. Humans are not good about prevention, or even maintenance. For the most part, Mr. Smith is correct - we act much MORE like a virus than co-dependent organisms.

    • 3h

      @loveslongnails humans at least care when it's visibly threatened animals freaking never do. like that equilibrium argument just got more ridiculous because you just said animals don "reason", yet you claim they're more reasonable with their environment than humans. that makes a lot of sense dude. by the way a virus is also just another species that behaves like all other species. they just eat till what they eat is gone and then they go over to the next thing untill there's nothing left and then they die. that's the thing i'm saying the entire time. no species cares for environment but humans.

  • 5d

    Unfortunately we are going to see a lot more extinctions in the next 20 Years.

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  • 4d

    I think Desert Rat Kangaroos would have made great pets.

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  • 21h

    Nice take. This is what gag should be for but whatevs. Africas only is extinct? Damn it man

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  • 1d

    B. I. H.

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  • 7d

    wow that moa is a big bird

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  • 7d

    Thank you for sharing this with us well written :)

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  • 1d

    Interesting animals.

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  • 1d

    Great take...

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  • 2d

    I'd want a laughing owl.

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  • 4d

    Humans just fuck up everything we can...

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  • 7d

    This is a very awesome take

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  • 7d

    Laughing owl? Lol Cool

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  • 3d

    U forgot 50 Strong and 051 niggas😂

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  • 6d

    So depressing

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  • 7d

    Very Interesting !!

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  • 7d

    What about the Megatherium, Smilodon, Terror Birds, Wooly Mammoth, Glyptodonts, Basilosaurus, Hyenodon, Paraceratherium, Entelodonts and so many more?

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  • 7d

    Nice take

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What Girls Said 4

  • 7d

    Wow cool

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  • 7d

    Good take

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  • 3d

    Interesting MyTake
    Thanks for sharing! That owl has super weird eyes

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  • 7d

    So sad...
    Humans are so disgusting, making species extinct like that.

    I actually didn't know the golden toad was extinct, which isn't nice to know.

    Good myTake.

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    • 6d

      Survival of the fittest, humans didn’t know better back then.

    • 4d

      Silly thing to say, it is the same for all species, it just we are more powerful and developed, so we are more successful. Womens obsession with putting animals first has led me to coin the phrase 'wet wipe woman' after so many of them tried to ban fireworks early November in the UK because of the animals.

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