The advice Hurricane Irma made me realize was right, (it really is better to be too cold than too hot)

The advice Hurricane Irma made me realize was right, (it really is better to be too cold than too hot)

This advice comes from a rather strange place, Plymouth Plantation, its a recreation of a 17th century New England village, a living history museum, period dress, period weapons are carried around and fired with blanks, a recreation of a Wampanoag Village with actual Wampanoag as the living history teachers.

I remember being young and with a school group and one of my classmates asked, "is it better to cold or hot."

The man, who was portraying a pilgrim said, "its better to be cold than hot, there are things you can do about it after all."

I was young and at the time I hated the cold, I hated winter, and I wanted to move to phoenix arizona so I would never be cold again. (I am not making any of that up and I like cold weather now, If I was going to move to the southwest I'd move to new mexico where they do get snow, and I do like winter.)

So I remember thinking that the guy was wrong.

Now a couple of things happened, first in the 2011 Halloween Nor'easter a few years back I like many other New Englanders lost power for days, and I had a chest cold that due to the actual cold developed into pneumonia, but we powered through, we had both fireplaces going (the people who built this house had an addition installed where they put another fireplace giving them two, don't ask me why.) and we wore warm clothes and we covered ourselves in as many blankets as possible, we were out of power for four days and it took the goddamn electric company five minutes to fix it, the only reason we got it restored after four days instead of like seven was because a neighbor flagged down a passing national grid van and asked them what was going on, five minutes later we had power. It turns out they had to do something to one of the boxes nearby. i've lost power during a snowstorm, Most New Englanders have but the whole pneumonia thing makes this one stick out to me.

Now when the people affected by hurricane Irma people didn't have the ability to cool down, they just had to suffer through it, when we could put on heavy clothes and light a fire and I don't know why but I thought of that time in Plymouth plantation, of that school trip, and I realize, the guy was right.


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Waffles731 is a GirlsAskGuys Editor
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Most Helpful Girl

  • That's right.

    If you live in a tropical area, then chances are high for you to consume electricity often by using electric fans and airconditioners in withstanding temperatures that can rise up to 40°C. These portable electric fans are replacing ‘traditional’ handheld fans in my country, the Philippines. Here's a photo of one:

    ae01.alicdn.com/.../...ry-USB-Charging-Desktop.jpg

    Those portables don't necessarily make up your utility costs in using electricity but they do make you spend money by purchasing the appropriate batteries needed for them to function.

    If you live in an area experiencing a temperate climate, then you can adapt by simply wearing layers of clothing and by preparing, I guess, hot beverage. Heating water using matches (oftentimes costless because of firewood) can be done for free compared to freezing ice cubes and putting them in beverages (this needs a refrigerator and using it will consume electricity, thereby increasing one's electricity bill).

    We've had numerous class suspensions this school year because of typhoons and tropical depressions entering and leaving. I've noticed class cancellations due to snowstorms (occurs only in the cold areas) occur less often than class cancellations due to typhoons and tropical depressions (occur only in the hot areas). Cancellations decrease chances of productivity in school.

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Most Helpful Guy

  • I agree. There are many things you can do to warm yourself up when it's cold, but when it's hot the limit is being naked, in the shade, sitting in a pond.

    Winter where I live lasts from about the third week of September until the end of April or beginning of May, though it doesn't get really warm until June. And it's brutally cold for a good portion of the winter. My particular area is milder than most of the rest of the state, but we still get about two to six weeks where it's at least 20 below zero (Fahrenheit). I love it because it weeds out most of the weaklings. Our winters WILL kill you if you don't respect winter, and might kill you even if you do.

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What Girls Said 10

  • There's definitely advantages of living in a cooler climate. I live in Canada and we get snow where I live. It's great! I love it, of course it comes with it's issues. But yes, you can always put on warmer clothes.

    I'll never have to worry about a hurricane, I am very lucky. However, we do get really crazy weather. I lived through an ice storm where we lost power for several days.

    We've also had flooding and tornadoes (but not that often). I think no matter where you live you are going to experience extreme weather events. Sure, some places are less likely to experience them but it's always good to be prepared.

    I think being aware and realistic as well as prepared is going to make you more able to withstand any storm.

    Woodstoves are great because they can run usually without electricity. My family is actually considering getting a woodstove. Because if we lose power we would not have heat and in the winter we need heat.

    I have a camping stove and some other supplies and am working on getting together an emergency kit so that incase we do have a severe weather event we can still eat and have water.

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  • Well of course...
    I've always maintained that being too cold can always be dealt with... and I quite like the cold... while being too hot is murder on everything -especially a person's spirit.

    Being too hot is bad for the Earth and for people's bodies. There's a reason why people can be preserved in ice... but they can't be preserved in fire...

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  • I've never been in a catastrophic situation, but I will always prefer cold to heat.

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  • That might be true
    I'm just sorry for the disaster it wreaked

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  • Yesssss I hate the heat 😣
    Much much much rather be cold!!

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  • Irma Storm is a woman who was cheated by her husband and became an angry lesbian third wave feminist.

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  • Yes i understand you

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  • Very true

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  • When Hurricane Ike hit us, some in the city and surrounding areas did not have power for up to 4+ weeks. As you say, you can deal with the cold and throw on a blanket, but the heat is not to be f'd with. THE only reason people can comfortably live in the South long term IS because we have the ability to use air conditioning. Before the advent of it, people living here only had two options... sleep and function largely outside for most of the day or travel to summer homes elsewhere where it was cooler during the summers.

    When Ike hit, I left so fast, there was wind in my dust because I knew what would happen if the power went down, and because of it, even though my neighbor informed me that my house had survived with little damage, I did not come back until she said the power had been turned back on. My a/c has now died out of storm conditions and QUICKLY been replaced 2x in the many years I've lived here and let me tell you, it took about 4 hours from the outage, for the internal temperature inside the house to reach 86 F... I did not stay to find out how hot it became midday. Just up and left and went to my aunt's house until the a/c guy could get there.

    So I've thought about this though, would I rather die from heat or cold, and I'd still give it to heat. Heat stroke happens relatively quickly. (I know, it happened to me on vacation). Your body feels really weird, like you know something is terribly wrong, you get a bit squirly, and then your body shuts down, you pass out or it can get your heart if you have heart disease, shut down your kidneys, brain function, and you're gone if you don't immediately treat it, but freezing to death takes time, and you feel your body slowly becoming numb and losing all feeling to your extremities which is painful as heat tries to rush to your heart/brain to save them, and you've got to feel yourself dying... so... no... live in the cold, die in the heat.

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  • right

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What Guys Said 23

  • Well I mean you could just go into the water to cool off.

    Cold weather actually has almost identical problems except it's warming up instead of cooling down. And considering not many houses have functioning wood burning fire places or furnaces. Means that if the power went down or your house got destroyed you'd most likely freeze to death, especially if a hurricane happened you'd most likely succumb to hypothermia. Due to do probable flooding and low temperatures.

    I'd say cold weather has the potential to be far more dangerous.

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  • Being too hot is always better. You just feel uncomfortable and wet. Being too cold can physically hurt you and lead to lots of limbs. Also, shoveling snow and driving in snow sucks ass. I say this as someone who has lived in new jersey and now lives in Texas.

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  • True... I agree
    I think it's easier to warm up during cold than it is to cool down during hot

    Too hot and humid though can cause issues, breathing.. heat strokes... dehydration
    Cold doesn't do any of that, you're just cold and that's it... but you can always use clothes, which everyone has, to warm up

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  • Yes on a very simple level it is much easier to warm up than cool down. I probably live in what would be classed as mild climate all year around and the funny thing is we can't handle a couple of degrees either way. More than a couple of inches of snow the country comes to a standstill and anything over 85F or 30C is a heatwave.

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  • I live in fairbanks alaska never came close to a natural disaster. Maybe an earthquake 10 years ago was scary nothing happened though. ice blocking a river flow but i live on a hill.

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  • Thank you

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  • We don't have cold in CA.

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  • Lol this was a pleasure

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  • You can go in the water and cool off. Your surrounded by ocean in florida.

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    • During a hurricane though lol... not sure hahah

    • @TripleAce Anyone that went during a hurricane would most likely get injured or killed in a process I refer to as natural selection. For Waffles731 , he could go afterwards when there's no AC and he doesn't have a backup generator.

  • I thought you lived in California

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  • Interesting

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  • Couldn't agree with u more

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  • More people die every year from cold than from heat by a wide margin.

    If you live in a sub zero place and you don't have fuel, you will soon be dead. If you live in some goddamn hot place like Houston, you will be miserable, but alive.

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  • yep enzymes denature when your body gets to around 40 C if you can't some how get rid of that heat your done for.

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  • If you're Ok with hypothermia, winter storms, slidey streets, little to no sunshine, frozen beaches and waters, and not feeling the mood to go and take a walk because its to... Cold, I guest you rather deal with cold climates dangers.

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  • In certain regions only

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  • Prepare Prepare Prepare 3 =2 and 2 = 1 and 1 =none.

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  • I wouldn't know. It's all grey skies and rain here.

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  • this is a tropical issue, not just how weather in general. There are great places in cali that dont deal with this stuff. I think you are just nitpicking

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  • I totally agree!

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